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Demetrius (20)

Of Troezen (probably 1st cent. ad), wrote works on literary history. The only known title is that of his work on philosophers, Against the Sophists. Athenaeus 1. 29a;Diogenes ...

Origen

Origen (c.185–c.254)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
403 words

...writer . Born in Egypt, he was brought up as a Christian and recognized by Demetrius , Bp. of Alexandria , as head of the Catechetical School (q.v.). When trouble broke out in Alexandria in 215, he went to Palestine; his preaching here as a layman was regarded as a breach of Alexandrian ecclesiastical discipline and he was recalled. In 230 he went to Palestine again and was ordained priest by the bishops who had invited him to preach on his previous visit. In consequence Demetrius deprived him of his chair and deposed him from the priesthood. Origen went to...

Maccabees, The

Maccabees, The   Reference library

The Oxford Guide to People and Places of the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Religion
Length:
1,549 words

...Balas gave him the high priesthood (to which Jonathan had no hereditary right) in 152 bce . Jonathan refused to support Demetrius I and defeated Demetrius II in 147 bce (thus earning new honors and more territory from Balas); but when Balas was killed in 145 bce , Jonathan shifted his allegiance to Demetrius II, for which Demetrius transferred to Jonathan three districts from Samaria . When Antiochus VI and Trypho ousted Demetrius in 145 bce , they confirmed Jonathan in his position and made his brother Simon governor of the coastal region. Jonathan...

Ephesus

Ephesus   Quick reference

A Dictionary of the Bible (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Religion
Length:
299 words

...in the theatre when * Demetrius , convener of the silversmiths' union, urged that the propagation of Paul's * monotheism was putting in jeopardy their lucrative trade in statues of the great goddess. On this occasion the * asiarchs (appointed to promote emperor worship) were minded to sympathize with Paul for breaking the Artemis monopoly (Acts 19: 31). Nevertheless, Paul discreetly said farewell and sailed for Greece, leaving behind an established Church— * Aquila and Priscilla among the members—with * elders (Acts 20: 17). The Church was destined...

1 Maccabees

1 Maccabees   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
9,140 words
Illustration(s):
2

...(pretender to Seleucid throne) and Demetrius I compete for Jonathan's support; Alexander defeats Demetrius 10:51–66 Alexander allies with Ptolemy, and honors Jonathan 10:67–89 Demetrius II arrives; Jonathan defeats his army 11:1–19 Ptolemy and Alexander die after battle; Demetrius II supreme 11:20–53 Jonathan supports Demetrius II (Trypho emerges, 38-40) 11:54–59 Trypho and Antiochus VI bid for Jonathan and Simon's support 11:60–74 Jonathan takes control of Askalon, Gaza; Simon takes Beth-zur; Jonathan defeats Demetrius's army near Hazor 12:1–23 Jonathan...

Pesharim

Pesharim   Reference library

James Hamilton Charlesworth and Henry W. Morisada Rietz

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
3,494 words
Illustration(s):
1

...Collection, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress 75 and 1 b.c.e. This pesher is particularly interesting because it explicitly mentions two historical personages, “[Deme]trius” (frgs. 3–4 1.2), who is probably to be identified as Demetrius III Eukerus ( 95–88 b.c.e. ), and “Antiochus” (frgs. 3–4 1.3). The pesher interprets Nahum as predicting that Demetrius helped the Pharisaic uprising against Alexander Janneus (frgs. 3–4 1.1–3) and even Alexander Janneus's reprisal against the Pharisees (frgs. 3–4 1.6–10). Alexander Janneus, called the...

Irony and Humor

Irony and Humor   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Religion
Length:
747 words

...; 18.5 ) and Jesus’ feigned ignorance ( Luke 24.19 ). The book of Acts is a kind of story in which the humor often consists in amusing situations. There is something comical about Peter 's return to the congregation ( 12.1–19 ), missionaries as gods ( 14.1–18 ), and Demetrius 's wonderful speech in Ephesus ( 19.23–41 ). Paul had rabbinical training and uses ironical questions about theological matters ( Rom. 3.29 ; 6.1 , 15 ; 7.7 , 13 ). He describes himself as a fool for Christ's sake ( 1 Cor. 4.9–10 ), and even speaks of God as foolish and...

