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Mike Bidlo

(b Chicago, IL, 20 Oct 1953), painter, sculptor and performance artist. Bidlo was educated at the University of Illinois and at Teachers College at Columbia University in New ...

Bidlo, Mike

Bidlo, Mike (20 Oct 1953)   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of American Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
360 words

...Levine . In 1984 he recreated Warhol's Factory, and in 1988 he exhibited 80 copies of Picasso's paintings of women. Bibliography Mike Bidlo: Picasso's Women, 1901–1971 (exh. cat., essays R. Pincus-Witten , B. Jakobson and R. Rosenblum ; New York, Leo Castelli Gal., 1988) Mike Bidlo: Masterpieces (exh. cat., essay R. Rosenblum and interview by C. McCormick , Zurich, Gal. Bruno Bischofberger, 1989) Mike Bidlo, Manuel Ocampo, Andres Serrano: The Saatchi Collection (exh. cat., essays S. Kent , London, Saatchi Gal., 1991) Morgan...

Mike Bidlo

Mike Bidlo  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(b Chicago, IL, 20 Oct 1953),painter, sculptor and performance artist. Bidlo was educated at the University of Illinois and at Teachers College at Columbia University in New York. He ...
Taaffe, Philip

Taaffe, Philip (1955)   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of American Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
337 words

...which also involved artists such as Terry Winters , Ross Bleckner , Juan Uslé and Peter Halley . In the early 1980s he began to incorporate found images and designs into his work, a strategy that linked him to contemporary “Appropriationists” such as Sherrie Levine and Mike Bidlo . Martyr Group ( 1983 ; S. and G. Fineberg priv. col., see 2000 exh. cat., p. 81) is an important example, in which he borrowed the form of targets used in police shooting ranges to establish a design against which he grouped figures in a patterned crowd. Long an admirer of...

Sturtevant, Elaine

Sturtevant, Elaine (1930)   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of American Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
474 words

... Joseph Beuys . Sturtevant's earlier work was reappraised in the 1980s with the emergence of the Appropriationist Movement, of which she now appeared to be the founder although she always sought to distance herself from this alliance with artists such as Sherrie Levine or Mike Bidlo . While she recognized the influence of Duchamp and a shared motivation in moving away from the art object as an end in itself, she professed to be fascinated above all with the notion of the original and the aura of authenticity that it projects. Bibliography B. Arning : “...

Contemporary Art

Contemporary Art   Reference library

Thomas McEvilley, Jeremy Gilbert-Rolfe, and Sherri Irvin

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
12,562 words

...artist as the embodiment or instrument of progress. Around 1982 , artists such as Sherrie Levine and Mike Bidlo began making and exhibiting quotational works. Levine copied works by canonical male artists—Fernand Léger, Paul Klee, and others—but altered the medium, employing, instead of oil and canvas, watercolor and paper in a reduced size. She had transposed the icons of male innovation into smaller, delicate, and less declarative feminine modes. Bidlo, by contrast, performing homage to the supposedly masculine force of Genius, copied classical modernist...

Contemporary Art

Contemporary Art   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
11,920 words

...the embodiment or instrument of progress. Around 1982 , artists such as Sherry Levine and Mike Bidlo began making and exhibiting quotational works. [ See Appropriation .] Levine copied works by canonical male artists— Fernand Léger , Paul Klee , and others—but altered the medium, employing, instead of oil and canvas, watercolor and paper in a reduced size. She had transposed the icons of male innovation into smaller, delicate, and less declarative feminine modes. Bidlo, by contrast, performing homage to the supposedly masculine force of Genius, copied...

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