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Alexander the Great

[Na] Leader of the Macedonians. Born in 356 bc, Alexander was tutored in his early years by Aristotle before succeeding his father Philip as king of Macedonia and the mainland of ...

headstrong

headstrong adj.   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
200 words

..., at H1. • “His underlying message was more subtle: Republicans should not rush headstrong [read headlong ] this early into backing either of the two most popular contenders: Gov. George W. Bush of Texas or Elizabeth Dole.” Richard L. Berke , “Lamar Alexander Declares Run for President in 2000 ,” N.Y. Times , 10 Mar. 1999 , at A15. Sometimes the senses truly seem to merge, as headstrong takes on an adverbial quality more evocative than headlong —e.g.: “Creationists have run headstrong into teachers and scientists who have effectively lobbied...

elope

elope   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
258 words

...the impression that the latter had eloped with his wife, and was secreting himself in that vicinity, it is difficult to see upon what principle his threats in that connection were excluded.” Alexander v. United States , 138 U.S. 353, 356 ( 1891 ). • “James Campbell had eloped with the wife of one Ludlow.” Adger v. Ackerman , 115 F. 124, 130 (8th Cir. 1902 ). Today the word does not ordinarily apply exclusively to women. It may, of course, as here: “After an idyllic childhood, Anderson impulsively eloped at 18 and endured a wedding night that she...

du jour

du jour   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
475 words

...1998 , South Weekly §, at 1. • “The soup de jour [read du jour ] features such varieties as collard green or garbanzo bean.” Carol Jeffares Hedman , “Easter Meals Served Up with a View,” Tampa Trib . , 20 Apr. 2000 , Fla. §, at 8. • “The Bengals are the team de jour [read du jour ] in the NFL.” Mark Curnutte , “Rushing Defense a Concern,” Cincinnati Enquirer , 20 Sept. 2005 , at C1. ✳De jour could become the great misspelling of our day. In French, by the way, du is a sort of contraction for de le in the same way that au is for á le . ...

etc

etc   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
702 words

...appropriate: “The presidential heavyweight hopefuls—Dole, Sen. Phil Gramm, ex-Tennessee Gov. Lamar Alexander, etc . [read et al .]—were present and accounted for at the GOP Midwest leadership conference in Green Bay over the weekend.” “Lake Jump,” Chicago Trib . , 22 May 1995 , § 1, at 12. See et al . Language-Change Index etc . misused for et al .: Stage 3 D. Misspelled and Mispronounced. When spelled out, the Latin words should be separate <et cetera> . When pronounced, the term should not be shortened to three syllables—so /et set -ә-rә/ , not...

phenomenon

phenomenon   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
791 words

...several phenomenon [read phenomena ] in the earth including the well-known jerkiness in the planet's rotational rate.” George Alexander , “Cat Scans Used to Explore the Earth,” N.Y. Times , 16 Dec. 1986 , at C3. Cf. criterion & media . Language-Change Index phenomenon as false plural for phenomena : Stage 1 C. And phenomenons , phenom(s) . Even though phenomena is the accepted plural, some people erroneously write phenomenons —e.g.: • “The seven-day week, alone among the components of the calendar, has always been thought to be a...

pleaded

pleaded   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
799 words

... are used as the past tense.” Clarence Stratton , Handbook of English 245 ( 1940 ). • “ Pleaded is the approved past tense of plead . thus : He pleaded (not ‘pled’ or ‘plead’) not guilty .” Alexander M. Witherspoon , Common Errors in English and How to Avoid Them 135 ( 1943 ). • “The past and p.p. are pleaded . Pled is now colloq. or dial. (or Sc.).” Margaret Nicholson , DAEU at 427. The problem with these strong pronouncements, of course, is that ✳pled and ✳plead have gained some standing in AmE, as the Evanses noted in the 1950s...

alexandrine

alexandrine   Reference library

Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

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Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
110 words

...of twelve syllables (the French vers héroïque ), used in English, for example, as the last line of a Spenserian stanza ( All things decay in time and to their end do draw ) or as a variant in a poem of heroic couplets, rarely in a whole work. In Fr. the alexandrine is found, for example, in Alexandre de Bernay’s dodecasyllabic version (late 12c.) of the great cyclic Roman d’Alexandre (e.g. D’Alixandre vous vœil l’istorie rafreschir ). The most famous English example is Alexander Pope’s couplet, A needless Alexandrine ends the song, That, like a wounded...

epithet

epithet   Quick reference

Fowler’s Concise Dictionary of Modern English Usage (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
116 words

...(good or bad) which the speaker or writer (or the verdict of history) regards as characteristic of a person or thing, e.g. Charles the Bold, Ethelred the Unready, Philip the Good, William the Silent , and many figures ( Alexander, Alfred, Peter, Pompey , etc.) called the Great . An epithet can also be a noun used as a significant title or appellation, e.g. William the Conqueror, Vlad the Impaler . In more casual use, epithet simply means ‘description’ or ‘name’: This is a character who is quite happy to be known by the epithet ‘Dopey’, having...

legendary

legendary   Quick reference

Fowler’s Concise Dictionary of Modern English Usage (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
198 words

...of the parent word legend to refer to contemporary celebrities such as film stars and pop ‘idols’ (another such word, now giving way to icon ). These uses of legendary raise our hopes only to dash them in mild absurdity. When it is used in contexts that are specifically centred on history and not legend the effect can be laughably incongruous: ☒ Oliver Stone’s biopic of the legendary leader [Alexander the Great] who ruled faraway lands more than 300 years before the birth of Christ — Independent , 2004 . Use it...

tele-

tele-   Reference library

Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
275 words

...( evision ) + evangelist ) and Telex ( tele ( printer ) + ex ( change )). Great technological developments over the centuries are mirrored in the use of tele - as a formative element: telescope (first recorded in 1648 ), telegraph ( 1794 ), telegram ( 1852 ), telephone (in the modern Alexander Graham Bell sense, 1876 ), telepathy ( 1882 ), and television ( 1907 ). One wonders what new central concept will be captured in new uses of tele - in the 21c. Meanwhile the limitless class of tele -words is joined, almost daily, it would seem, by...

suffixes added to proper names

suffixes added to proper names   Quick reference

Fowler’s Concise Dictionary of Modern English Usage (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
211 words

...e.g. Alexandrian (normally referring to the city of Alexandria or the literature or philosophy associated with it rather than to Alexander the Great). More recent formations include Beethovenian and Shavian , the latter derived from a Latinate form of the name of G. B. Shaw for reasons of euphony. Euphony often calls for use of other suffixes, such as - esque (from French, e.g. Dantesque, Schumannesque, Turneresque ) and - ic ( Byronic , Platonic, Pindaric, Ptolemaic ), although in some cases the reason for a particular choice of suffix is less...

epithet

epithet   Reference library

Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
318 words

...bad) which the speaker or writer (or the verdict of history) regards as characteristic of a person or thing, e.g. Charles the Bold, Ethelred the Unready, Philip the Good, William the Silent , and many figures ( Alexander, Alfred, Peter, Pompey , etc.) called the Great . An epithet can also be a noun used as a significant title or appellation, e.g. William the Conqueror, Vlad the Impaler . These uses continue, particularly with unfavourable connotations. In particular, the word is often used as a euphemism for a term of abuse, particularly in the phrase ...

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