Maccabees, The Books of the

Maccabees, The Books of the   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Religion
Length:
6,350 words

... gave him the high priesthood (to which Jonathan had no hereditary right) in 152 BCE . Jonathan refused to support Demetrius I and defeated Demetrius II in 147 BCE (thus earning new honors and more territory from Balas); but when Balas was killed in 145 BCE , Jonathan shifted his allegiance to Demetrius II, for which Demetrius transferred to Jonathan three districts from Samaria . When Antiochus VI and Trypho ousted Demetrius in 145 BCE , they confirmed Jonathan in his position and made his brother Simon governor of the coastal region....

2 Maccabees

2 Maccabees   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
7,753 words

...events of the letters and the historical section are mainly situated in Judea during the Seleucid Empire. Four Seleucid Kings are mentioned in the book: Seleucus IV ( 187–175 b.c.e. ), Antiochus IV ( 175–164 b.c.e. ), Antiochus V ( 164–162 b.c.e. ) and Demetrius I ( 162–150 b.c.e. ; 2 Macc 1:14–5 ; 2:20 ; 3:3 ; 4:7 ; 10:10 ; 14:1 ). Antiochus IV Epiphanes is highlighted as the wicked king who tried to abolish the Jewish religion and annihilate the Jewish people. This context overlaps to a great extent that of 1 Maccabees, but 2 Maccabees focuses much...

1, 2, and 3 John

1, 2, and 3 John   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
3,935 words

...message, and advising them how to behave when threatened by schismatic missionaries. Third John is a personal letter to Gauis criticizing Diotrephes for refusing to receive missionaries, but praising those who walk in truth and are willing to receive them, and recommending Demetrius. Historical Context. All three letters were written within situations of conflict where opponents threaten the identity and basic values of the recipients and their communities. While a definite description of these opponents is lacking in the letters, we do find some direct...

Letters

Letters   Reference library

James M. Lindenberger

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
6,837 words
Illustration(s):
3

...in the Greco-Roman world there were handbooks of epistolography and anthologies of literary letters. A certain Demetrius (not the famous Demetrius of Phaleron), in his work “On Style” (of uncertain date, possibly first century c.e. , incorporating older material), includes an excursus on letter-writing style, urging the use of a “plain” style, “a little more formal than the dialogue.” Another writer, conventionally known as Pseudo-Demetrius (second century b.c.e. to third century c.e. ), wrote a treatise on “Epistolary Types” in which he lists...

Nahum

Nahum   Reference library

John R. Huddlestun

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
7,304 words

...are referred to in indirect fashion via epithets in the scrolls (Pharisees, Sadducees, Maccabean rulers, etc.), the Nahum pesher is rare for its explicit mention (Frags. 3–4, Col. I, line 2 on Nah 2:11 ) of two historical figures (“[Deme]trius king of Greece,” identified by most scholars as the Seleucid king Demetrius III Eukairos, reigned 95–88 b.c.e. ) and “Antiochus” (the Ptolemaic ruler, either Antiochus III [223–187] or IV [175–164]; Berrin, pp. 89–91, 100; Oxford Encyclopedia , vol.1, p. 189). As such, the commentary provides valuable...

Dead Sea Scrolls

Dead Sea Scrolls   Reference library

Ken M. Penner

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
12,815 words
Illustration(s):
4

...of these commentaries are those on Psalm 37, Nahum, and Habakkuk. In the commentary on Psalm 37, a priest is identified as the “Teacher of Righteousness” and is opposed to a figure called the “Wicked Priest.” In 4QpNah, the Romans are called “Kittim,” and the historical figures Demetrius and Antiochus are named. A character called the “Angry Lion” is said to hang “seekers of smooth things” on a tree, and is commonly thought to refer to Alexander Janneus , who crucified Pharisees. In 1QpHab, the Chaldeans are interpreted as the Romans (Kittim), and here too...

Rhetorical Criticism

Rhetorical Criticism   Reference library

David A. deSilva

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Biblical Interpretation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
7,063 words

...suitability of classical rhetorical theory to written compositions. Some scholars would prefer to see analysis of Paul’s letters, for example, draw not upon ancient rhetorical handbooks, but rather upon the epistolary handbooks of late antiquity (for example, those of Pseudo–Demetrius and Pseudo–Libanius from the third century ce or later). These handbooks provide catalogs of letter “types,” brief statements of the goals that might lead a writer to choose the style of one type over others, and brief models of letters of each type. These cursory handbooks...

