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Alexander the Great

[Na] Leader of the Macedonians. Born in 356 bc, Alexander was tutored in his early years by Aristotle before succeeding his father Philip as king of Macedonia and the mainland of ...

Alexander the Great

Alexander the Great (356–323 bc)   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
119 words

...00theGreat Alexander the Great 356 – 323 bc Greek monarch , King of Macedon from 336 bc If I were not Alexander, I would be Diogenes. Plutarch Parallel Lives ‘Alexander’ ch. 14, sect. 3 not Alexander would be Diogenes Is it not worthy of tears that, when the number of worlds is infinite, we have not yet become lords of a single one? when asked why he wept on hearing from Anaxarchus that there was an infinite number of worlds Plutarch Moralia ‘On Tranquillity of the Mind’ number of worlds is infinite number of worlds is infinite I am...

Alexander the Great

Alexander the Great (356–323 bc)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
124 words

...001the0Great Alexander the Great 356 – 323 bc Greek monarch , King of Macedon from 336 bc . See also diogenes If I were not Alexander, I would be Diogenes. Plutarch Parallel Lives ‘Alexander’ ch. 14, sect. 3 not Alexander would be Diogenes Is it not worthy of tears that, when the number of worlds is infinite, we have not yet become lords of a single one? when asked why he wept on hearing from Anaxarchus that there was an infinite number of worlds Plutarch Moralia ‘On Tranquillity of the Mind’; see watts number of worlds is...

Alexander the Great

Alexander the Great (356323 )   Reference library

Brewer's Famous Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
283 words

...Alexander the Great 356 323 King of Macedonia I am dying with the help of too many physicians. Last words, attributed in The Treasury of Humorous Quotations , eds Esar & Bentley (1951); and earlier, in the form ‘I die by the help of too many physicians’, in H.L. Mencken's Dictionary of Quotations (1942). No other evidence has been found to support this attribution. The idea, however, surfaces elsewhere in the classical world. The dying Emperor Hadrian ( ad 76–138) apparently came out with ‘the popular saying “many physicians have slain a king”’...

Diogenes c.400–c.325 bc

Diogenes c.400–c.325 bc   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

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Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
41 words

...Diogenes c.400–c.325 bc If I were not Alexander, I would be Diogenes. Alexander the Great 356 – 323 bc Greek monarch , King of Macedon from 336 bc Plutarch Parallel Lives ‘Alexander’ ch. 14, sect. 3 not Alexander would be ...

Cecil Frances Alexander

Cecil Frances Alexander (1818–95)   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
195 words

...0Cecil0Frances Cecil Frances Alexander 1818 – 95 Irish poet and hymn-writer All things bright and beautiful, All creatures great and small, All things wise and wonderful, The Lord God made them all. ‘All Things Bright and Beautiful’ (1848) All things bright and beautiful All things bright and beautiful creatures great and small The rich man in his castle, The poor man at his gate, God made them, high or lowly, And ordered their estate. ‘All Things Bright and Beautiful’ (1848) rich man in his castle rich man in his castle poor man at his...

Alexander Solzhenitsyn

Alexander Solzhenitsyn (1918–2008)   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

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Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
317 words

...a great writer…is like having another government. That's why no regime has ever loved great writers, only minor ones. The First Circle (1968) ch. 57, tr. M. Guybon The line dividing good and evil cuts through the heart of every human being. And who is willing to destroy a piece of his own heart? The Gulag Archipelago (1973–5) Work was like a stick. It had two ends. When you worked for the knowing you gave them quality; when you worked for a fool you simply gave him eye-wash. One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich (1962) How can you expect a man who's warm to...

Deception

Deception   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
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Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
607 words

...even fool some of the people all the time; but you can't fool all of the people all the time. also attributed to Phineas Barnum Abraham Lincoln 1809 – 65 American statesman , 16th President 1861–5 Alexander K. McClure Lincoln's Yarns and Stories (1904) fool all the people fool all the people fool some of the people And if, to be sure, sometimes you need to conceal a fact with words, do it in such a way that it does not become known, or, if it does become known, that you have a ready and quick defence. Niccolò Machiavelli 1469 – 1527 ...

Propaganda

Propaganda   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
347 words

...– 89 French queen consort Isaac D'Israeli Curiosities of Literature Second Series vol. 2 (1849) In our country the lie has become not just a moral category but a pillar of the State. Alexander Solzhenitsyn 1918 – 2008 Russian novelist 1974 interview, in The Oak and the Calf ...

Audiences

Audiences   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Humorous Quotations (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
265 words

...tie their tomatoes on on the end of a yo-yo There was laughter in the back of the theatre, leading to the belief that someone was telling jokes back there. George S. Kaufman 1889 – 1961 American dramatist : Howard Teichmann George S. Kaufman (1973) laughter in the back of the theatre someone was telling jokes There still remains, to mortify a wit, The many-headed monster of the pit. Alexander Pope 1688 – 1744 English poet : Imitations of Horace (1737) many-headed monster of the pit many-headed monster of the pit I know two kinds of...

Hosts and Guests

Hosts and Guests   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
381 words

...grave or the glass flowers at Harvard.’ Marianne Moore 1887 – 1972 American poet ‘Silence’ (1935) superior people never make long visits Superior people never make long visits shown Longfellow's grave For I, who hold sage Homer's rule the best, Welcome the coming, speed the going guest. Alexander Pope 1688 – 1744 English poet Imitations of Horace bk. 2, Satire 2 (1734) l. 159; Pope's translation of The Odyssey (1725–6) bk. 15, l. 84, has ‘Speed the parting guest’ speed the parting guest Speed the parting guest Speed the parting ...

Literature and Society

Literature and Society   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

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Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
477 words

...M. Contat and M. Rybalka (eds.) Les Écrits de Sartre (1970) writer must refuse transformed into an institution For a country to have a great writer…is like having another government. That's why no regime has ever loved great writers, only minor ones. Alexander Solzhenitsyn 1918 – 2008 Russian novelist The First Circle (1968) ch. 57, tr. M. Guybon There are various forms of production: artillery, automobiles, lorries. You also produce ‘commodities’, ‘works’, ‘products’. Such things are highly necessary. Engineering things. For people's souls....

Russia

Russia   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
532 words

...of the Communist Party of the USSR 1985–91 and President 1988–91 speech on the seventieth anniversary of the Russian Revolution, 2 November 1987 restructuring [ perestroika ] Russia has two generals in whom she can confide—Generals Janvier [ January ] and Février [ February ] . Nicholas I 1796 – 1855 Russian monarch , emperor from 1825 attributed; in Punch 10 March 1855 Russia has two generals Russia has two generals Janvier and Février Janvier and Février Moscow: those syllables can start A tumult in the Russian heart. Alexander ...

Teaching

Teaching   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
579 words

...and great teachers: good teachers make the best of a pupil's means: great teachers foresee a pupil's ends. Maria Callas 1923 – 77 American -born operatic soprano Kenneth Harris Talking To (1971) ‘Maria Callas’ A man who reviews the old so as to find out the new is qualified to teach others. Confucius ( K'ung Fu-tzu ) 551 – 479 bc Chinese philosopher Analects ch. 2, v. 11, tr. Wing-Tsit Chan C-l-e-a-n, clean, verb active, to make bright, to scour. W-i-n, win, d-e-r, der, winder, a casement. When the boy knows this out of the book, he...

Telegrams

Telegrams   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Humorous Quotations (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
884 words

...new? Dorothy Parker 1893 – 1967 American critic and humorist : S. T. Brownlow (ed.) The Sayings of Dorothy Parker (1992) what's new Satisfied great success. reply to telegram from Billy Rose, suggesting that reorchestration by Robert Russell Bennett might make a ballet which was ‘a great success’ even more successful Igor Stravinsky 1882 – 1971 Russian composer : in Ned Sherrin in his Anecdotage (1993) satisfied great success Satisfied great success cables were soon arriving…‘Require earliest name life story photograph American nurse...

Dorothy Parker

Dorothy Parker (1893–1967)   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

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Current Version:
2018
Subject:
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Length:
597 words

...‘Unfortunate Coincidence’ (1937) One of you is lying Excuse my dust. suggested epitaph for herself (1925) Alexander Woollcott While Rome Burns (1934) ‘Our Mrs Parker’ excuse my dust Excuse my dust It is our national joy to mistake for the first-rate, the fecund rate. in New Yorker 16 March 1929 She ran the whole gamut of the emotions from A to B. of Katharine Hepburn at a Broadway first night, 1933 attributed gamut of the emotions gamut of the emotions from a to B There's a hell of a distance between wise-cracking and wit. Wit has truth in it;...

The Universe

The Universe   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
723 words

... Universe The Universe see also Earth , Skies , Space Is it not worthy of tears that, when the number of worlds is infinite, we have not yet become lords of a single one? when asked why he wept on hearing from Anaxarchus that there was an infinite number of worlds Alexander the Great 356 – 323 bc Greek monarch , King of Macedon from 336 bc Plutarch Moralia ‘On Tranquillity of the Mind’ number of worlds is infinite number of worlds is infinite Had I been present at the Creation, I would have given some useful hints for the better ordering...

Aristocracy

Aristocracy   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
526 words

...keep up as two Dreadnoughts; and dukes are just as great a terror and they last longer. David Lloyd George 1863 – 1945 British Liberal statesman ; Prime Minister, 1916–22 speech at Newcastle, 9 October 1909 An aristocracy in a republic is like a chicken whose head has been cut off: it may run about in a lively way, but in fact it is dead. Nancy Mitford 1904 – 73 English writer Noblesse Oblige (1956) What can ennoble sots, or slaves, or cowards? Alas! Not all the blood of all the Howards. Alexander Pope 1688 – 1744 English poet An Essay on...

Animals

Animals   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
944 words

...Animals see also Animal Rights , Birds , Cats , Dogs , Horses All things bright and beautiful, All creatures great and small, All things wise and wonderful, The Lord God made them all. Cecil Frances Alexander 1818 – 95 Irish poet and hymn-writer ‘All Things Bright and Beautiful’ (1848) All things bright and beautiful All things bright and beautiful creatures great and small Old pond, leap-splash— a frog. Matsuo Basho 1644 – 94 Japanese poet tr. Lucien Stryk When people call this beast to mind, They marvel more and more At such...

Intelligence

Intelligence   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
552 words

...of Samuel Johnson (1791) June 1784 I have found you an argument find you an understanding The height of cleverness is to be able to conceal it. Duc de la Rochefoucauld 1613 – 80 French moralist Maximes (1678) no. 245 height of cleverness able to conceal it No one in this world, so far as I know—and I have searched the records for years, and employed agents to help me—has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the great masses of the plain people. H. L. Mencken 1880 – 1956 American journalist and literary critic in ...

Snobbery

Snobbery   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Humorous Quotations (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
984 words

...is no stronger craving in the world than that of the rich for titles, except perhaps that of the titled for riches. Hesketh Pearson 1887 – 1964 English actor and biographer : The Pilgrim Daughters (1961) no stronger craving that of the rich for titles that of the titled for riches I am his Highness' dog at Kew; Pray, tell me sir, whose dog are you? Alexander Pope 1688 – 1744 English poet : ‘Epigram Engraved on the Collar of a Dog which I gave to his Royal Highness’ (1738) Whose dog are you You can be in the Horseguards and still be...

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