You are looking at 1-9 of 9 entries  for:

  • All: Islamic fundamentalism x
clear all

View:

Overview

Islamic fundamentalism

A disputed term, widely used in the US and to a lesser extent in Britain to denote any movement to favour strict observance of the teachings of the Qur'an and the Shari'a (Islamic Law). On ...

South Asian Law

South Asian Law   Reference library

The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, History
Length:
8,610 words
Illustration(s):
2

...Hindu fundamentalism, Islamic law in India occupies a firmly secured place. After independence in 1947 India reformed the majority Hindu personal law, but retained the Muslim Personal Law (Shariat) Application Act of 1937 , so that Indian Muslims remain in effect governed by uncodified shariʿa law, mainly in family law. Though Article 44 of the Indian Constitution ( 1950 ) recommended a uniform civil code, this is now acknowledged as impracticable idealism; postmodern Indian law has developed a harmonized personal-law system, partly based on Islamic...

Afghanistan, Islamic Law in

Afghanistan, Islamic Law in   Reference library

The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, History
Length:
3,861 words
Illustration(s):
1

...[ See also Islamic Schools of Sacred Law: Sunni Schools, subentry on The Hanafi School of Law .] Bibliography The dramatic events that marked the rise and fall of Communism and of Taliban rule, and the forced ouster of the Taliban by the U.S. military, destabilized Afghanistan and brought it into the limelight of world media and, to some extent, also of scholarly attention. Yet the books from before and after that period tend to be generic, treating selected issues of political and military concern, religious fundamentalism, and the mujahidin...

Censorship

Censorship   Reference library

The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, History
Length:
4,664 words

...connected with rigorist fundamentalism, but without a connection to the traditional muḥtasib . In Saudi Arabia, the institution is called mutaṭawwiʿ . In Pakistan, the muḥtasib has been transformed into an ombudsman. The well-known “apostasy case” of the Egyptian ʿAbu Zayd was promoted by a “ ḥisba demand.” It seems evident, however, that the present insistence on “commanding right and forbidding wrong” has not given rise to any Islamic rebirth of specialized market control. [ See also Ibn Hazm, ʿAli ibn Ahmad ibn Saʿid ; Islamic Schools of Sacred Law:...

Pakistan

Pakistan   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Human Rights

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, Human Rights and Immigration, Social sciences
Length:
8,140 words

...on “enlightened moderation” received wide acclaim, just as Zia's Islamization policies had attracted support, mainly because Pakistan was in a position to help confront the Soviet Union in Afghanistan. Ironically, during the 1980s jihad (holy war fought in the name of Islam) was viewed as a sublime struggle against “the evil empire,” while a decade later some of the same jihadis and their external backers engaged in open confrontation that Tariq Ali called “the clash of fundamentalisms.” Ordinary people and civic activists were the main casualties of the...

Egypt from Nasser to the Present

Egypt from Nasser to the Present   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Human Rights

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, Human Rights and Immigration, Social sciences
Length:
6,734 words

...its power through loyal followers, who turned out to be more entrenched than those of his predecessor. Sadat needed strong support, including new allies, in his continued confrontations with Nasserists, so he took up the arguments and ideas of Islamist propaganda, using Islamic fundamentalism to achieve political ends. Some Muslim Brotherhood's supporters still in jail were set free, and the organization itself was allowed a degree of newfound freedom. It remained an illegal organization, but its militants were permitted to openly propagandize and publish the...

Sisterhood Is Global

Sisterhood Is Global   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Human Rights

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, Human Rights and Immigration, Social sciences
Length:
3,108 words

...conditions (labor standards, income, and employment status). Another important development at the level of states, regions, and the world system that led to the narrowing of the political and ideological divide between first world and third world feminists was the rise of Islamic fundamentalism in Muslim countries and Hindu communalism in India. These movements sought to restore traditional norms and codes, including patriarchal laws and family roles for women; they put pressure on states to enforce public morality, increase religious observance, and tighten...

Index on Censorship

Index on Censorship   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Human Rights

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, Human Rights and Immigration, Social sciences
Length:
2,309 words

...are published quarterly in the United Kingdom. The magazine underwent a dramatic editorial redesign with the appointment of Ursula Owen as chief executive in 1993 . The focus of the magazine broadened to include contemporary debates on issues such as immigration, religious fundamentalism, the death penalty, and the condition of the world's children. Since 2007 the magazine has featured two major topics per issue. Regular features in most print editions include news stories about contemporary expression or censorship issues, editorial commentary, interviews...

Chechnya

Chechnya   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Human Rights

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, Human Rights and Immigration, Social sciences
Length:
7,190 words

...Caucasian languages, is indigenous to the area and unrelated to any major linguistic group. Chechens are predominantly Sunni Sufis of the Hanafi school, having converted to Islam between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries. However, during the course of the brutal Russo-Chechen wars beginning in 1994 and 1999 , respectively, there has been a rise in Wahhabism, Islamic fundamentalism, and violent extremism, as well as a breakdown of the social order previously held together by the patriarchal Chechen clan system. Chechnya is a partly mountainous republic...

Art and Images

Art and Images   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Human Rights

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, Human Rights and Immigration, Social sciences
Length:
7,916 words

...of the world. However, the chairs could not be used, pointing to the difficulties of cross-cultural understanding. Witnessing has been a critical aspect of art in our times outside Europe and North America. In India, Vivan Sundaram has worked in his art to combat religious fundamentalism. In Pakistan, Salima Hashmi has produced quiet and beautiful works, such as her semiabstract painting People Wept at Dawn , which acts as a memorial to suffering for those who protest human rights abuses. Artists in Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka have produced...

View: