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Overview

John Lennon

Subject: Music

B. John Winston Lennon, 9 October 1940, Liverpool, Lancashire, England, d. 8 December 1980, New York City, New York, USA. John Winston Ono Lennon has been exhumed in print more ...

proprietary

proprietary   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...: “The contracts were negotiated not with the band's company, The Beatles, Ltd., which held the rights, but with NEMS, which did not possess any proprietorial [read proprietary ] rights whatsoever, being simply a management organization.” Albert Goldman , The Lives of John Lennon 335 ( 1988 ). Language-Change Index proprietorial misused for proprietary : Stage...

than

than   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
1,193 words

...in the first as well as the second. The first means more than ( she likes ) me , the second more than I ( like the dog ). The Beatles presented this dilemma in their song “If I Fell” ( 1964 ), in which John Lennon sang: “I must be sure, from the very start, that you would love me more than her.” Either this is bad English, or Lennon was envisioning a bisexual lover contemplating same-sex and different-sex lovers. But the latter has never seemed plausible—and the objective case is probably the speaker's maladroit attempt to suggest that two women...

guy

guy   Quick reference

Fowler’s Concise Dictionary of Modern English Usage (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
140 words

...Britain and other parts of the English-speaking world, especially Australia and New Zealand. Examples: You guys all belong in the same ballpark — Observer , 1970 I’m just as romantic as the next guy, and always was — John Lennon , 1980 She was a regular guy, a good sport and a fine actress —quoted in American Speech , 1983 I could see John by the bar talking to some guys — New Yorker , 1989...

ingratiate

ingratiate   Quick reference

Fowler’s Concise Dictionary of Modern English Usage (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
150 words

...myself by asking who was her favourite composer — M. Dibdin , 1991 . The non-reflexive use is not standard: ☒ He was going to pretend that his limp was cured, and that would ingratiate him with Matta, help him set his trap — R. Campbell , 1993 ☒ Her first records with John Lennon didn’t exactly ingratiate her to Beatle fans with their feedback-drenched, primal scream freak-outs —music reviews website, AmE 2004 [ OEC ]. (Better alternatives in these examples would be commend him to and endear her to .) Ingratiate occurs frequently in the...

ingratiate

ingratiate   Reference library

Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
196 words

...of the word have only a very approximate idea of what it means.) Often, as in the first example below, the transitive construction stands for ‘endear to’. Ingratiate is also often used absolutely, i.e. without an object, as in the second example. ?Her first records with John Lennon didn’t exactly ingratiate her to Beatle fans with their feedback-drenched, primal scream freak-outs —music reviews website, 2004 ; ‘Good’ behaviour designed to placate and to ingratiate —A. Storr, 1972...

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