Translation Techniques

Translation Techniques   Reference library

Leonard Greenspoon and Christina Petterson

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Biblical Interpretation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
11,869 words

...devotes only about 15 percent of its 322 verses to this topic. The Letter purports to be a contemporary account from the reign of Ptolemy II (Philadelphus), who ruled from 285–247 b.c.e . As related by Aristeas, the impetus for the translation came from the royal librarian Demetrius, who wished to add “the lawbooks of the Jews” in Greek to a collection numbering over 200,000 volumes ( Shutt 1985 pp. 9–11). Ptolemy agreed and sent a letter to Eleazar, high priest in Jerusalem, requesting 72 elders (six from each tribe) “of exemplary lives, with the experience...

Gospels

Gospels   Reference library

John S. Kloppenborg

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
10,442 words
Illustration(s):
2

...4.3.14) and in the same century Aristophanes used the cognate verb euaggelizesthai to mean “to bring good news” ( Knights 643, 647, 656; Wealth 765). In the Hellenistic period euaggelion is particularly connected with the news of military victories (e.g., Plutarch, Demetrius 17.5–6). The Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible (LXX) employed the nouns euaggelion (neuter) and euaggelia (feminine) only twice, while the cognate verbs euaggelizein and euaggelizesthai appear more frequently. These terms render the noun bĕśōrâ , “message” and the...

Translations

Translations   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Religion
Length:
21,966 words

...) was translated by a monk from Gallipoli, edited by Cyril Lucar , Patriarch of Constantinople, and published at the expense of the Dutch States General. It has often been revised and reprinted: by Seraphim of Mitylene (London, 1703 ), Anastasius Michael (Halle, 1710 ), Demetrius Schinas ( 1827 ), and others. The Bible translated by N. Bambas (London, 1840 Old Testament, 1844 New Testament) has become the standard Protestant Modern Greek Bible. A vernacular version of the Gospels by Alexander Pallis from the fourth century Codex Vaticanus...

Levni

Levni (d.1732)   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
632 words

...and was the last great illustrator of manuscripts in the Islamic world ( see Illustration , §VI, D, 2 ). His works reflect the last flowering of the genre of historical painting, while avoiding European features adopted by his contemporaries. Levni is first mentioned by Demetrius Cantemir , prince of Moldavia, as the sultan's portraitist ( musavvir ) responsible for the portraits that Cantemir copied in his book, The History of the Growth and Decay of the Ottoman Empire ( 1734–5 ). According to the Ottoman biographer Ayvansaraylı ( d. 1787 ), Levni...

Byzantine World

Byzantine World   Reference library

Barbara Crostini

The Oxford Guide to the Historical Reception of Augustine

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
7,264 words

... and Writings of Demetrius Kydones. A Study of Byzantine Politics and Society , c.1347–c.1373 (D.Phil. thesis, Oxford University 2006). L. I. Hamilton , ‘Possidius’ Augustine and Post-Augustinian Africa’, Journal of Early Christian Studies 12 (2004) 85–105. R. Haugh , Photius and the Carolingians. The Trinitarian Controversy (Belmont 1975). M. Jugie , ‘Démétrius Cydonès et théologie...

Tel Kedesh

Tel Kedesh   Reference library

Andrea M. Berlin and Sharon C. Herbert

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Archaeology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Archaeology, Religion
Length:
5,536 words
Illustration(s):
4

...the Persian–Hellenistic Administrative Building, served under three successive foreign dynasties: the Achaemenid Persians, the Ptolemies, and the Seleucids. The building was abandoned after a nearby battle in 144/43 b.c.e. between the Hasmonean Jonathan and the Seleucid Demetrius II. It was partially reoccupied during the last third of the second century b.c.e. by people whose origins and affiliations are uncertain but whose lifestyle was different and poorer than that of the previous occupants. While the Administrative Building’s footprint remained...

Education

Education   Reference library

Friedrich V. Reiterer

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Ethics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Religion, Philosophy
Length:
3,615 words

...mentioned in the Esther ( 3:1–14 ; 8:7–13 ). The Seleucid kings Demetrius I ( 162–150 b.c.e. ) and Alexander Balas ( 150–145 b.c.e. ) were in correspondence with Jonathan ( 1 Macc 10:3 , 7 , 18–20 , 26–45 ). On “bronze tablets” ( 1 Macc 8:22 ) was the “copy of the letter…(of the) memorial of peace and alliance” between the Roman senate and the nation of the Jews under Judas Maccabeus. We read the diplomatic correspondence between the Jews and the Spartans in 1 Maccabees 12:6–15 , 20–23 . Data of theological and religious character. God has a book,...

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