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Grigori Zinoviev

(b. 11 Sept. 1883, d. 25 Aug. 1936). Soviet politician Born Radomyslsky Apfelbaum in Elizavetgrad, he joined the Russian Social Democratic Party in 1901 and supported the ...

Zinoviev, Grigori Evseyevich

Zinoviev, Grigori Evseyevich (1883–1936)   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
115 words

..., Grigori Evseyevich ( 1883–1936 ) Russian revolutionary . A self-educated lawyer, Zinoviev joined the Bolsheviks in 1903 , and was active in the Russian Revolution of 1905 . He was a close collaborator of Lenin in exile ( 1908–17 ). In the Russian Revolution ( 1917 ), Zinoviev voted against seizing power but remained a powerful figure in St Petersburg and was appointed head of the Communist International in 1919 . Although he sided with Stalin against Trotsky in 1922 , Zinoviev was later expelled from the party and eventually...

Zinoviev, Grigori Yevseyevich

Zinoviev, Grigori Yevseyevich (1883–1936)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History
Length:
110 words

..., Grigori Yevseyevich ( 1883–1936 ) Soviet communist leader . Despite originally opposing the Russian Revolution , he became chairman of the Comintern (1919–26). In 1924 a letter apparently signed by him (known as the Zinoviev letter ) was sent to the British Communist Party, urging revolutionary activity within the army and in Ireland. Published in British Conservative newspapers four days before the general election, it may have swung the middle-class vote away from the Labour Party, who claimed (correctly) that it was a forgery. On ...

Zinoviev, Grigori Yevseevich

Zinoviev, Grigori Yevseevich (1883–1936)   Quick reference

Who's Who in the Twentieth Century

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History
Length:
289 words

..., Grigori Yevseevich ( 1883–1936 ) Russian revolutionary and chairman of Comintern ( 1919–26 ). Born in Yelisavetgrad (now Kirovograd) into a middle-class family, Zinoviev joined the Russian Social Democratic Workers Party in 1901 . He aligned himself with the Bolsheviks in 1903 and took part in the unsuccessful 1905 revolution, becoming closely associated with Lenin in the years that followed. Zinoviev played a significant part in the October Revolution ( 1917 ), and as one of the principal Bolshevik leaders he was put in charge of the...

Zinoviev letter

Zinoviev letter   Reference library

Bernard Porter

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
109 words

... letter . Supposed to have brought down the first Labour government of 1924 . It bore the signature of Grigori Zinoviev, president of the Communist International (Comintern) in Moscow, and was addressed to the Communist Party of Great Britain , calling on it to sow subversion among the armed forces of the crown. There is a faint possibility that it was a forgery; and a stronger likelihood that it was deliberately ‘leaked’ by the British secret services , who intercepted it, shortly before the October 1924 general election, in order to scare voters...

Zinoviev letter

Zinoviev letter   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

... letter a letter published in the press in 1924 as having been sent by the Soviet politician Grigori Zinoviev ( 1883–1936 ) to British Communists, inciting them to subversion; it was later discovered to be a...

Zinoviev letter

Zinoviev letter   Quick reference

A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
90 words

... letter Supposed to have brought down the first Labour government of 1924 . It bore the signature of Grigori Zinoviev , president of the Communist International (Comintern) in Moscow, and was addressed to the Communist Party of Great Britain , calling on it to sow subversion among the armed forces of the crown. There is a faint possibility that it was a forgery; and a stronger likelihood that it was deliberately ‘leaked’ by the British secret services, shortly before the October 1924 general election, to scare voters over to the...

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