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Joking Apart

A: Alan Ayckbourn Pf: 1978, Scarborough Pb: 1979 G: Com. in ...

Joking Apart

Joking Apart (1978)   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Plays (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... Apart Author: Alan Ayckbourn Date/place of 1st performance: 1978 , Scarborough Date of 1st publication: 1979 Genre: Com. in 2 acts Setting/time of action: English garden, 1966–78 Cast: 4m, 7f (4 roles to be played by same actress) Richard Clarke and Anthea , a divorcee with two children, are a charming and successful couple in their twenties. They have invited people to their bonfire party: their new neighbours, Revd Hugh and Louise Emerson, their old friend Brian with his latest girlfriend Melody, and Sven and Olive Holmenson. Sven,...

Joking Apart

Joking Apart  

A: Alan Ayckbourn Pf: 1978, Scarborough Pb: 1979 G: Com. in 2 acts S: English garden, 1966–78 C: 4m, 7f (4 roles to be played by same actress)Richard Clarke and Anthea, a divorcee with two children, ...
A Midsummer Night’s Dream

A Midsummer Night’s Dream   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,220 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...must include the moonshine by which the lovers meet and the wall through whose cranny they speak. As they rehearse, Robin arrives, and mischievously transforms Bottom’s head into that of an ass. Bottom cannot understand why his colleagues flee, assuming they are playing a joke, and sings to keep up his courage. Titania awakens, sees Bottom, and falls in love with him: she appoints four fairies to be his attendants and leads him away to her bower. 3.2 Robin tells a delighted Oberon of Titania’s love for the transformed Bottom, but when Hermia arrives,...

The Comedy of Errors

The Comedy of Errors   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,835 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...have arrived in Ephesus: Antipholus sends his servant to their lodging to lock up his money. Shortly afterwards Dromio of Ephesus arrives and, mistaking this Antipholus for his own master, calls him home to dinner. Antipholus of Syracuse, thinking this is his own Dromio having a joke, grows angry, asking anxiously after his money, and drives Dromio away with blows before setting off to check on his belongings. 2.1 Adriana laments the continuing absence of her husband Antipholus of Ephesus to her unmarried sister Luciana, and after Dromio of Ephesus brings the...

Ayckbourn, Alan

Ayckbourn, Alan (1939– )   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Writers and their Works (3 ed.)

...Living Together ; Round and Round the Garden ] ( 1973 ) Drama Absent Friends ( 1974 ) Drama Confusions ( 1974 ) Drama Jeeves / By Jeeves ( 1975 ) Drama Bedroom Farce ( 1975 ) Drama Just Between Ourselves ( 1976 ) Drama Ten Times Table ( 1977 ) Drama Joking Apart ( 1978 ) Drama Sisterly Feelings , [and] Taking Steps ( 1979 ) Drama Suburban Strains ( 1980 ) Drama Season's Greetings ( 1980 ) Drama Way Upstream ( 1981 ) Drama Making Tracks ( 1981 ) Drama Intimate Exchanges ( 1982 ) Drama It Could Be Any One Of Us...

Events while Guarding the Bofors Gun

Events while Guarding the Bofors Gun  

A: John McGrath Pf: 1966, London Pb: 1966 G: Drama in 2 acts S: Gun-park in British Zone, Germany, 1954 C: 11mLance-Bombardier Terry Evans is at 18 ‘a nice boy, trying hard to be liked, but not ...
Alan Ayckbourn

Alan Ayckbourn  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1939– ),playwright. His first London success, Relatively Speaking (1967, pub. 1968), was followed by many others, including Absurd Person Singular (1973, pub. 1974); The Norman Conquests (1974, pub. ...
America Hurrah

America Hurrah  

AT: (1) Pavane; (3) America Hurrah A: Jean-Claude van Itallie Pf: (1 and 2) 1965, New York; (3) 1966, New York Pb: 1967 G: 3 satires in 1 act S: (1) Interview room, street, gymnasium, subway, ...
Collins, William Wilkie

Collins, William Wilkie (1824–89)   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
130 words

... Trollope character was a novel's primary motivator ( Auto XIII). Dissimilar in temperament as well as fictional approaches, Collins found Trollope 's boisterousness hard to take. ‘To me he was an incarnate gale of wind. He blew off my hat; he turned my umbrella inside out. Joking apart, as good and staunch a friend as ever lived’ ( I & R 127). RCT R. C....

War in the Air, The, and particularly How Mr. Bert Smallways Fared While it Lasted

War in the Air, The, and particularly How Mr. Bert Smallways Fared While it Lasted (1908)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Edwardian Fiction

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...sense: ‘there was us in Europe, all at sixes and sevens with our silly flags and our silly newspapers raggin’ us up against each other and keepin ‘us apart.’ Smallways partly represents the ordinary person trapped in the struggle for world domination, but by pitching his humour against the potential horror of total war, Wells preserves a gleam of hope for the future (and provides another prophetic image: the joking Cockney survivors of the Blitz). A sort of extravaganza, The War in the Air is also a realistic description of the lowest and poorest side of...

Titanic

Titanic   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Hardy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
446 words

...occurs in the second line, and this theme dominates what follows. As for his vision of the luxury liner resting at the bottom of the Atlantic, the emphasis falls so strongly on the persistency and survival of the non-human world that the effect is almost that of a grim Darwinian joke: ‘Over the mirrors meant | To glass the opulent | The sea-worm crawls—grotesque, slimed, dumb, indifferent.’ A public subject has been treated from an entirely unpredictable and wholly personal angle: Hardy has appropriated the historical event and made it his own, the specificity...

