You are looking at 1-20 of 37 entries  for:

  • All: Joking Apart x
  • Language reference x
clear all

View:

Overview

Joking Apart

A: Alan Ayckbourn Pf: 1978, Scarborough Pb: 1979 G: Com. in ...

pass muster

pass muster   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
389 words

...Litt , “The Mall, Unhallowed,” Plain Dealer (Cleveland), 11 May 1997 , at I8. Quite apart from that error, the phrase invites condiment-inspired puns—e.g.: “The seventh and newest Wienermobile to crisscross America is a bite-sized vehicle compared to Oscar Mayer's beloved hot-dog fleet. But the ‘mini’ has proved this summer to, um, pass mustard .” Tom Alesia , “Oscar Mayer Takes Bite Out of Wienermobile,” Wis. State J . , 6 Aug. 2008 , at A1. Sadly, it's no joke sometimes—e.g.: • “Asked about albums he digs from the past decade, [Joel] O’Keeffe cites...

Phrasal Verb

Phrasal Verb   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to the English Language (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Language reference, History of English, Linguistics
Length:
2,955 words

...literally in The milkman brought in the milk , figuratively in The prime minister brought in a new policy . Only in the second sense can bring in be matched with introduce (itself originally metaphorical in Latin): not * The milkman introduced the milk , unless a joke is intended. Jokes and cartoons are often based on a deliberate confusion of phrasal-verb meanings: as when someone says, ‘ Put the kettle on ’ (taken to mean heat some water in a kettle for tea), then notes with appreciation, ‘Mmm, it suits you’ (crossing over to putting on clothes and...

Scots

Scots   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to the English Language (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Language reference, History of English, Linguistics
Length:
4,432 words

...or restore the full Scots of a dwindling minority of rural speakers to its former central position. Even after its 20c renaissance, Scots remains restricted to a narrow sphere of literary uses and it makes only a marginal appearance in the media, in comic strips, cartoons, jokes and columns in the popular and local press. None the less, although English is dominant, it remains permeated with features from Scots. Pronunciation (1) Like other Northern dialects, Scots displays the results of many early divergences from the Midland and Southern dialects of...

either

either   Reference library

Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
883 words

...item being itemized so that the clauses following either and or are exactly parallel in structure; other usage writers have made the same claim. So, in his example sentence You are either joking or have forgotten the clauses are not parallel, because the subject you has been left out of the second one, but the clauses are parallel in Either you are joking or you have forgotten . In examples such as this, repeating the grammatical subject will, to my mind, make the sentence rather starchy, while leaving it out seems justified by a natural process of...

ta!

ta! excl.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
113 words

...child […] You would not say ‘Ta’ to me for my congratulations. 1943 R. Llewellyn None But the Lonely Heart 184: ‘Ta, Ma,’ Reg says. 1959 W. Hall Long and the Short and the Tall Act I: mitchem : Fag? johnstone : (taking the cigarette) Ta. 1978 A. Ayckbourn Joking Apart II ii: Yes, ta. Leave it there for me. 1981 T. Wilkinson Down and Out 52: ‘Yeah, ta,’ she replied. 1999 Indep. 6 Sept. 20: ‘Have you got a light? […] Ta,’ said the...

wee

wee n.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
450 words

...var. pee n. 1 (1)] ( mainly juv. ) urine, urination. 1937–84 Partridge DSUE ( 1984 ) 1315/1: late C.19–20. 1945 joke cited in G. Legman Rationale of the Dirty Joke ( 1972 ) I 303: Wee-wee my ass! Where the hell is the nearest whore-house! 1960 N. Hilliard Maori Girl 14: Netta's rude . She said wee-wee . 1969 J. Hibberd Dimboola ( 2000 ) 77: Mummy, I want to have a wee. 1978 A. Ayckbourn Joking Apart I i: Christopher did a wee-wee in the fireworks. 1979 J. Morrow Confessions of Proinsias O'Toole 40: We'll have a wee...

rubbish

rubbish adj.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
201 words

...a rubbishing song! 1945 J.B. Priestly Three Men in New Suits 68: They have money to spend – drink, football, pools, dogs, any rubbishy thing they fancy. 1963 N. Dunn Up the Junction 60: I could tell they were rubbish directly they looked in. 1978 A. Ayckbourn Joking Apart II i: He's a rubbish player. You can beat him. 1986 F. Taylor Auf Wiedersehen Pet Two 146: You not only are rubbish, you talk rubbish as well. 1999 Indep. Rev. 2 July 8: They never expected I would defend myself. It's a rubbish, rubbish, rubbish case. 2009 J....

buzz off

buzz off v.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
256 words

...Oh, all right, blast you, buzz off if you want to. 1953 K. Tennant Joyful Condemned 99: Well, you better buzz off […] Or I'll take you for consorting. 1961 ‘ Frank Richards ’ Billy Bunter at Butlins 39: No, don't buzz off for a minute, Bunter. 1978 A. Ayckbourn Joking Apart ll ii: Well, I think that's as good a cue as any for us all to buzz off and leave you to your party, Debbie. 2 in fig. use, to die. 1969 N. Spinrad Bug Jack Barron 23: How many of us in the good old US of A buzz off worth five hundred...

whacker

whacker n. 5   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
170 words

...honkoes over at the Mont, they're only wackers. 1986 R. Beckett Dinkum Aussie Dict. 7: Barbie […] Regarded with universal scorn by those who slaver over bistecca alla Fiorentina, which is exactly the same thing apart from the fact that it is done indoors and served by some whacker wearing a dinner jacket. 1996 Penguin Bk of More Aus. Jokes 342: We call him Whacker the Australian, or Whack for short. 2 a person who is seriously mentally unstable. 1965 W. Dick Bunch of Ratbags 67: I was still scared stiff of this wacker. He seemed a bit crazy. ...

peaky

peaky adj.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
288 words

...Stivens Scholarly Mouse and other Tales 46: Look a bit peaky, both of you. I'll take you in hand. Long bouncy walks for both of you will be the cure. 1960 H.E. Bates When the Green Woods Laugh ( 1985 ) 287: You look a bit peaky, Mr Jerebohm . 1978 A. Ayckbourn Joking Apart II i: You've been very peaky lately. Can't we have a proper holiday sometime? 1989 T. Blacker Fixx 198: You're looking a bit peaky these days. 1993 I. Welsh Trainspotting 247: You look a bit peaky. Probably just a touch of this little bug that's doing the rounds....

fluky

fluky adj.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
505 words

...she said. […] I said: ‘No, I don't think so. It would have been a very fluky shot, even if he happened to have the camera in his hand.’ 1968 G. Slatter Pagan Game ( 1969 ) 186: I refuse to clap for a fluky try that came from our stupidity. 1978 A. Ayckbourn Joking Apart II i: Sorry. A bit flukey. 1989 T. Blacker Fixx 171: Her celebrity […] was a passing, fluky sort of thing. 1999 Guardian Friday Rev. 11 June 14: It may have been flukey. 2002 G. Villemure Tales from the Ranger Locker Room 27: We were down 3-0, The Cat took me...

pommie

pommie n.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
889 words

... B. Chatwin Songlines 62: ‘You and me could be mates,’ […] he said, ‘You're not a whingeing Pom, Bru.’ 1993 K. Lette Foetal Attraction ( 1994 ) 10: No daughter of mine will ever be susceptible to a bad-punning Pom with straight teeth. 1996 Penguin Bk of More Aus. Jokes 241: The pommy was not long in Australia before he heard that the duck-shooting season was about to start. 1999 Guardian G2 30 June 3: Chants of ‘Pommie go home’. 2000 Guardian G2 6 Jan. 19: Three pommies joined together to name […] Bradman for the great Australian...

snoot

snoot n.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
814 words

...of the Dirty Joke ( 1972 ) I 156: Nose-thumbing […] of Italian origin, it is variously called la fica , the fig; fa 'n'gul (dialectal italian for I fuck [you] in the ass ); ‘biting the thumb’ ( Romeo & Juliet I. i), ‘cocking snooks,’ ‘taking a grinder,’ and, most commonly nowadays, ‘thumbing the nose’. 1979 G. Wolff Duke of Deception ( 1990 ) 235: How we loved that, cocking a snoot at Them as we drank ruinously expensive and flat bitter. 1987 (con. 1920s) L. Redmond Emerald Square 57: The native Irish with eyes wide apart, staring in...

