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Overview

Perpendicular

Denoting the latest stage of English Gothic church architecture, prevalent from the late 14th to mid 16th centuries and characterized by broad arches, elaborate fan vaulting, and large ...

Caunterbury

Caunterbury   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...church, and several times rebuilt and reconstructed. The choir was begun by the French master mason William of Sens in 1175 in the Gothic style and completed by William the Englishman in 1179–84 . A new nave was built during Chaucer's time by Henry Yevele in the Perpendicular style ( see architecture ). The elaborate shrine of Becket, at which healing miracles were regularly reported, stood in Trinity Chapel behind the high altar from 1220 until 1538 , when it was destroyed by Henry VIII . Pilgrims entered by the West Gate of the walled town...

architecture

architecture   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...Windows became very large, and were filled with stained glass glorifying God with a radiance of light. England in the 14th c. was beginning to adapt French Gothic in distinctive ways, both in the ‘Decorated’ style ( c. 1290–1350 ) and in the later, distinctively English ‘Perpendicular’ style with its high soaring lines and its fan-vaulting (as in the choir of Gloucester Abbey, the choir at York, and the naves of Winchester and Canterbury. In the more prosperous areas of the country, parish churches were being built (or rebuilt or extended, like St Mary...

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