You are looking at 1-20 of 25 entries  for:

  • All: Australia x
  • History of Law x
clear all

Did you mean Australian Australian

View:

Overview

Australia

Subject: History

Australia has been establishing stronger links with Asia—but has been unable to shake off the British monarchy Australia's landmass—which can be viewed as the world's largest ...

Cartoons, Political

Cartoons, Political   Reference library

Stephen Hess

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Political and Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics, Law, History of Law
Length:
1,114 words

...at the Washington Post . Paul Conrad brought liberalism to the West Coast, where his cartoons on Watergate in the Los Angeles Times earned the honor of being the only cartoonist on Nixon ’s “enemies list.” Pat Oliphant arrived in the United States in 1964 from Australia and won the Pulitzer Prize in his first year with the Denver Post . Bill Mauldin in civilian life at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the Chicago Sun Times is best remembered for his iconic obituary cartoon of Lincoln grieving for the murdered John Kennedy . Herblock...

doctrine of tenure

doctrine of tenure  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The common law doctrine that describes how a person holds a freehold estate in land from the Crown as absolute owner, or from a superior estate holder in a feudal ...
judicial power

judicial power  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Broadly, the independent power granted to the courts by Constitution Ch III; the judicial power of the Commonwealth; or judicial power as a general, abstract concept that is extremely difficult ...
doctrine of Estates

doctrine of Estates  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The common law doctrine that provides for successive interests in land and establishes which holder of the multiple possible interests in land (freehold, leasehold and life estates) is entitled to ...
elderlaw

elderlaw  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A growing practice area covering a range of legal aspects of aging, including in particular the contractual and regulatory regime of retirement villages and aged care facilities, wills, advance ...
company law

company law  

Reference type:
Overview Page
One of the eleven core subjects a law student must pass to qualify as a candidate for admission to practise law. See Priestley eleven.Although company formation has largely been ...
subinfeudation

subinfeudation  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The system in English feudal law by which a tenant could sublet to others.
real action

real action  

Reference type:
Overview Page
An action utilised in the medieval common law courts to recover a particular thing (the res). Real actions were only available in matters involving estates in land and did not ...
Maori Law

Maori Law  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Tikanga Māori and “Maori customary law” are terms (not necessarily interchangeable) embodying the values, standards, principles, or norms that indigenous Maori societies have developed to govern ...
ius

ius  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Ius, a Latin noun found in virtually every area of Roman law, has been described as capable of many meanings and even more mental associations. Its etymological roots are uncertain. ...
guilt

guilt  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The determination of criminal responsibility by a court. In order for the accused to be found guilty the prosecution must prove all the elements of the crime beyond reasonable doubt ...
private law

private law  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The part of the law that deals with such aspects of relationships between individuals that are of no direct concern to the state. It includes the law of property and of trusts, family law, the law of ...
feminist legal theory

feminist legal theory  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A broad movement that seeks to show how conventional legal theory, far from being gender-blind, ignores the position and perspective of women. Feminist writers examine the inequalities to be found in ...
legal realism

legal realism  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A largely instrumental and empirical approach to law developed in the first half of the 20th century in the USA (American legal realism) and Scandinavia ( Scandinavian legal realism). It rejects the ...
Institute of Pacific Relations

Institute of Pacific Relations   Reference library

T. Christopher Jespersen

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Political and Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics, Law, History of Law
Length:
358 words

...(YMCA), the Institute for Pacific Relations (IPR) sought to advance understanding of Asia through conferences with Asian leaders, annual meetings, research, and publications. By 1939 , eleven national IPR councils had been established in the United States , Canada , Australia , New Zealand , China , Japan , the Philippines , the Soviet Union, the Netherlands , Great Britain , and France . From the start, the American council exerted the greatest influence because of its size (nearly 1,400 members by 1939 ) and fund-raising abilities. In the ...

Single Tax Movement

Single Tax Movement   Reference library

Steven J. Ross

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Political and Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics, Law, History of Law
Length:
383 words

...during George ’s trips to England and Ireland in the 1880 s and his unsuccessful campaigns for mayor of New York City in 1886 and 1897 . Despite George ’s death in 1897 , the movement over the next several decades spread throughout the United States , Canada , Australia , Great Britain, Denmark , and Hungary . The Single Tax was opposed by economists, who thought it un-workable, and by wealthy landowners, church-es, and farmers who feared losing their lands or profits. Although the movement declined after the 1920 s, a number of Single Tax...

MacArthur, Douglas

MacArthur, Douglas   Reference library

Glen Jeansonne and David Luhrssen

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Political and Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics, Law, History of Law
Length:
602 words

...the Great Depression, but was distrusted by the president. In 1935 he was sent to the Philippines to organize that nation’s rudimentary military. Accused of being unprepared for Japan ’s as-sault in December 1941 , MacArthur fought a defensive action before escaping to Australia . As Allied supreme commander in the Pacific, he was an architect of war strategy along with Admiral Chester Nimitz. MacArthur accept-ed Japan ’s surrender in September 1945 and governed the conquered nation through 1951 . Credited with redirecting Japanese institutions...

VOTING SYSTEMS

VOTING SYSTEMS  

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Political and Legal History

...the move to secret voting. Ballot Secrecy and Its Consequences.   The central characteristics of the Australian or secret ballot reflect elements of the distinctive political culture of the nation that invented it: an obsession with privacy and a willingness to delegate to the state activities and functions performed elsewhere by nonstate associations and organizations. The fundamental features of the ballot form pioneered in Australia in the mid- 1850 s and adopted in the United Kingdom and Canada in the 1870 s are readily summarized: a...

Third Parties

Third Parties   Reference library

Ronald B. Rapoport

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Political and Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics, Law, History of Law
Length:
3,220 words

...to running candidates, it is not surprising that ballot access has received prominent attention. Ballot access became a significant formal hurdle after the introduction of the Australian ballot, which was in place in almost every state by 1892 . Prior to the Australian ballot parties printed their own ballots, so the number of party ballots was unlimited. However, under the Australian ballot reform, states, now responsible for printing official ballots, had to determine rules to get on the ballot so the ballot could be printed before the election. These...

DEFENSE DEPARTMENT

DEFENSE DEPARTMENT  

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Political and Legal History

...the core of the force. The 2003 invasion of Iraq ( March 19 – 1 May 2003 ) was the start of the conflict known as the Iraq War, or Operation Iraqi Freedom, in which a combined force of troops from the United States , the United Kingdom, and small- er contingents from Australia and Poland invaded Iraq and toppled the regime of Saddam Hussein in twenty-one days of major combat operations. This phase (March– April 2003 ) consisted of a conventionally fought war, which concluded with the fall of the Iraq capital Baghdad. This was considered a...

View: