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Gustaf Kossinna

Subject: Archaeology

(1858–1931) [Bi] German linguist and prehistorian well known for his nationalistic views on the use of archaeological research. Born in Tilsit, East Prussia, he attended the ...

Kossinna, Gustaf

Kossinna, Gustaf   Reference library

Ulrich Veit

The Oxford Companion To Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Archaeology
Length:
719 words

...318–334, 2008. Grünert, Heinz . Gustaf Kossinna (1858-1931): vom Germanisten zum Prähistoriker: ein Wissenschaftler im Kaiserreich und in der Weimarer Republik , 2002. Härke, Heinrich , ed. Archaeology, Ideology and Society: The German Experience. Gesellschaften und Staaten im Epochenwandel 7, 2000. Krosigk, Hildegard Schwerin von. Gustaf Kossinna: Der Nachlass-Versuch einer Analyse , 1982. Smolla, Günter . “Das Kossinna-Sydrom.” Fundberichte aus Hessen 19/20 (1979–1980): 1–9. Smolla, Günter . “Gustaf Kossinna nach 50 Jahren.” Acta...

Kossinna, Gustaf

Kossinna, Gustaf   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
149 words

..., Gustaf ( 1858–1931 ) [Bi] German linguist and prehistorian well known for his nationalistic views on the use of archaeological research. Born in Tilsit, East Prussia, he attended the universities of Göttingen, Leipzig, Berlin, and Strasbourg. He then became a librarian and worked in the library of the University of Berlin from 1892 . During this time he read widely on archaeology and published numerous papers on material culture in relation to German territory. Rather strangely, in 1904 , he was appointed Professor of German Prehistory in the...

History of Archaeology

History of Archaeology   Reference library

Margarita Díaz-Andreu

The Oxford Companion To Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Archaeology
Length:
524 words

...of archaeology is exceedingly long, and the names of Aurel Stein , Gustaf Kossinna , Lewis Binford , Colin Renfrew , and Ian Hodder are only a few of those who would always mentioned in Anglo-speaking histories of archaeology. [ See also Antiquarianism ; Battlefield Archaeology ; Classical Archaeology ; Colonialism ; Historical Archaeology ; History of Archaeological Institutions ; Hodder, Ian ; Human Evolution, Theories of ; Imperialism ; Kossinna, Gustaf ; Medieval Archaeology ; Museums ; Nationalism ; Political and Ideological...

Germany

Germany   Reference library

Ulrich Veit

The Oxford Companion To Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Archaeology
Length:
3,435 words

...for Gustaf Kossinna, who in 1902 became the first professor of German archaeology at Berlin University. But Kossinna, who was educated as a philologist, started from what he thought to be secure historical knowledge: the distribution of the ancient peoples of Europe in early historical times. His research was especially focused on the Germanic tribes, whose early history for Kossinna and others extended far into prehistoric times. He claimed that he had developed a method that enabled him to reconstruct this history only by archaeological means. And—Kossinna had...

Diffusion

Diffusion   Reference library

D. Bruce Dickson and Ulrich Veit

The Oxford Companion To Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Archaeology
Length:
2,034 words

...when he published it the culture historical school in anthropology was still in decline. In prehistoric archaeology a similar culture historical approach had been founded at the turn of the twentieth century by the German Prehistorian Gustaf Kossinna ( 1858–1931 ), but with a much narrower geographical focus. Kossinna was mainly interested in the “Germani” and adjacent peoples and therefore concentrated his research on central and northern Europe. Nevertheless, his approach to delineating prehistoric culture areas during the following decades exercised a...

Racism

Racism   Reference library

D. Ryan Gray

The Oxford Companion To Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Archaeology
Length:
1,126 words

...in material remains, were interpreted as representing distinct ethnic and racial groups in the present, often for explicitly nationalistic purposes. This tendency is best (and most notoriously) illustrated through the work of the early-twentieth-century German archaeologist Gustaf Kossinna, who claimed that Germanic peoples, as the true descendents of the Aryan race, had been responsible for a far-ranging civilizing process, bringing culture to the world through their migrations from a German homeland to Greece and the Near East. Race and Racism in Contemporary...

Ethnic Interpretation

Ethnic Interpretation   Reference library

Philip Duke

The Oxford Companion To Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Archaeology
Length:
1,933 words

...on the same archaeological record, depending on whether a particular museum is state- or locally oriented. [ See also Ancient Pueblo Culture ; Binford, Lewis ; Childe, V. Gordon ; Culture Historical Theory ; Cuzco ; Darwinian Theory ; Ethnoarchaeology ; Germany ; Kossinna, Gustaf ; Political Uses of Archaeology ; Processual Theory ; Trigger, Bruce . ] Ben-Yehuda , Nachman . Sacrificing Truth: Archaeology and the Myth of Masada , 2002. Childe, V. Gordon . The Danube in Prehistory , 1929. Isajiw, W. W. “Definitions of Ethnicity.” Ethnicity ...

Speech and Language

Speech and Language   Reference library

Steven Mithen

The Oxford Companion To Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Archaeology
Length:
2,659 words

...to contribute to this field by using the distribution of archaeological cultures to propose patterns of migrations and invasions by ethnic groups, who were assumed to have their own language. Hitler and the National Socialists exploited work of this kind, such as that of Gustaf Kossinna, to legitimize their own political agenda. Not surprisingly, in the postwar years archaeologists shied away from the study of language dispersal. This neglect was exacerbated by the decreased concern with migration and invasion as explanations in archaeology that occurred...

Germani and Germanic Migrations

Germani and Germanic Migrations   Reference library

Guy Halsall

The Oxford Companion To Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Archaeology
Length:
2,270 words

...and twentieth centuries these ideas took a significant turn when German scholars used concepts of language and of the relationships between archaeological cultures and peoples or even nations to claim a historical dominance for Germanic peoples, culture, and civilization. Gustaf Kossinna ( 1858–1931 ) is the man most famously associated with this movement. The Nazis adopted these ideas with gusto but they did not invent them. Nor have post-Nazi archaeologists entirely abandoned some of their foundational notions. The idea of a really existing Germanic...

Nationalism

Nationalism   Reference library

Carsten Paludan-Müller and Margarita Díaz-Andreu

The Oxford Companion To Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Archaeology
Length:
2,667 words

...internationally recognized borders. In Italy, the fascists “edited” and made use of the Roman imperial past in their project to modernize Italy and to resurrect it to a new imperial status modeled upon Rome’s Mediterranean empire. In Germany, the work of the archaeologist Gustaf Kossinna went hand in hand with the geopolitical understanding of the need for Germany to expand into a wider “Lebensraum” that could be demonstrated by archaeology to be historically German and, according to that logic, a natural claim. The end of World War II brought about a geopolitical...

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