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Overview

Australia

Subject: History

Australia has been establishing stronger links with Asia—but has been unable to shake off the British monarchy Australia's landmass—which can be viewed as the world's largest ...

Australia antigen

Australia antigen   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
11 words

... antigen an alternative name for hepatitis B antigen. See hepatitis...

West Australia Current

West Australia Current   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Ecology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...Australia Current The oceanic current that flows north along the western Australian coast. The flow is strong and steady in summer, reaching speeds of 20–35 cm/s, but is much reduced during the winter months. The salinity (34.5 parts per thousand) and temperature (3–7°C) are both relatively...

Australian

Australian   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Genetics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
26 words

... one of the six primary biogeographic realms ( q.v .), comprising Australia, the Celebes, New Guinea, Tasmania, New Zealand, and the oceanic islands of the South...

Australian Warblers

Australian Warblers   Reference library

The New Encyclopedia of Birds

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
1,480 words
Illustration(s):
3

... Warblers The australian warblers of the family Acanthizidae (or Pardalotidae) are also sometimes referred to as the pardalotids, the lack of a commonly agreed name reflecting the diversity of form, habitat, and behavior of the 67 living species. Usually subdued in color, they are small to medium-sized birds, ranging from the tiny weebill, weighing just 5g (0.2oz), to the Rufous bristlebird at 80g (3oz). Australian warblers are common in habitats ranging from tropical rain forest to desert, from coast to alps, and from ground to canopy. The family is...

Australian floral province

Australian floral province   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Ecology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... floral province The floral province that covers all of Australia and contains many endemics ( see endemism ). It is divided into North and East, Central, and South-west...

East Australian Current

East Australian Current   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Ecology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...Australian Current An oceanic water current that flows along the east coast of Australia. This narrow (100–200 km wide) current forms the westerly part of the anticyclonic circulation in the South Pacific. The flow velocity varies in the range 3–5 cm/s. It is an example of a western boundary current...

Australian faunal subregion

Australian faunal subregion   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Ecology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... faunal subregion A region that is distinguished by a unique marsupial (Marsupialia) fauna, including herbivores, carnivores, and insectivores. These evolved in isolation from the placental mammals (Eutheria) which now dominate the other continental faunas. In addition to marsupials there are also very primitive mammals (Monotremata), the spiny anteater and the platypus; and small rodents which are relatively recent (probably Miocene )...

West Australia Current

West Australia Current  

The oceanic current that flows north along the western Australian coast. The flow is strong and steady in summer, but is much reduced during the winter months. Low salinity (34.5 parts per thousand) ...
Australian faunal subregion

Australian faunal subregion   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Zoology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
65 words

... faunal subregion A region that is distinguished by a unique marsupial ( Marsupialia ) fauna, including herbivores, carnivores, and insectivores. These evolved in isolation from the placental mammals ( Eutheria ) which now dominate the other continental faunas. In addition to marsupials there are also very primitive mammals ( Monotremata ), the spiny ant-eater and the platypus; and small rodents which are relatively recent (probably Miocene ) immigrants. ...

Central Australian floral region

Central Australian floral region   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Ecology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...Australian floral region Part of R. Good ’s ( The Geography of the Flowering Plants , 1974 ) Australian kingdom, which accounts for most of the Australian continent, including all the central parts. The flora is imperfectly known, although the great majority of it is likely to be endemic ( see endemism ). Ecologically it coincides with extensive thorn forest , with much Acacia aneura (mulga), A. harpophylla (brigalow), and Eucalyptus hemiphloia (mallee). The flora is poor, partly because of the extensive deserts and semi-deserts that account...

Central Australian floral region

Central Australian floral region   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Plant Sciences (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
113 words

...Australian floral region Part of R. Good ’s ( The Geography of the Flowering Plants , 1974 ) Australian kingdom, which accounts for most of the Australian continent, including all the central parts. The flora is imperfectly known, although the great majority of it is likely to be endemic ( see endemism ). Ecologically it coincides with extensive thorn forest, with much Acacia aneura (mulga), A. harpophylla (brigalow), and Eucalyptus hemiphloia (mallee). The flora is poor, partly because of the extensive deserts and semi-deserts that account...

Honeyeaters and Australian Chats

Honeyeaters and Australian Chats   Reference library

The New Encyclopedia of Birds

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
2,661 words
Illustration(s):
3

...genus Anthochaera. The Australian chats of the subfamily Ephthianuridae comprise 5 species in 2 genera: the Crimson chat ( Epthianura tricolor ), Orange chat ( E. aurifrons ), White-fronted chat ( E. albifrons ), Yellow chat ( E. crocea ), and Gibber chat ( Ashbyia lovensis ). Distribution Endemic to the SW Pacific, centered in Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia, New Zealand, and Hawaii. The Australian chats are limited to Australia. Habitat Honeyeaters are found in all habitats except open, arid country and grasslands; Australian chats in open...

North and East Australian floral province

North and East Australian floral province   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Ecology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...and East Australian floral province Part of the Australian floral province that includes the forests of the eastern Northern Territories, Queensland, New South Wales, and Tasmania, and that includes many endemics ( see endemism...

south-west Australian floral region

south-west Australian floral region   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Ecology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...Australian floral region Part of R. Good ’s ( The Geography of the Flowering Plants , 1974 ) Australian floral kingdom, which is a very rich floral region with a high degree of endemism , in many respects rivalling that of the Cape region of South Africa. The same families are prominent in both floras and they have many growth forms in common. See also floral province ; floristic region...

south-west Australian floral region

south-west Australian floral region   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Plant Sciences (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
69 words

...Australian floral region Part of R. Good ’s ( The Geography of the Flowering Plants , 1974 ) Australian kingdom, which is a very rich floral region with a high degree of endemism , in many respects rivalling that of the Cape region of South Africa. The same families are prominent in both floras and they have many growth forms in common. See also floral province ; floristic region...

Magpie-larks and Australian Mudnesters

Magpie-larks and Australian Mudnesters   Reference library

The New Encyclopedia of Birds

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
802 words
Illustration(s):
4

...and Australian Mudnesters Intense social and territorial behavior patterns bind these four endemic Australian and New Guinean species. Although all four were linked in the past solely on the basis of their mud nests, it is now known that the two magpie-larks comprise their own family (Grallinidae), leaving the White-winged chough (no relation to European choughs) and the apostlebird as the Corcoracidae. Both the Magpie- and the Torrent-lark are black and white, with slight differences between the sexes. Typically for passerines, the feathering in...

Australian

Australian  

One of the six primary biogeographic realms (q.v.), comprising Australia, the Celebes, New Guinea, Tasmania, New Zealand, and the oceanic islands of the South Pacific.
Australian Warblers

Australian Warblers  

The australian warblers of the family Acanthizidae (or Pardalotidae) are also sometimes referred to as the pardalotids, the lack of a commonly agreed name reflecting the diversity of form, habitat ...
Central Australian floral region

Central Australian floral region  

Part of R. Good's (1974, The Geography of the Flowering Plants) Australian kingdom, which accounts for most of the Australian continent, including all the central parts. The flora is imperfectly ...
East Australian Current

East Australian Current  

Oceanic water current that flows along the east coast of Australia. This narrow (100–200 km wide) current forms the westerly part of the anticyclonic circulation in the S. Pacific. The flow velocity ...

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