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Joking Apart

A: Alan Ayckbourn Pf: 1978, Scarborough Pb: 1979 G: Com. in ...

Husbands

Husbands   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Humorous Quotations (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
1,383 words

...is having one husband too many. Monogamy is the same. Anonymous : Erica Jong Fear of Flying (1973) bigamy is having one husband one husband too many monogamy is the same If a woman laughs at her husband’s joke, it means he has told a new joke or he has a new wife. Anonymous : saying laughs at her husband’s joke laughs at her husband’s joke I married beneath me, all women do. Nancy Astor 1879 – 1964 American -born British Conservative politician : in Dictionary of National Biography 1961–1970 (1981) I married beneath me I married...

Robert Frost

Robert Frost (1874–1963)   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
1,361 words

...we see in life Is due to truths being in and out of favour. ‘The Black Cottage’ (1914) change we think we see truths being in and out of favour truths being in and out of favour Forgive, O Lord, my little jokes on Thee And I'll forgive Thy great big one on me. ‘Cluster of Faith’ (1962) forgive , O Lord, my little jokes Forgive, O Lord, my little jokes And nothing to look backward to with pride, And nothing to look forward to with hope. ‘The Death of the Hired Man’ (1914) nothing to look backward to look backward to with pride nothing to look forward to...

God

God   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
2,054 words

...Hall (the Mathematical Institute), Princeton University God is subtle but not malicious God is subtle but not malicious God is subtle but not malicious Forgive, O Lord, my little jokes on Thee And I'll forgive Thy great big one on me. Robert Frost 1874 – 1963 American poet ‘Cluster of Faith’ (1962) forgive , O Lord, my little jokes Forgive, O Lord, my little jokes God, to me, it seems, is a verb not a noun, proper or improper. R. Buckminster Fuller 1895 – 1983 American designer and architect No More Secondhand God (1963) (untitled poem...

Art

Art   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Humorous Quotations (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
2,099 words

...in Croppy Acre Park, Dublin Anonymous : comment, c. 1988 floozie in the jacuzzi floozie in the jacuzzi Oh, I wish I could draw. I've always wanted to draw. I'd give my right arm to be able to draw. It must be very relaxing. Alan Ayckbourn 1939 – English dramatist : Joking Apart (1979) give my right arm give my right arm right arm to draw Of course he [ William Morris ] was a wonderful all-round man, but the act of walking round him has always tired me. Max Beerbohm 1872 – 1956 English critic , essayist , and caricaturist : letter to...

W.B. Yeats

W.B. Yeats (18651939)   Reference library

Brewer's Famous Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
723 words

...Softly for you Tread on My Jokes (1966), a collection of articles by Malcolm Muggeridge When I was young, I had not given a penny for a song Did not the poet sing it with such airs That one believed he had a sword upstairs. ‘All Things Can Tempt Me’ (1910). Hence, A Penny for a Song , title of play (1951) by John Whiting Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold; Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world … The best lack all conviction, while the worst Are full of passionate intensity. ‘The Second Coming’ (1921). Hence, Things Fall Apart , title of a novel (1958)...

Robert Frost

Robert Frost (1874–1963)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
1,373 words

...we see in life Is due to truths being in and out of favour. ‘The Black Cottage’ (1914) change we think we see truths being in and out of favour truths being in and out of favour Forgive, O Lord, my little jokes on Thee And I'll forgive Thy great big one on me. ‘Cluster of Faith’ (1962) forgive , O Lord, my little jokes Forgive, O Lord, my little jokes And nothing to look backward to with pride, And nothing to look forward to with hope. ‘The Death of the Hired Man’ (1914) nothing to look backward to look backward to with pride nothing to look forward to...

