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Cold War

Subject: History

The antagonism between the USA and USSR lasting from the late 1940s until the late 1980s, ‘cold’ because it was waged through diplomatic and ideological means rather than force. Britain ...

Henry V

Henry V   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,163 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...approach (such as Alan Howard in Terry Hands ’s important Stratford production of 1975 ), some reacting strongly against it (such as Michael Pennington , playing Henry as a cold cynic in Michael Bogdanov ’s production of 1985–6 ), and some attempting to do both, notably Kenneth Branagh , who first played the role in Adrian Noble ’s ambivalently post-Falklands War production for the RSC in 1984 . Michael Dobson On the screen: The two outstanding Henry V films were made by Laurence Olivier ( 1944 ) and Kenneth Branagh ( 1989 ) who, like Olivier...

Henry IV Part 1

Henry IV Part 1   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,574 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...RSC in 1964 , with Ian Holm as Harry, part of an ambitious presentation of the Second Tetralogy which staged it as a prelude to the First, famously condensed into the three-part The Wars of the Roses . This immense undertaking was repeated, in a very different manner, by Michael Bogdanov ’s English Shakespeare Company in 1985–6 , with Michael Pennington as a cold Harry and John Woodvine as a memorably cynical Sir John. Other notable Hal-Falstaff pairings in more recent times include William Houston and Desmond Barrit (RSC, 2000 ); Matthew...

Venus and Adonis

Venus and Adonis   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Will Sharpe

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
1,978 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...She pulls him down on top of her, but to no avail (ll. 541–612). Venus warns Adonis against the perils of boar-hunting, urging him instead to hunt only hares, foxes, or deer (ll. 613–713). Venus renews her pleading for love, explaining that the night is dark to reproach Adonis’ coldness and encourage prodigality (ll. 715–68). Adonis refuses Venus, accusing her of miscalling lust by the name of love, and at last makes his escape (ll. 769–816). Alone, Venus wanders lost in the dark: noticing how her moans echo, she spends the night extemporizing an echoing song...

Henry IV Part 2

Henry IV Part 2   Reference library

Michael Dobson

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,727 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...in terror: Sir John hands him over to Prince John, who arrives with Westmorland and soldiers pursuing fleeing rebels, and Coleville is sent to York to be executed. The nobles set off for London, where the King’s sickness has worsened. Sir John reflects that Prince John’s cold nature is the result of insufficient drinking, a fault from which Harry is free, and speaks eloquently of the beneficial effects of consuming sherry-sack. 4.3 On his sickbed, the King speaks of Prince Harry and his anxiety about the chaos that may befall his kingdom when he...

Antony and Cleopatra

Antony and Cleopatra   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,330 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...unprecedentedly free in versification—defies its onstage drama, with key events (including most of Antony and Cleopatra’s time together, and the decisive battle of Actium) evoked in language rather than shown on stage. The lovers’ glamorous past seems as significant as the coldly rational present (personified by the efficient Octavius Caesar) in which they are being defeated: during the last act Cleopatra’s poetic invocation of a heroic Antony seeks to upstage and eclipse the flawed failure whom the action of the play has in fact shown. In so far as she...

All’s Well That Ends Well

All’s Well That Ends Well   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,814 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...status. Returning from his enforced wedding, Bertram tells Paroles he means to send Helen back to Roussillon without consummating the marriage and run away to the wars. 2.4 Paroles tells a grieved but compliant Helen that Bertram must depart at once on unspecified business and wishes her to return home. 2.5 Lafeu warns Bertram, in vain, against placing any faith in Paroles. Bertram takes a cold farewell from Helen, before he and Paroles leave for Italy. 3.1 The Lords Dumaine are welcomed to the battlefront by the Duke of Florence. 3.2 The Countess, delighted...

Othello

Othello   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, Anthony Davies, and Will Sharpe

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
4,092 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...commands Iago to kill Cassio and means to kill Desdemona himself. 3.4 Desdemona sends the clown to fetch Cassio. She is troubled about the loss of the handkerchief, which Emilia denies having seen. Othello arrives, and Desdemona tells him she has summoned Cassio: he feigns a cold and asks for the handkerchief. When she says she has lost it he tells her it was magically charmed to ensure the continuance of mutual love, given to his mother by a sorceress, and that its loss is ominous: as his questioning about it grows more urgent, she attempts to change the...

Romanoff and Juliet

Romanoff and Juliet  

English play (1956) and film (1961), written, produced, and directed by Sir Peter Ustinov (b. 1921). Perhaps prompted by his Russian ancestry, Ustinov provides a Cold War comedy in which ...
Shakespeare Jahrbuch

Shakespeare Jahrbuch  

German annual. Published since 1865, it is the oldest Shakespeare periodical still existing. Between 1964 and 1992, when the Cold War divided the Deutsche-Shakespeare Gesellschaft, separate issues ...
Shakespeare Jahrbuch

Shakespeare Jahrbuch   Reference library

Werner Habicht

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...Jahrbuch , German annual. Published since 1865 , it is the oldest Shakespeare periodical still existing. Between 1964 and 1992 , when the Cold War divided the Deutsche-Shakespeare Gesellschaft, separate issues were produced in East and West Germany. Its volumes contain critical articles, reviews, and documentation of Shakespeare performances in German. Werner...

Romanoff and Juliet

Romanoff and Juliet   Reference library

Tom Matheson

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...and Juliet , English play ( 1956 ) and film ( 1961 ), written, produced, and directed by Sir Peter Ustinov ( 1921–2004 ). Perhaps prompted by his Russian ancestry, Ustinov provides a Cold War comedy in which the children of the American and Russian ambassadors to ‘Concordia’ fall in love: it is a modernized version of the Romeo and Juliet story, without its tragic poetry. Tom...

twentieth- and twenty-first-century Shakespearian production

twentieth- and twenty-first-century Shakespearian production   Reference library

Dennis Kennedy, rev. Erin Sullivan

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...not be criticized openly. Yuri Lyubimov’s Hamlet (Moscow, 1971 ) is representative of the same trend in the Soviet Union, a production in which a travelling curtain, like the forces of history, swept all before it into the grave. 1980–2000 Around the end of the 1970s, as the Cold War receded and new concerns occupied artists internationally, Shakespeare performance became more varied and less predictable. Directors in the period retained most of their power, though often it was modulated by the growing importance of designers for productions that returned to...

global Shakespeare

global Shakespeare   Reference library

Alexa Huang

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...William Thomson, Shakespeare has repeatedly provided demonstration or ‘launch content’ for new communications technologies and modern media. These have included silent film, television, and the World Wide Web. Shakespeare becomes both the medium and the message. Along with post-Cold War campaigns for soft power, festivals and directors in many countries put on Shakespeare’s plays as part of their quest for cosmopolitanism. One of the key features of Shakespearian performance in our times is cross-media and cross-cultural citations. Adaptations refer to one...

Shakespeare on sound film

Shakespeare on sound film   Reference library

Anthony Davies and Will Sharpe

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...balance between concentration on characters and integration of spatial detail to chart the painful severance of the friendship between the Prince and Falstaff. It captures, too, the nostalgia for an England of the past as young and old respond in their different ways to the new, coldly efficient order imposed by Bolingbroke . If the trilogies of Olivier and Welles stand as the foundation upon which the growing edifice of Shakespearian film continues to rise, there emerged in the 1950s and early 1960s four films very different in their adaptive priorities....

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