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Perpendicular

Denoting the latest stage of English Gothic church architecture, prevalent from the late 14th to mid 16th centuries and characterized by broad arches, elaborate fan vaulting, and large ...

perpendicular

perpendicular adj   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Original Shakespearean Pronunciation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...perpendicular adj ˌpɐ:ɹpǝn'dɪkjǝlǝɹ sp perpendicular 1 ...

Perpendicular

Perpendicular   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

... denoting the latest stage of English Gothic church architecture, prevalent from the late 14th to mid 16th centuries and characterized by broad arches, elaborate fan vaulting, and large windows with vertical...

perpendicularly

perpendicularly adv   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Original Shakespearean Pronunciation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...perpendicularly adv ˌpɐ:ɹpǝn'dɪkjǝˌlɐ:ɹlǝɪ sp perpendicularly 1 ...

Log

Log   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...An instrument for measuring the speed of a ship. In its simplest form it is a flat piece of wood, some 6in (15cm) in radius, in the shape of a quadrant, and made so that it will float perpendicularly. To this is fastened the log-line, which is knotted at intervals. See also knot . Logbook In a ship the journal in which the logs are entered. It also contains the general record of proceedings on board, especially the navigational and meteorological records. The word later came to be used for the document that gave the ownership and other details of a motor...

Casement, Roger

Casement, Roger (1864–1916)   Reference library

Oxford Reader’s Companion To Conrad

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
1,554 words

...on 3 August 1916 . During his American visit in 1923 Conrad again had occasion to remember Casement, but the impression had become more ominous and suggestive of Kurtz : ‘Conrad was running his boat down the sluggish river when a tall, gaunt figure rose against the perpendicular face of a dark bluff. Crouching behind him, in an attitude suggesting a perverted sort of worship, was his servant and at his heels were two black bull-dogs’ (John Powell, ‘Conrad and Casement Hut Mates in Africa’, New York Evening Post , 11 May 1923 , 15). Serious biographies...

Long Melford

Long Melford  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
SuffolkVillage stretching for 2 m. along the A134, just N of Sudbury. At the N end the large green is dominated by the Perpendicular church. In the Clopton chantry ...
Tironian sign

Tironian sign  

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Overview Page
Shorthand for ‘et’/‘and’, deriving from Cicero’s servant Marcus Tullius Tiro’s Tironian notes. Beginning as two perpendicular lines of equal length (┐), it developed into ‘7’. Tironian ‘et’ was used ...
sexto

sexto  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Little-used format, comprising six printed leaves per sheet, either all parallel or two perpendicular to the others. Signatures are in sixes, or in fours and twos. Karen AttarKEAB. ...
laid lines

laid lines  

Reference type:
Overview Page
In laid paper, faint lines—perceptible when the sheet is held up to the light—running close together and perpendicular to the chain lines. In hand-made paper, they are created by the ...
wire-lines

wire-lines  

Reference type:
Overview Page
In laid paper, wire-lines are the light, close-set parallel lines, just visible when held up to the light, that run perpendicular to the more pronounced chain-lines (Compare chain-lines). They are ...
Crowland

Crowland  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
LincolnshireSmall town off the A47, 10 m. NE of Peterborough, where the half‐ruined Norman abbey towers above the fens. Some consider Gesta Herewardi to have been a 15th‐c. forgery ...
quatrefoil

quatrefoil  

An ornamental design of four lobes or leaves as used in architectural tracery, resembling a flower or clover leaf.
Jacobean

Jacobean  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Of or relating to the reign (1603–25) of James I of England; (of furniture) in the style prevalent during the reign of James I, especially being the colour of dark oak.
flint

flint  

Variety of chert, which occurs commonly as nodules and bands in chalk. It is deposited in the porous, permeable structures of sponge, diatom, and echinoid skeletons and also in burrows.
glass

glass  

[Ma]An artificial material produced by fusing silica sand with an alkali such as potash or sodium. It was probably developed from faience in the Near East during the 3rd millennium bc, but was not ...
Long Melford

Long Melford   Reference library

The Oxford Guide to Literary Britain & Ireland (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature, Society and culture
Length:
125 words

...Melford Suffolk Village stretching for 2 m. along the A134, just N of Sudbury. At the N end the large green is dominated by the Perpendicular church. In the Clopton chantry chapel ( c. 1496 ) the ceiling is decorated by verses on a scroll said to be by John Lydgate ( d. 1450 ), one‐time monk at Bury St Edmunds. Edmund Blunden , who returned from Hong Kong in 1965 , lived at Hall Mill. He died in 1974 and is buried in the churchyard. A souvenir collection of his poems is on sale in the church, for which he wrote a guide. Patricia Beer's 1967 poem...

chain-lines

chain-lines   Reference library

A Dictionary of English Manuscript Terminology 1450–2000

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, History
Length:
156 words

...lines, are the prominent, wide-spaced, parallel lines in laid paper, used in both manuscripts and printed books, left by the wire mesh across the bottom of the mould or tray in which the paper was made. They are to be distinguished from the lighter, close-set lines running perpendicular to them called ‘wire-lines’. The chain-lines are visible when the paper is held up to the light. The original tray had the wires responsible for chain-lines running across its width; thus a full sheet of paper, held up lengthways to the light, will show chain-lines running...

Elstow

Elstow   Reference library

The Oxford Guide to Literary Britain & Ireland (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature, Society and culture
Length:
242 words

...Lane and following the signpost beside the brook. Except in dry weather the going is heavy and the mud can be a chastening reminder of the Slough of Despond. The village church dates from the foundation of Elstow Abbey in 1078 . It was extensively restored in 1880 , but the Perpendicular font in which Bunyan was baptized on 30 November 1628 is still there. The Bunyan memorial windows in the N and S aisles illustrating The Holy War and The Pilgrim's Progress were added in 1880 . The Moot Hall on the green, a medieval market hall and manorial court,...

Commonplace Book

Commonplace Book   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
297 words

...our studies—in accounts—in diet—and in cleanliness.’ Trollope made a particular point of the need for order in careful monetary accounting. The young man entering life, he advised, ‘wd. make no bad bargain in dividing half his last shilling to buying a red book with blue perpendicular lines—Those blue lines so hated by the young gentry of small fortunes, would fill themselves with figures on the right sheet, were they properly attended to in every monetary transaction.’ The future Post Office surveyor would maintain meticulous records of his expenditures on...

Caunterbury

Caunterbury   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...church, and several times rebuilt and reconstructed. The choir was begun by the French master mason William of Sens in 1175 in the Gothic style and completed by William the Englishman in 1179–84 . A new nave was built during Chaucer's time by Henry Yevele in the Perpendicular style ( see architecture ). The elaborate shrine of Becket, at which healing miracles were regularly reported, stood in Trinity Chapel behind the high altar from 1220 until 1538 , when it was destroyed by Henry VIII . Pilgrims entered by the West Gate of the walled town...

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