Ayckbourn, Alan

Ayckbourn, Alan (1939– )   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Literature in English

Reference type:
Subject Reference

...the impact of a recently bereaved young man on unhappily married friends; Bedroom Farce ( 1975 ), another play about marital pains and confusions; Just Between Ourselves ( 1976 ), about a woman reduced to catatonic insensibility by her husband and envious mother-in-law; Joking Apart ( 1978 ), about the ability of the happy and successful to damage those around them; Sisterly Feelings ( 1979 ), a comedy about sibling rivalry, and also a play of chance and permutations, since the cast is required to play alternate scenes, depending on the fall of a coin...

Through the Looking-Glass

Through the Looking-Glass   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Children's Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
652 words

...story on a chess game grew out of impromptu tales about chessmen, told to Alice Liddell and her sisters in the days when (in her own words) ‘we were excitedly learning chess’. The device of going through the looking-glass, upon which many of the story’s nonsensical inventions and jokes are based, is supposed to have been suggested to Dodgson by a remark made to him by a young cousin, Alice Raikes, probably in 1868 . Standing her in front of a mirror, and giving her an orange, he asked her ‘which hand the little girl you see there has got it in’. She remarked...

Europe, western

Europe, western   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
1,006 words

...service, and he soon included Switzerland and Italy. Though upper-class travellers looked down on these tourists, thousands of men and especially women of modest means became better acquainted with European neighbours and their ways. A proudly independent traveller, Trollope joked in The Eustace Diamonds , ‘Switzerland and the Tyrol, and even Italy, are all redolent of Mr Cook ’ (XXXII). Many of the British did more than just travel in Europe. For a long time English workmen, especially those involved in railway construction, could find jobs in Europe,...

MILNE, A. A.

MILNE, A. A. (1882–1956)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Children's Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
1,931 words

...The job was in fact comparatively menial, apart from the writing of his own contributions, for the then Editor, Owen Seaman (‘a strange, unlucky man’, who has sometimes been suggested as a model for Eeyore in the Pooh stories), was particularly active in the office. But Milne now had an assured income, and was ‘very young, very light-hearted, confident of myself, confident of the future’. In 1913 , he married Dorothy (‘Daphne’) de Sélincourt, Owen Seaman’s god-daughter. Because she laughed at his jokes—‘she had my contributions to Punch by heart...

Steig, William

Steig, William   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
1,283 words
Illustration(s):
1

...William ( 1907–2003 ), versatile “sublime doodler,” writer, and artist who delineated child and adult experience in varying formats through eight decades of publication. His single-frame joke cartoons (1930s), self-named “symbolic drawings” (primarily 1940s and 1950s), picture storybooks (1960s to 1990s), long narratives for children (1970s), and retrospective picture-book anecdotes and memoirs (1980s to 2000s) expressed the pain, joy, and humor of human existence to general, adult, and child audiences. William Steig . Illustration from The Agony in the...

FitzGerald, Edward

FitzGerald, Edward   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
2,284 words

...of quotations that FitzGerald evidently admired. However, his own attempts at producing similarly quotable gems are dubious: “The grand Truisms of life only life itself is said to bring to life” may be an amusing truism itself, but is a roundabout joke that implies the futility of collecting either truisms or jokes. FitzGerald's Translations With Six Dramas of Calderón ( 1853 ), FitzGerald began the series of creative translations from various languages that are his primary claim to fame. His translations, which were free recreations rather than literal...

Frost, Robert

Frost, Robert (1874–1963)   Reference library

William Pritchard

The Oxford Companion to Modern Poetry (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
2,036 words

... * Robinson that ‘his life was a revel in the felicities of language’, and surely the claim could be made, even more appropriately, of Frost himself. While standing apart from the modernist work of his famous contemporaries— * Eliot , Pound , * Stevens —his own poetry, in its complication of tone and its delicate balancing of gravity and wit (‘I am never more serious than when joking’, he said more than once), asks for constant vigilance on the reader's part: a listening ear for the special postures of speech and the dramatic effects of silences. Like...

comedy in Trollope's work

comedy in Trollope's work   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
2,026 words

...in fact, they seldom do and generally live by only if they are fools or monomaniacs ( CR XVI). Trollope further found plots pointing too resolutely toward completed actions, fulfilments, a drive quite contrary to comic openness. Thus he very often ends a romantic comedy with jokes about endings, about marriages, or about the artificiality of the whole thing. In short, plots or external actions are too gross to account for the really important aspects of life: the tiny daily acts of kindness and sensitivity (or the reverse) that make up the moral life. These...

Englishness, Dickens's

Englishness, Dickens's   Reference library

Philip Collins

Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
3,167 words

...characters may originate in or make forays into the provinces, always to towns or areas Dickens knew. The novels also use countries he had visited ( America , Italy , France ) but never Scotland, Wales, or Ireland , and surprisingly he never resorts to the traditional English jokes about Scottish stinginess, Irish blarney and stupidity, and Welsh wiliness and verbosity. Mrs Woodcourt ( Bleak House ) is a feeble attempt at Welshness; otherwise he showed no interest in the Welsh, but seems to have held the common English view that Scotsmen were rational if...

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