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Cold War

Subject: History

The antagonism between the USA and USSR lasting from the late 1940s until the late 1980s, ‘cold’ because it was waged through diplomatic and ideological means rather than force. Britain ...

youth

youth   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...proverbs say that youth is frail, reckless, seldom takes heed of perils. Others sound different kinds of warning notes: ‘he that in youth no virtue uses, in age all honour him refuses’, ‘youth will to youth’ and ‘youth and age are often at debate’, or ‘after warm youth cometh cold age’. Literary texts make use of these and other stereotypes, but ‘warm youth’ is often given more sympathetic treatment. It is regularly associated with love and springtime. In Chaucer a personified Youth ‘ful of game and jolyte’ appears as a companion of Cupid love outside...

prisons and prisoners

prisons and prisoners   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...elaborate system of fees and payments: gaolers, who had no stable income, could sell food and other goods to prisoners or even quittance from ‘irons’. Escapes were frequent, and were often severely punished. Probably most prisoners had to endure discomfort, cold, smells, and boredom (alleviated for some by the carving of graffiti on the walls, as at Carlisle Castle). Chaucer's most horrific prison scene is the brief account of Ugolino ( Hugelyn ) being starved to death in a tower ( MkT VII.2407–62). There are a number of references to modes of imprisonment....

Knight's Tale, The

Knight's Tale, The   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...the knights, and vanishes. Finally, at the hour of Mars, Arcite goes to that temple, to pray for victory. The statue rings its coat of mail, and a low murmuring says ‘Victorie!’. Up in the heavens, strife breaks out between Venus and Mars. Jupiter tries to quell it, but it is the cold and sinister god Saturn ( Saturne ) with his ancient experience who promises to bring it about that Venus's knight will have his lady, and that Mars will help his knight (2209–482). ‘Part Four’ opens with a lively scene of busy preparation of armour, shields, weapons, and horses....

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