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Charles Evans Hughes

Subject: Law

(b. Glen Falls, New York, 11 Apr. 1862; d. Osterville, Massachusetts, 27 Aug. 1948) US; Governor of New York 1906–10, Republican presidential candidate 1916 Hughes, the son of a ...

Charles Evans Hughes

Charles Evans Hughes (1862–1948)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
72 words

...Charles Evans Hughes 1862 – 1948 The Constitution is what the judges say it is. Hughes later had to protest the use of the quotable comment to suggest that constitutional law is a matter of caprice. In the 1907 speech he was speaking of the dignity of the courts: “The judiciary is the safeguard of our liberty and of our property under the Constitution,” he said speech, Elmira, N.Y., May 3,...

Charles Evans Hughes Jr.

Charles Evans Hughes Jr. (1889–1950)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
91 words

...Charles Evans Hughes Jr. 1889 – 1950 The president cannot be disturbed. Charles Evans Hughes, the Republican candidate for president, retired on election night in the belief that he had won. A New York reporter called after midnight to tell him that, unexpectedly, the California vote looked close. Someone, evidently Hughes's son, put off the reporter as quoted above. “Well, when he wakes up,” the reporter advised, “just tell him he isn't president.” That was a guess, but a good one. Hughes did indeed lose to incumbent Woodrow Wilson Nov. 1916...

William Allen White

William Allen White (1868–1944)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
298 words

...Wilson, Emporia Gazette , Feb. 4, 1924 All dressed up with nowhere to go. White, the influential editor of the Emporia Gazette in Kansas, thus described the Progressive Party after Theodore Roosevelt, its candidate in 1912, endorsed Republican presidential candidate Charles Evans Hughes in 1916. According to Henry F. Woods in American Sayings (1945), White's actual words were, “all dressed up in their fighting clothes, with nowhere to go.” 1916 If ever there was a he-harlot, it was this same Warren G. Harding. attributed, c. 1926 What's the Matter with...

Woodrow Wilson

Woodrow Wilson (1856–1924)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
1,680 words

...The Senate subsequently adopted a rule allowing a two-thirds majority vote to cut off a filibuster (changed to a three-fifths majority in 1975) March 1917 Never murder a man who is committing suicide. This was Pres. Wilson's hands-off strategy for dealing with Charles Evans Hughes, his Republican opponent in the 1916 election. He attributed the precept to “a friend, who says that he has always followed the rule never to murder a man who is committing suicide.” Nevertheless, the election was quite close, with Wilson winning by less than 600,000 votes...

Samuel Johnson

Samuel Johnson (1709–84)   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
4,559 words

...I rejoice to concur with the common reader. Lives of the English Poets (1779–81) ‘Gray’ common reader common reader An exotic and irrational entertainment, which has been always combated, and always has prevailed. of Italian opera Lives of the English Poets (1779–81) ‘Hughes’ irrational entertainment irrational entertainment I am disappointed by that stroke of death, which has eclipsed the gaiety of nations and impoverished the public stock of harmless pleasure. on the death of Garrick Lives of the English Poets (1779–81) ‘Edmund Smith’ stroke of...

Samuel Johnson

Samuel Johnson (1709–84)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
10,102 words

...Poets (1779–81) ‘Gray’ character of his elegy common reader common reader literary prejudices claim to poetical honours An exotic and irrational entertainment, which has been always combated, and always has prevailed. of Italian opera Lives of the English Poets (1779–81) ‘Hughes’ irrational entertainment We are perpetually moralists, but we are geometricians only by chance. Our intercourse with intellectual nature is necessary; our speculations upon matter are voluntary and at leisure. Lives of the English Poets (1779–81) ‘Milton’ We are perpetually ...

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