You are looking at 1-4 of 4 entries  for:

  • All: Joking Apart x
  • Military History x
clear all

View:

Overview

Joking Apart

A: Alan Ayckbourn Pf: 1978, Scarborough Pb: 1979 G: Com. in ...

Germany

Germany   Reference library

Jürgen Förster, Charles Messenger (Armed Forces), and Wolfgang Petter (Culture)

The Oxford Companion to World War II

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Military History, Social sciences, Warfare and Defence
Length:
21,337 words
Illustration(s):
3

...and to act against their supreme commander. The increasing number of defeats on all fronts after 1942–3 helped the conspirators to win sympathisers for their cause. More were prepared to follow suit after someone else had successfully attempted a coup d'état . A Berlin joke of 1944 reflects the attitude of the general public: ‘I'd rather believe in victory than run around with my head cut off.’ historiography tries to define different forms of resistance to Nazism: political opposition, social non-conformity, and ideological dissidence. They can...

intelligence, military

intelligence, military   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...military Among the hoariest military jokes is that these two words are a contradiction in terms. Military intelligence means information, usually but not exclusively about the enemy, and without both information and the cerebral intelligence to make proper use of it, any commander is halfway to defeat. Among the obstacles that good intelligence must overcome in order to be applied are prejudice, as in US Secretary of State Stimson's statement that ‘gentlemen do not read each other's mail’, preconceptions in the commander's mind that will shut it...

Shipboard Organization

Shipboard Organization   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Military History
Length:
12,712 words

...the ship was out of coastal waters his power was described by many writers as being akin to that of an absolute monarch. Even in most modern navies the captain remains an aloof figure of authority, his apartness perhaps best illustrated by the fact that on large ships he (or, now, she) usually eats alone in a uniquely grand and spacious cabin, entirely apart from the other officers socializing in their wardroom mess. Watches, Quarters, Messes, and Divisions Rules for the government of ships were initially drawn up by individual captains, and this led to...

War Art

War Art   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Australian Military History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...Others, such as George Lambert in the First World War and Murray Griffin and Louis Kahan in the Second, made drawings of fellow soldiers as gifts for them to send home to relatives and as a means of achieving a small measure of immortality. Still others created visual jokes about the situation, drawings to entertain their mates and to help them momentarily forget the horrors of war. Some made paintings because visual ideas about the war preoccupied them: Lambert remarked: I must go on painting Palestine subjects, not because there is a readier market...

View: