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Overview

Johnson's Dictionary

By Samuel Johnson, published 1755. In 1746 Johnson contracted with Robert Dodsley and other booksellers to write an English dictionary, for a fee of £1,575. A ‘Plan’ and dedication to ... ...

nymphaeum

nymphaeum  

[MC]Generally, any place consecrated to nymphs, especially natural places such as a spring, river, mountain, or tree. In classical times it often took the form of an elaborately decorated ...
apse

apse  

A large semicircular or polygonal recess in a church, arched or with a domed roof and typically at the church's eastern end. Recorded from the early 19th century, the word comes from Latin apsis ...
Indo-European

Indo-European  

Of or relating to the family of languages spoken over the greater part of Europe and Asia as far as northern India.The Indo-European languages have a history of over 3,000 years. Their unattested, ...
baths

baths  

[Co]A feature of all Roman towns and cities as well as private houses throughout the empire. From the 1st century bc onwards, the tradition of bathing became a major social institution. See thermae.
tree

tree  

A large, perennial, woody plant that usually has one main trunk, a number of branches, and a crown of foliage.
possession

possession  

A very common phenomenon in popular and village Hinduism, involving the apparent ‘possession’ of a (usually lower-caste) individual by another entity, the presence of which is made evident through ...
debt

debt  

Debt of honour a debt that is not legally recoverable, especially a sum lost in gambling.See also death pays all debts, national debt, out of debt, out of danger.
orientalism

orientalism  

Architecture and design drawing on Islamic, Chinese, Japanese, Ottoman and the Eastern styles, such as Chinoiserie or the Hindoo style.Conner (1979);Crinson (1996);Honour (1961);Impey (1977)
basilica

basilica  

A large oblong hall or building with double colonnades and a semicircular apse, used in ancient Rome as a law court or for public assemblies. The name was then applied to a building of this type used ...
cave

cave  

A large, natural, underground hollow, usually with a horizontal opening. Karst caves result from solution and corrosion; see Miller (2006) GSA Special Paper 404.
king's evil

king's evil  

Syn: scrofula, lymphadenopathic tuberculosis. A very rare condition today but one that was common in medieval Europe; it caused disfiguring red swelling over the affected glands and was popularly ...
Rabindranath Tagore

Rabindranath Tagore  

(1861–1941)Indian writer, who was awarded the 1913 Nobel Prize for Literature. In 1915 he was knighted but repudiated the honour in protest against the Amritsar Massacre (1919).Tagore was born into a ...
food

food  

Any material containing nutrients, such as carbohydrates, proteins and fats, which are required by living organisms in order to obtain energy for growth and maintenance. Heterotrophic organisms, such ...
Mary Wollstonecraft

Mary Wollstonecraft  

(1759–97)British writer and feminist, of Irish descent. She was associated with a radical circle known as the ‘English Jacobins’, whose members included Thomas Paine and William Godwin. In 1790 she ...
snakes

snakes  

Proverbial allusions to the snake focus on its venomous bite as representing a lurking danger; it is a type of deceit and treachery, as with reference to the fable by Aesop, in which the man who had ...
Edmund Burke

Edmund Burke  

(1729–97).British statesman and writer. His A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (1756) was of enormous importance in creating a move from Classicism to ...
John Maynard Keynes

John Maynard Keynes  

(1883–1946)English economist and philosopher. Although primarily known as an economist, Keynes produced one philosophical classic, the Treatise on Probability (1921). This develops the theory of ...
Lewis Mumford

Lewis Mumford  

(1895–1990).American architectural and town-planning critic. A disciple of Patrick Geddes, his views on urban planning originally stemmed from that source. His Story of Utopias (1922) was followed by ...
marriage

marriage  

Marriage is a lottery proverbial saying, mid 17th century, referring either to one's choice of partner, or more generally to the element of chance involved in how a marriage will turn out.Marriage of ...
ethnicity

ethnicity  

A term for the ethnic group to which people belong. Usually it refers to group identity based on culture, religion, traditions, and customs. In some contexts, it is a “politically correct” term ...

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