knee

knee n.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
856 words

...2 69: Cool kneebangers, brah! knee pad ( v. ) ( US black ) to beg. 1953 L. Durst Jives of Dr. Hepcat ( 1989 ) 6: Understand, I don't want to knee pad but the score is piling up and its relief I crave. knee-slapper ( n. ) [such a joke makes the listener slap their knee with delight] ( US ) an uproarious joke, often used ironically. 1966 New Yorker 5 Nov. 128: ‘How's the World Treating You’, an English comedy at the Music Box, is full of knee-slappers like that one [OED]. 1970 W. Burroughs Jr Speed 84: I needed a phone book which the guard...

ring the changes

ring the changes v. (UK Und.)   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
804 words

...one doing a couple of lively rounds and then excusing himself for a moment, and in that moment the changes were rung. 1928 M.C. Sharpe Chicago May ( 1929 ) 263: Then I rang the changes: Miss M. V. Churchill ; Mrs. May V. ditto ; M. Vivienne . 1978 A. Ayckbourn Joking Apart II i: Thought I'd ring the...

rooster

rooster n.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
902 words

...You got cock for d' rooster, pussy for d' tomcat, and you got dat heifer for d' bull. It take two to tango! 1993 B. Moore Lex. of Cadet Lang. 305: rooster 1. the penis (i.e., a play on cock ). (c) ( US ) a sexually active man; also as adj. 1898 F. Dumont Dumont's Joke Book 11: Go on! Kiss a girl through the telephone? […] It might suit an old bald-headed rooster like you, but I want my electricity fresh from the battery. 1906 S. Ford Shorty McCabe 83: The Boss was a good deal of a rooster himself, with real money enough to buy up a whole...

poo

poo n. 1   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
1,186 words

...I had already taken to flushing the toilet twice […] just in case the ablutions inspector had a periscope up the poo-poo pipe. 1999 Guardian Guide 26 June–2 July 98: The plethora of pee, poo and vomit gags. 2000 Guardian Rev. 21 Apr. 16: If Mr Hanky 's poo-poo jokes make you fall apart, you won't believe your luck. 4 in fig. use, rubbish, nonsense. 1974 (con. 1940s) E. Thompson Tattoo ( 1977 ) 202: ‘We will win this year.’ ‘No way.’ ‘Poo on you.’ 1993 J. Mowry Six Out Seven ( 1994 ) 362: ‘Dog-poo,’ said Lactameon . That was one crazy-ass...

sick

sick adj. 1   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
1,247 words

...some sick joke against themselves. 1987 ‘ Joe Bob Briggs ’ Joe Bob Goes to the Drive-In 61: Night of the Living Dead ( 1968 ): […] banned in several cities because it's sick . 1993 I. Welsh Trainspotting 181: The Sick Boy is going round tae Marianne's the night for some sick fun. Doggy style must certainly be on the menu. 1999 Guardian Weekend 26 June 3: Selling pornography in sweet shops […] I think it's such a sick and stupid thing. 2006 E. St Aubyn Mothers Milk 229: Two pot-bellied policemen training an Alsatian to tear apart any sick...

rip

rip v.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
1,695 words

...rip loose ( v. ) see tear loose under tear v. rip on ( v. ) 1 ( US campus ) to criticize (behind someone's back), to nag. 1989 P. Munro Sl. U. 160: When those two get together they totally rip on Jeff. 1997–2000 Da Bomb [Internet] Rippin'. Mocking; telling jokes about. 2 ( US black ) to harass, to insult. 1980 E. Folb Runnin' Down Some Lines 119: He a righteous gorilla! […] Rip on young ladies too. He crazy! rip out ( v. ) ( US ) to talk without restraint, to swear. 1868 H.L. Williams Black-Eyed Beauty 23: When a refined...

grinder

grinder n. 1   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
1,628 words

...) 405: Mr. Jackson […] applying his left thumb to the tip of his nose, worked a visionary coffee-mill with his right hand: thereby performing a very graceful piece of pantomime […] which was familiarly denominated ‘taking a grinder’. 1968 G. Legman Rationale of the Dirty Joke ( 1972 ) I 156: Nose-thumbing […] of Italian origin, it is variously called la fica , the fig; fa'n'gul (dialectal italian for I fuck [ you ] in the ass ); ‘biting the thumb’ ( Romeo & Juliet I. i), ‘cocking snooks,’ ‘taking a grinder,’ and, most commonly nowadays,...

View: