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Perpendicular

Denoting the latest stage of English Gothic church architecture, prevalent from the late 14th to mid 16th centuries and characterized by broad arches, elaborate fan vaulting, and large ...

Perpendicular

Perpendicular   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

... denoting the latest stage of English Gothic church architecture, prevalent from the late 14th to mid 16th centuries and characterized by broad arches, elaborate fan vaulting, and large windows with vertical...

Log

Log   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...An instrument for measuring the speed of a ship. In its simplest form it is a flat piece of wood, some 6in (15cm) in radius, in the shape of a quadrant, and made so that it will float perpendicularly. To this is fastened the log-line, which is knotted at intervals. See also knot . Logbook In a ship the journal in which the logs are entered. It also contains the general record of proceedings on board, especially the navigational and meteorological records. The word later came to be used for the document that gave the ownership and other details of a motor...

Leaning Tower of Pisa

Leaning Tower of Pisa   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

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Current Version:
2006

...Tower of Pisa the circular bell tower of Pisa cathedral, which leans about 5 m (17 ft) from the perpendicular over its height of 55 m (181...

Decorated

Decorated   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...denoting a stage of English Gothic church architecture typical of the 14th century (between Early English and Perpendicular), with increasing use of decoration and geometrical, curvilinear, and reticulated...

Cartesian

Cartesian   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...or relating to the ideas of the philosopher René Descartes ( 1596–1650 ), deriving from Cartesius , the Latinized form of his name. Cartesian coordinates numbers which indicate the location of a point relative to a fixed reference point (the origin), being its shortest (perpendicular) distances from two fixed axes (or three planes defined by three fixed axes) which intersect at right angles at the...

Gothic

Gothic   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...in the 12th–16th centuries (and revived in the mid 18th to early 20th centuries), characterized by pointed arches, rib vaults, and flying buttresses, together with large windows and elaborate tracery. English Gothic architecture is divided into Early English, Decorated, and Perpendicular. The word comes via French or late Latin from Gothi ‘the Goths’, and was used in the 17th and 18th centuries to mean ‘not classical’ (i.e. not Greek or Roman), and hence to refer to medieval architecture which did not follow classical models and a typeface based on medieval...

Paly

Paly   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

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Current Version:
2013

...In heraldry , this means divided perpendicularly into an even number of equal...

Gules

Gules   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

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Current Version:
2013

...The heraldic term for red. In engraving it is shown by perpendicular parallel lines. The word comes from Old French gueules , the term for a red fur worn round the neck, itself from gole , ‘throat’. Like all heraldic colours (or tinctures, as they are properly called), the word occurs in poetical works. Full on this casement shone the wintry moon, And threw warm gules on Madeline’s fair...

Sable

Sable   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

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Current Version:
2013

...The heraldic term for ‘black’, shown in engraving by horizontal lines crossing perpendicular ones. The fur of the animal of this name is brown, but it is probable that in the 15th century, when the heraldic term was first used, the fur was dyed black, as seal fur has been in modern times. Sable fur was always much sought after and was very...

Mansard roof

Mansard roof   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

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Current Version:
2013

...roof Also called a curb roof, this was named after the French architect François Mansart ( 1598–1666 ), although the style was used by Pierre Lescot ( c. 1510–78 ) at the Louvre in about 1550 . Instead of forming an L-shape, the lower slope is almost perpendicular, while the upper is at a gentler angle. It was in use in the USA in the old colonial days, and there the term denotes a double-pitched roof, sloping up from the four sides of a building. Where it ends in two gables it is called a gambrel...

Leaning tower

Leaning tower   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

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Current Version:
2013

...a number of leaning campanili (bell towers) in Italy, the most celebrated is the eight-storey tower of the cathedral of Pisa, which stands apart from the main building. It is 179ft (54.5m) high, 57ft 6in (17.5m) in diameter at the base, and leans about 15ft (4.5m) from the perpendicular. It was begun in 1173 and the sinking commenced during construction, but it continued to stand because the centre of gravity was within its walls. Galileo used the overhanging tower to make his experiments in gravitation. The angle of incline has gradually increased,...

Angoulaffre

Angoulaffre   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

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Current Version:
2013

...his enormous mouth was armed with sharp pointed yellow tusks. He was descended from Goliath, and assumed the title of ‘Governor of Jerusalem.’ Angoulaffre had the strength of 30 men, and his mace was the trunk of an oak-tree 300 years old. Some say the Tower of Pisa lost its perpendicularity by the weight of this giant, who one day leaned against it to rest himself. He was slain by Roland , the paladin, in single combat at the Fronsac. ( Croquemitaine ) from Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable ( 1896...

Loop the loop

Loop the loop   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable (2 ed.)

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Current Version:
2011

...the loop . The air pilot's term for the manoeuvre that consists of describing a perpendicular circle in the air. At the top of the circle, or loop, the pilot is upside down. The term is from a kind of switchback once popular at fairs in which a moving car or bicycle performed a similar revolution on a perpendicularly circular...

Penny

Penny   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...called the ‘ordinary’ bicycle that came into vogue in 1872 . The front wheel was sometimes as much as 5ft (1.5m) in diameter, while the rear was only 12in (30cm), hence the name. The drive was on the front wheel, the seat being directly above it and slightly back from the perpendicular of the axle. The ‘Safety’ bicycle, much on the lines of the usual cycle of today, was introduced in 1885 . Penny for your thoughts, A Tell me what you are thinking about. A phrase addressed humorously to one in a brown study . The phrase occurs in John Heywood ’s Proverbs ...

Moriarty, Biddy

Moriarty, Biddy   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Irish Phrase & Fable

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...divil fly away with you, you micher from Munster, and make celery-sauce of your rotten limbs, you mealy mouthed tub of guts.’ (A micher is one who plays truant.) O'Connell's exotic, geometric reponses finally silenced her: ‘Look at her, boys! There she stands – a convicted perpendicular in petticoats! There's contamination in her circumference, and she trembles with guilt down to the extremities of her corollaries. Ah, you're found out, you rectilineal antecedent, and equiangular old hag! 'Tis with the devil you will fly away, you porter-swiping similitude of...

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