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Overview

Australia

Subject: History

Australia has been establishing stronger links with Asia—but has been unable to shake off the British monarchy Australia's landmass—which can be viewed as the world's largest ...

Australia

Australia   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
2,715 words

... In 1990 the Australian population was 18.53 million, of whom 77.1% were Australian-born. Immigration has been a dramatic feature of the Australian demographic profile since the end of the Second World War; with a relative increase in immigrants of Asian origin since 1980 . There are 238 700 Australians of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent, or 1.4% of the general population, currently living in Australia ( 1990 census figures). This group lives primarily in rural or outback communities. Infant mortality rates are higher (up to 25 per 1000...

Australia Antigen

Australia Antigen   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Epidemiology (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...Australia Antigen Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). So called because it was first identified in an Australian aborigine. HBsAg is a biomarker for the prevalence of infection with the virus of hepatitis B. ...

Australia antigen

Australia antigen n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Nursing (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
25 words

...Australia antigen [oss- tray -liă] n. a former name for the hepatitis B antigen, which was first found in the blood of an Australian...

Australia antigen

Australia antigen   Quick reference

Concise Medical Dictionary (9 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
35 words

... antigen another name for the hepatitis B antigen, which was first discovered in the blood of an Australian aborigine. This disease is caused by a virus of which the Australia antigen forms...

Australia antigen

Australia antigen   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biomedicine

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
24 words

... antigen An aggregate of the envelope proteins of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg) found in serum of patients during phases of high...

Occupational Performance Model (Australia)

Occupational Performance Model (Australia)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...Occupational Performance Model (Australia) ( OPM(A) ) A model initially developed in 1986 at the University of Sydney, Australia, by Christine Chapparo and Judy Ranka. The aim of the model is to demonstrate the complexity of human occupational performance and to recognize the domain of concern of occupational therapy. The model comprises eight major constructs: occupational performance, occupational performance roles, occupational performance areas (rest, self-maintenance, leisure/play, productivity/school), components of occupational performance...

History of Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology in Australia

History of Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology in Australia   Reference library

Jeffrey Bond and Tony Morris

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine
Length:
11,488 words
Illustration(s):
1

...group of Australian sport, exercise, and performance psychologists. References Australian Psychological Society . (1994, October). Minutes of the 1994 Annual General Meeting of the Australian Psychological Society . Melbourne: APS. Australian Sports Commission . (2012). Australia’s Winning Edge 2012–2022 . Canberra: Australian Sports Commission. Australian Sports Commission . (2017). High Performance Strategy . Canberra: Australian Sports Commission. Bloomfield, J. (1974). The role, scope and development of recreation in Australia . Canberra:...

Australia antigen

Australia antigen  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Another name for the hepatitis B antigen, which was first discovered in the blood of an Australian aborigine. This disease is caused by a virus of which the Australia antigen forms part.
chestnut, Australian

chestnut, Australian  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Seeds of the endangered Australian tree Castanospermum australe. Poisonous when raw, but the toxins are denatured by heating. Contain castanospermine, which has antiviral activity in vitro. Also ...
Alexander technique

Alexander technique n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...technique n. A technique for improving posture, bodily movements, and breathing, thereby reducing stress and increasing confidence, popular especially with actors, musicians, and other performing artists. See also body therapies . [Named after the Australian actor and physiotherapist Frederick Mathias Alexander ( 1869–1955 ) who developed and promoted it in the...

proteome

proteome n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...by a genome , especially the human genome, each protein being potentially capable of affecting the function of cells or organs, and many interacting with other proteins. The term was coined by the US-born Australian biochemist Marc R(onald) Wilkins (born 1967 ), Vice-President of Bioinformatics at Proteome Systems Limited in Sydney, Australia, and presented at a scientific meeting in Siena in 1994 , shortly before the sequencing of the human genome. It appeared in print for the first time in an article by Wilkins and others in the journal ...

