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Overview

Perpendicular

Denoting the latest stage of English Gothic church architecture, prevalent from the late 14th to mid 16th centuries and characterized by broad arches, elaborate fan vaulting, and large ...

Casement, Roger

Casement, Roger (1864–1916)   Reference library

Oxford Reader’s Companion To Conrad

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
1,554 words

...on 3 August 1916 . During his American visit in 1923 Conrad again had occasion to remember Casement, but the impression had become more ominous and suggestive of Kurtz : ‘Conrad was running his boat down the sluggish river when a tall, gaunt figure rose against the perpendicular face of a dark bluff. Crouching behind him, in an attitude suggesting a perverted sort of worship, was his servant and at his heels were two black bull-dogs’ (John Powell, ‘Conrad and Casement Hut Mates in Africa’, New York Evening Post , 11 May 1923 , 15). Serious biographies...

Commonplace Book

Commonplace Book   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
297 words

...our studies—in accounts—in diet—and in cleanliness.’ Trollope made a particular point of the need for order in careful monetary accounting. The young man entering life, he advised, ‘wd. make no bad bargain in dividing half his last shilling to buying a red book with blue perpendicular lines—Those blue lines so hated by the young gentry of small fortunes, would fill themselves with figures on the right sheet, were they properly attended to in every monetary transaction.’ The future Post Office surveyor would maintain meticulous records of his expenditures on...

phrenology

phrenology   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to George Eliot

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
570 words

...as the organizing principle of his biography. In her novels, Eliot often uses phrenological descriptions of facial features to convey character. In Adam Bede , for instance, a phrenological vocabulary is adopted to describe Seth's ‘coronal arch’ ( AB 5), and Dinah's ‘low perpendicular brow’ ( AB 30). Latterly, however, Eliot distanced herself from the claims of phrenology to a scientific assessment of character—what G. H. *Lewes scathingly calls the ‘art of cranioscopy’ ( L ii. 210). For Eliot, as for Lewes, the importance of phrenology was its...

Titian

Titian   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to George Eliot

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
646 words

...are ‘long, flexible, firmly-grasping hands, such as Titian has painted in a picture where he wished to show the combination of refinement with force. And there is something of likeness, too, between the faces belonging to the hands—in both the uniform pale-brown skin, the perpendicular brow, the calmly penetrating eyes’ ( DD 17). George Eliot and Lewes saw many works by Titian in *Venice in 1860 . Two of his most famous paintings, St Peter Martyr ( 1530 , now destroyed) and the Assumption of the Virgin ( 1516–18 , now once more hanging in the Church...

history

history   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Hardy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
2,018 words

...a local story of Lyonnesse ( The Famous Tragedy of the Queen of Cornwall ); even Hardy's admiration for the splendours of medieval architecture is mediated through the story of the architect who, in designing the church that was later to become Gloucester Cathedral, invented Perpendicular Gothic (‘The Abbey Mason’, SC ). Echoes of the Civil War are heard in the story of ‘Anna, Lady Baxby’ ( GND ) and echoes of the Monmouth Rebellion in ‘The Duke's Reappearance’ ( CM ). In Hardy's own time, the drama of the *Boer War comes alive as the reader is presented...

fate

fate   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Hardy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
2,376 words

...By the irony of fate, and the curious trick in Sue's nature of tempting Providence at critical times, she took his arm as they walked through the muddy street—a thing she had never done before in her life—and on turning the corner they found themselves close to a grey Perpendicular church with a low-pitched roof—the church of St Thomas. ‘That's the church,’ said Jude . ‘Where I am going to be married?’ ‘Yes.’ It is the combination here of ‘the irony of fate’ and ‘the curious trick in Sue's nature of tempting Providence at critical times’ that marks the...

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