Robert Frost

Robert Frost (1874–1963)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
1,234 words

...And nothing to look backward to with pride, And nothing to look forward to with hope. The Death of the Hired Man , 1914 The snake stood up for evil in the Garden. The Ax-Helve , 1923 Something there is that doesn't love a wall. Apart from the symbolic resonance, Frost was referring literally to the tendency of stone walls to fall apart. He disliked the outdated state requirement that he help his neighbor to rebuild a stone wall Mending Wall , 1914 We go to college to be given one more chance to learn to read in case we haven't learned in high school. cited in...

1st Duke of Wellington

1st Duke of Wellington (17691852)   Reference library

Brewer's Famous Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
1,868 words

...long Nobbs, who ‘keeps’ on the same staircase) . ‘Mr. Nibbs, I believe?’ Nobbs (who is six feet one, and rowed a trifle over twelve stone at Putney, the other day) . ‘Then, my good fellow, you'll believe anything!’ Now, it was not unknown for Punch cartoonists to take existing jokes and make something quite new of them, but is that what happened here? Or was the Wellington anecdote based on the cartoon situation? I note in passing that Mr Nobbs has something of a resemblance in the nose to the Great Duke, and the (anonymous) cartoonist has shaded it quite...

Lord Byron

Lord Byron (1788–1824)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
6,590 words

...fools are my theme Fools are my theme let satire be my song let satire be my song A man must serve his time to every trade Save censure—critics all are ready made. Take hackneyed jokes from Miller, got by rote, With just enough of learning to misquote. English Bards and Scotch Reviewers (1809) l. 63 critics all are ready made hackneyed jokes from Miller hackneyed jokes from miller enough of learning to misquote enough of learning to misquote Who, both by precept and example, shows That prose is verse, and verse is merely prose, Convincing all by...

Mark Twain

Mark Twain (1835–1910)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
5,817 words

...letter to Asa Don Dickinson, Nov. 21, 1905 A baby is an inestimable blessing and bother. letter to Annie Webster, Sept. 1, 1876 In Boston they ask, How much does he know? In New York, How much is he worth? In Philadelphia, Who were his parents? Twain identifies this as a familiar joke What Paul Bourget Thinks of Us , 1895 We asked a passenger who belonged there what sort of a place it was. “Well,” said he, after considering, and with the air of one who wishes to take time and be accurate, “It's a hell of a place.” A description which was photographic for...

(Sir) Winston Churchill

(Sir) Winston Churchill (18741965)   Reference library

Brewer's Famous Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
7,872 words

...Attlee. Quoted in Willans & Roetter, The Wit of Winston Churchill (1954). According to Safire (1980), however, Churchill told Sir Denis Brogan that he had said it not about Attlee but about Ramsay MacDonald, with rather more point. If so, it would appear that he was quoting a joke made by the humorous columnist Beachcomber in about 1936. Aneurin Bevan alluded to this same source in about 1937 – ‘Beachcomber once described Mr Ramsay MacDonald as … It applies to many of the front-bench men with whom the Parliamentary Labour Party is cursed’ – quoted in...

Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln (1809–65)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
4,152 words

...the greatest or best man in America, but rather that they have decided it is not best to swap horses while crossing the river, and have further concluded that I am not so poor a horse that they might not make a botch of it in trying to swap.” The metaphor apparently stems from a joke, popular in the 1840s, about an Irishman (or Dutchman) who was crossing a river with a mare and a colt. Falling off the mare, he grabbed the colt's tail. Observers on the riverbank shouted that he should take hold of the mare's tail as she was the stronger swimmer. The man...

Anonymous

Anonymous   Reference library

Brewer's Famous Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
22,707 words

...appearing over his grave in St Thomas's churchyard, Winchelsea, East Sussex. I Told You I Was Ill was the title of a Milligan memorial tribute at Guildhall, London (15 September 2002). Whatever the case, it should be obvious from the foregoing that Milligan did not originate the joke. By 2004, however, it was revealed that Milligan now rested under a Celtic cross but with his epitaph tastefully put in Irish Gaelic: ‘ Duirt me leat go raibh me breoite ’, together with the English words, ‘Love, light, peace’. In the same year, Anne Tayler wrote to me: ‘In the...

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