Whitten effect

Whitten effect n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...occurring only when a male or his pheromone is present. It has been observed in rats, hamsters, voles, goats, cows, sheep, and humans, and is believed to operate via the vomeronasal organ . Also called the male mouse effect . Compare Lee–Boot effect . [Named after the Australian reproductive biologist Wes (Wesley Kingston) Whitten ( 1918–2010 ) who first reported it in 1959...

Duncan’s multiple range test

Duncan’s multiple range test n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...and then the number of steps that two means are apart in this ranking is used to compute a range statistic for each comparison. Compare Bonferroni correction , least-significant difference test , Newman–Keuls test , Scheffé test , Tukey-HSD test . [Named after the Australian-born US statistician David Beattie Duncan ( 1916–2006 ) who developed it in 1955...

psychopraxia

psychopraxia n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...intended to unify psychology and parapsychology , eliminating the conceptual distinction between extra-sensory perception ( ESP ) and psychokinesis ( PK ), and also the distinction between normal information-acquisition and normal motor control. It was introduced by the Australian psychologist Michael (Anthony) Thalbourne (born 1955 ) in A Glossary of Terms Used in Parapsychology ( 1982 , pp. 62–63). psychopractic adj . Of or relating to psychopraxia. [From Greek psyche spirit or soul + praxis a deed, from prassein to...

polyonymy

polyonymy n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... n . The property of having several names. English has no equivalents for the many words for camel in Arabic, snow in the language of the Inuit Eskimos of Greenland, Canada, and Northern Alaska, or hole in the Australian aboriginal Pintupi; but on the other hand few languages have the polyonymy that English has for different types of vehicles ( car , lorry , bus , motorbike , go-cart , and so on). See also linguistic determinism . Compare polysemy . polyonymous adj . [From Greek polys many + onoma a...

Porteus Maze Test

Porteus Maze Test n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...intelligence scale by measuring aspects of intellectual ability such as foresight, planning, and prudence. It involves finding paths through a series of mazes or labyrinths, and some researchers have considered it culture-fair . PMT abbrev . [Named after the Australian psychologist Stanley D. Porteus ( 1883–1972 ) who constructed it in 1914...

big-fish-little-pond effect

big-fish-little-pond effect n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...children is high than when it is low. The effect is believed to result from social comparison processes, and it implies that children tend to have lower academic self-esteem in academically selective schools than in non-selective schools. The concept was introduced by the Australian educational psychologist Herbert W. Marsh (born 1946 ) and a colleague in an article in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology in 1984 and strongly corroborated by a survey of 4,000 15-year-olds in 26 countries published by Marsh and a colleague in the...

aptronym

aptronym n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...Head , the English neurologist; Iris C. Love , the US archaeologist who excavated the temple of Aphrodite (the Greek goddess of love) at Cnidus in Turkey in 1969 ; Gay Search, author of The Last Taboo: Sexual Abuse of Children ( 1988 ); and J. J. C. Smart , the clever Australian philosopher. See also folk etymology ( 2 ) for the aptronym Crapper , nominative determinism. [Irregular formation from Latin aptus fitting + Greek onoma or onyma a...

transliminality

transliminality n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...coined by the English chemists Francis Lawry Usher ( 1885–1969 ) and Frank Playfair Burt ( 1880–1938 ) in an article in the Annals of Psychical Science in 1909 , referring to the process whereby information crosses the threshold either into or out of consciousness. The Australian psychologist Michael (Anthony) Thalbourne (born 1955 ) introduced the noun transliminality and published the earliest version of this concept in the journal Exceptional Human Experience in 1991 . transliminal adj . [From Latin trans across + limen a threshold +...

uptalk

uptalk n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... n . An English language speech style in which intonation rises in the final syllables of sentences even if they are not questions. It is associated particularly with young people along the west coast of the United States, but it is believed to have spread from New Zealand or Australia in the 1980s, although it has been a standard feature of the speech style of Belfast, Northern Ireland, for centuries. By the beginning of the 21st century, it had become common among young speakers in the United Kingdom, Canada, South Africa, and in other English-speaking...

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