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Overview

Perpendicular

Denoting the latest stage of English Gothic church architecture, prevalent from the late 14th to mid 16th centuries and characterized by broad arches, elaborate fan vaulting, and large ...

English architecture

English architecture   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Renaissance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)
Length:
726 words

...into three phases: Early English, Decorated, and Perpendicular. The Perpendicular architecture of late medieval England is so called from the upright lines of the window tracery and the panels of churches, and is sometimes divided into Early Perpendicular in the late fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries (e.g. the chancel of Gloucester Cathedral) and Late Perpendicular in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries (e.g. King's College Chapel in Cambridge). The most striking feature of Late Perpendicular architecture is the fan vault, of which there are...

perspective

perspective   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Renaissance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)
Length:
948 words

...apart from some reliefs by Donatello , seems to be the earliest use of perspective construction. It seems likely that what Brunelleschi had discovered was that the perspective images of lines that in reality run perpendicular to the plane of the picture (that is, images of ‘orthogonals’) converge at a point that is the foot of the perpendicular from the eye of the ideal observer to the picture plane. Perspective pictures still convey a sense of depth even if the observer is rather far from the ideal viewing position built into the construction. It is hardly...

surveying

surveying   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Renaissance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)
Length:
631 words

...(which is not very likely for a plot of land) breaking the shape down into triangles is the most reliable way of finding the area. The calculations in abacus books always relate to measurements of length, never using angles except for the right angles involved in constructing perpendiculars. This probably reflects actual practice, since measuring a length was straightforward whereas instruments capable of measuring an angle other than a right angle to a useful degree of accuracy were relatively uncommon, and probably expensive; the one most often referred to in...

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