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Overview

Johann Gutenberg

Subject: Literature

(c.1396–1468), inventor of printing. He was a native of Mainz. In 1448 he borrowed money, probably for developing his printing process. He printed the Mazarin Bible (q.v.) and ...

Technology

Technology   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Global Change

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...numerals. 1453 Johann Gutenberg introduces movable type in printing. 1504 Amerigo Vespucci recognizes New World is not Asia. 1510 Leonardo da Vinci proposes water-driven turbine and many other science concepts. 1521 Ferdinand Magellan's circumnavigation confirms Earth's size. 1543 Nicolas Copernicus publishes De Revolutionibus , heliocentric theory. 1568 Gerhart Mercator's map projection for sailors and explorers. 1600 William Gilbert explains Earth's magnetism. 1608 Galileo improves telescope, advances ideas on gravity and motion. 1609 Johann Kepler...

Belief Systems

Belief Systems   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Global Change

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...and competitiveness. It can hardly be immaterial to this rebirth that Erasmus was in these years overseeing the publication of the works of Aristotle and other Greek authors. For the first time, these books were set in the movable type developed a few decades earlier (the Gutenberg Bible dates from 1456 ). Whatever its ultimate causes, the pride of the new age was evident in Michelangelo, both in his defiant David ( 1504 ) or in his sternly judicial Moses ( 1515 ). In literature, Shakespeare puts it best, in Hamlet ( 1600 ). In a gloomy humor,...

seismology

seismology   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the History of Modern Science

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Subject:
Science and technology, History of Science
Length:
1,101 words

...maps of global seismicity. Using Milne's seismograph scientists in the British empire had set up the first uniform, international network. In the 1930s Charles Francis Richter and Beno Gutenberg developed a standard scale to measure the relative sizes of earthquake sources, commonly called the Richter scale. It is one of several magnitude scales in use today. Gutenberg and Richter also wrote textbooks that became standards in the field. Seismology figured among the founding six sections at the first meeting of the International Union of Geodesy and...

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