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Australia

Subject: History

Australia has been establishing stronger links with Asia—but has been unable to shake off the British monarchy Australia's landmass—which can be viewed as the world's largest ...

Australian Aborigine Creation

Australian Aborigine Creation   Reference library

A Dictionary of Creation Myths

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

... Aborigine Creation Several origin myths belong to many of the aboriginal people. The Arandans, the Murngins, and the Great Western Desert people, for instance, tell of a prehuman “dream time” during which magical ancestors created sites, traditions, and people during their “walkabouts” ( see also Djanggawul Creation ; The Dreaming ; Ngurunderi Creation ). Often the ancestors became lizards (or other animals), gave birth to more lizards, and then, warmed by the sun, turned as a group into humans. The Dieri god made the first man in the form of a...

Yurlunggur

Yurlunggur   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

...Yurlunggur was a rainbow serpent of the Yolngu in Australian Arnhem...

Ngandjala-Ngandjala

Ngandjala-Ngandjala   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

...These are Australian Aboriginal tricksters . Essentially, they are comic troublemakers and pranksters who enjoy destroying things such as those created by the first beings during the dreaming time. In parts of Australia they are called Wurulu-...

Wandjina

Wandjina   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

...Among the Australian Aboriginal people, a wandjina is a tribe-protecting spirit being of the mythical age the Dreamtime . A wandjina has a particular totem animal...

Alchera

Alchera (Oceania)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

... Oceania Literally, ‘dream time’. The remote period of time in which the ancestral spirits of aboriginal tribes in Australia walked the earth. The chthonic ancestors are believed to have returned to their abode...

Bamapana

Bamapana (Oceania)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

... Oceania The trickster hero of the Murngin in northern Australia, ‘a crazy man’. To the open horror and hidden delight of these aboriginal tribesmen Bamapana was obscene and broke clan incest taboos. The quarrels and misunderstandings he caused were...

Mimi

Mimi   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

...The mimi are Australian trickster spirits among the Aborigines of western Arnhem land. For the most part they are benign, living in the crevices of rock cliffs. They can, however, be troublesome if...

Mudungkala

Mudungkala   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

...The Tiwi people of the Melville and Bathurst islands of Australia say that they were separated from the mainland during the dreaming time when water followed the dreaming travel of Mudungkala, a goddess who came out of the earth with the first ...

Namorodo

Namorodo   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

...Monster-like tricksters of Aboriginal Australia , the Nomorodo fly about during the night and kill people with their horrible claws. They can prevent the proper repose of the souls of the...

Argula

Argula   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

...Argula is a trickster among the aboriginal people of western Kimberley in Australia. Traditionally, he paints ritual pictures of people who have committed wrongs, and who will die when insulting songs are sung to the...

Creation from Ancestors

Creation from Ancestors   Reference library

A Dictionary of Creation Myths

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...from Ancestors In many cultures creation was by tribal ancestors. This is particularly true of the Australian aborigines, whose first ancestors “dreamed” their particular “worlds” into existence ( see also Arandan Creation ; Djanggawul Creation ; The Dreaming ; Ngurunderi Creation...

Seven sisters

Seven sisters   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

...sisters The Kuungarankalpa (“Seven Sisters”) are heroines of the Aboriginal Australian dreaming , the mythical creation process . As the seven sisters fled before a pursuing lecher, Nyiru, aspects of the Australian landscape followed in their path—remnants of their camping and other activities. When they reached the southern coast they fled into the sea and then into the sky, where they became the constellation known in the West as the Pleiades...

Dhakhan

Dhakhan (Oceania)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

... Oceania The Kabi tribe on the Queensland coast of Australia worship Dhakhan, the rainbow, an ancestral spirit part fish and part snake that resides in deep water holes. He appears in the sky as a rainbow when he is passing from one water hole to the...

Kunapipi

Kunapipi (Oceania)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

... Oceania The mother goddess of the aboriginal tribes of northern Australia. Now a vague, otiose, spiritual being, ‘the old woman’ once travelled across the land with a band of heroes and heroines, and during the ancestral period she gave birth to men and women as well as creating the natural species. A ‘rainbow serpent’ went before in order to prepare her...

Purukupali

Purukupali   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

...The son of the Australian Aboriginal Dreamtime goddess Mudungkala , Purukupali was betrayed by his wife and a man known as the Moon Man. In the process Purukupali’s son died, and in a fit of anger Purukupali instituted the reality of death in human...

Djunggun

Djunggun   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

...In the western Kimberley region of Australia the people tell how a man or primordial being named Djunggun and his friend Wodoy married each other's daughters. But when Djunggun tried to possess his own daughter, Wodoy killed him, putting an end to the all-too-common practice of incestuous...

Djanggawul

Djanggawul   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

...In eastern Arnheim Land in Aboriginal Australia, Djanggawul and his two sisters were primordial beings involved in the creative process known as the dreaming . The three beings traveled about the country in a bark canoe. Djanggawul had a very long, uncircumcised and decorated penis, and his sisters had exaggerated clitorises. Whenever these beings came to a land mass, they beached their canoe and walked around, their sex organs dragging on the ground, leaving various sacred markings still present today. The trio also left “dreamings” in the form of...

Auwa

Auwa (Oceania)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

... Oceania The sacred places of origin of the pulwaiya , ‘ancestors’. Among the Wikmunkan tribesmen of northern Australia, the auwa, or totem centres, are the nests and breeding places of birds and animals. Each auwa has its own peculiar characteristics, though there is always water near by in the shape of a stream, lagoon, or water hole. The totemic ancestors are thought to reside and to play about the vicinity of the auwa. Near these subterranean spirits the great tribal ceremonies take place, and in some areas it is possible to find old rock paintings...

bòcan

bòcan   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

... [ScG], bócan [Ir.], bauchan , bogan , buckawn . . A hobgoblin, sprite, or spectre chiefly known in Gaelic Scotland but also in Ireland, North America, and Australia. The bòcan could be a shape-shifter and a trickster; he was usually dangerous but sometimes helpful. Often a bòcan would attach itself to a family, such as the Coluinn (or Colann) gun Cheann [ScG, headless body] of the MacDonalds of Morar, west Highlands (until 1974 , Inverness-shire). See also ATHACH...

Bell Bird brothers

Bell Bird brothers   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

...Bird brothers The two Bell Bird brothers of the Australian Dreaming mythology were out hunting an emu who was drinking from a pool near the rock of Uluru when a young woman lost control of a dish she was carrying on her head. The fall of the object frightened the emu, who ran off. To this day a rock pool in Uluru is said to be the one from which the emu was drinking, and the indentation near the rock is attributed to the object that fell from the girl's...

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