You are looking at 1-20 of 501 entries  for:

  • All: Alexander the Great x
clear all

View:

Overview

Alexander the Great

[Na] Leader of the Macedonians. Born in 356 bc, Alexander was tutored in his early years by Aristotle before succeeding his father Philip as king of Macedonia and the mainland of ...

HAMILTON, Alexander

HAMILTON, Alexander (1757–1804)   Reference library

Rick Kennedy

Dictionary of Early American Philosophers

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...L. Alexander Hamilton and American Foreign Policy: A Design for Greatness (Norman, Okla., 1970). McDonald, Forrest . Alexander Hamilton: A Biography (New York, 1979). Mitchell, Broadus . Alexander Hamilton , 2 vols. (New York, 1957, 1962). Miller, John C. Alexander Hamilton: Portrait in Paradox (New York, 1959). Morris, Richard B. Witnesses at the Creation: Hamilton, Madison, Jay and the Constitution (New York, 1985). Rossiter, Clinton L. Alexander Hamilton and the Constitution (New York, 1964). Stourzh, Gerald . Alexander Hamilton and the Idea...

ALEXANDER, Archibald

ALEXANDER, Archibald (1772–1851)   Reference library

Timothy McConnell

Dictionary of Early American Philosophers

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...known as the Natural Bridge. During his teenage years, he was exposed to a number of adherents to the revivalist spirituality of the Second Great Awakening, including the growing Baptist movement in Virginia. Alexander spent a year during 1788–89 as a tutor in the family and household of General John Posey , a decorated veteran of the Revolutionary War, at his estate known as The Wilderness west of Fredericksburg. He educated the General’s children in Latin and pursued his own academic development. Among his duties was also the regular reading of sermons...

STEPHENS, Alexander Hamilton

STEPHENS, Alexander Hamilton (1812–1883)   Reference library

Brian E. Butler

Dictionary of Early American Philosophers

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Hubbell, John T. “ Three Georgia Unionists and the Compromise of 1850 ,” Georgia Historical Quarterly 51 (1967): 307–23. Johnston, Richard M. , and William H. Browne . Life of Alexander H. Stephens (Philadelphia, 1978). Knight, Lucian L. Alexander H. Stephens, the Sage of Liberty Hall: Georgia’s Great Commoner (Liberty Hall, Georgia, 1994). Norton, Frank H. The Life of Alexander H. Stephens (New York, 1883). Pendleton, Louis . Alexander H. Stephens (Philadelphia, 1908). Rabun, James Z. “ Alexander H. Stephens and Jefferson Davis ,” American...

CAMPBELL, Alexander

CAMPBELL, Alexander (1788–1866)   Reference library

Elmer Duncan

Dictionary of Early American Philosophers

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Bio, Dict Amer Religious Bio, Nat Cycl Amer Bio, WWWHV Eames, S. Morris . The Philosophy of Alexander Campbell (Bethany, W.V., 1966). Contain a bibliography of Campbell’s writings. Foster, Douglas , et al. The Encyclopedia of the Stone-Campbell Movement (Grand Rapids, Mich., 2005). Lunger, Harold L. The Political Ethics of Alexander Campbell (St. Louis, 1954). Madden, Edward H. , and Dennis W. Madden . “ The Great Debate: Alexander Campbell vs. Robert Owen ,” Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 18 (Summer 1982): 207–26. McAllister, Lester ,...

HODGE, Charles

HODGE, Charles (1797–1878)   Reference library

C. George Fry

Dictionary of Early American Philosophers

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...the next sixty-eight years. While attending Princeton College, Hodge was converted, and following his graduation with the BA degree in 1815 , he attended Princeton Seminary, finishing his studies in 1819 . Hodge embraced the theology and philosophy of Archibald ALEXANDER , the first professor of Princeton Theological Seminary and the founder of the famed and influential “Princeton Theology,” a view dominant in Presbyterianism until the 1920s. Coming to Princeton Seminary at its founding in 1812 , Alexander had stressed a High Calvinism that combined the...

Baumgarten, Alexander Gottlieb

Baumgarten, Alexander Gottlieb (1714)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
1,104 words

...Alexander Gottlieb ( 1714 – 1762 ), German philosopher who was influential as the author of the textbooks on metaphysics and ethics on which Immanuel Kant lectured. Baumgarten's significance for aesthetics lies not only in his coinage of the term aesthetics for the philosophy of art but also in his creation of a paradigm for understanding art that was profoundly influential in his own time and has continued to be so, although indirectly, down to the present. Born in Berlin and educated in the Pietist orphanage and university of Halle,...

Crummell, Alexander

Crummell, Alexander   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of African Thought

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Regional and National History, Philosophy
Length:
1,735 words
Illustration(s):
1

...Negro University Press, 1969. Crummell, Alexander . The Future of Africa Being Addresses, Sermons, Etc., Etc., Delivered in the Republic of Liberia . New York: Charles Scribner 1862. Reprint, Detriot, Mich.: Negro History Press, 1969. Crummell, Alexander . The Greatness of Christ and Other Sermons by Rev. Alex. Crummell . New York: T. Whittaker, 1882. Crummell, Alexander . The Relations and Duties of Free Colored Men in America to Africa . Hartford, Conn.: Press of Case, Lockwood and Company, 1861. Miller, Floyd . The Search for a Nationality: Black...

Luria, Alexander Romanovich

Luria, Alexander Romanovich (1902–77)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
655 words

...Alexander Romanovich ( 1902–77 ). Soviet psychologist , probably the only one to become generally known outside the USSR after the Second World War. Born in Kazan of Jewish extraction, Luria was educated at the University of Kazan and graduated in social sciences in spite of his father's wish that he should qualify in medicine, which in fact he did several years later when his career in psychology underwent an unexpected check. His interest in psychology developed rapidly and while still a student he had the temerity to found a psychoanalytic circle in...

Mendelssohn, Moses

Mendelssohn, Moses (1729)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
831 words

...Lectures on the Existence of God ( 1785 ); many works of Jewish scholarship, including a commentary on Maimonides and the first translation of the Pentateuch into German for a Jewish audience; and his great plea for religious freedom, Jerusalem ( 1783 ). His works in aesthetics, produced early in his career, include the Letters on the Sensations ( 1755 ), “On the Chief Principles of the Fine Arts and Sciences” ( 1757 ), “On the Sublime and the Naive” ( 1758 ), and the “Rhapsody or Supplements to the Letters on the Sensations,” included in the first...

CHURCH, Alonzo

CHURCH, Alonzo (1793–1862)   Reference library

John R. Shook

Dictionary of Early American Philosophers

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...administration, and among his students there were several who became prominent southern leaders, including Alexander H. STEPHENS , the Vice President of the Confederacy. Church’s educational philosophy was strictly traditional and religiously conservative. He stridently protected the classical curriculum oriented around ancient languages, rhetoric and writing, and the Christian prescription of natural and moral theology. However, by the 1840 the curriculum had expanded to include some science, calculus, modern languages, and political economy. Church...

AGASSIZ, Jean Louis Rodolphe

AGASSIZ, Jean Louis Rodolphe (1807–1873)   Reference library

Nathan Houser

Dictionary of Early American Philosophers

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...pastor. Agassiz attended the College of Lusanne in France from 1822 to 1824 and decided to devote himself to the study of nature. He received training in biology and natural history at the University of Zurich from 1824 to 1826 , and at the University of Heidelberg in 1826–27 . In 1827 he received his MD from the University of Munich, and then went to the University of Erlangen for his PhD in zoology, which he received in 1829 . With assistance from the French naturalist Georges Cuvier and the German scholar Alexander von Humboldt, Agassiz began...

McGUFFEY, William Holmes

McGUFFEY, William Holmes (1800–1873)   Reference library

Caleb Puckett

Dictionary of Early American Philosophers

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Ohio. He accepted the position at the newly opened university, began teaching, and received his BA degree in ancient languages and philosophy by Washington College later that year. Never one to dismiss an opportunity to help educate others, the now twenty-six year old McGuffey decided to take his brother, Alexander , to Oxford with him so that the boy might receive a solid education at the grammar school affiliated with the university. In a little over a year, McGuffey found financial security, become a highly respected member of the university community,...

Aristotle

Aristotle (384–322bc)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
1,547 words

...moved to Asia Minor, where he spent some years devoted principally to the study of biology and zoology. In 343 he moved to Pella, where he served as tutor to King Philip's son, the future Alexander the Great . (What influence Aristotle may have had on that obnoxious young man is uncertain.) After further migrations, Aristotle returned to Athens in 335 , and for the next decade engaged in teaching and research in his own school in the Lyceum. He fled from Athens on the death of Alexander in 323 , and died a year later in Chalcis. His will, which has...

Longinus

Longinus   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
2,217 words

...the sublimity of artistic experience from the threats of atheism and scientism. It also seemed to offer classical authority against the mere elegance and “correctness” that many thought the disease of eighteenth-century art and literature. The first enthusiasts among European writers and artists for such examples of the natural sublime as the Alps and the Scottish Highlands are contemporary, or nearly, with Nicolas Boileau's immensely influential translation and commentary ( 1674 ). By 1728 , Longinus was so well known in literary England that Alexander...

CAREY, Mathew

CAREY, Mathew (1760–1839)   Reference library

Marc-William Palen

Dictionary of Early American Philosophers

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...published Vindiciae Hibernicae in 1819 , in defense of the Irish. The book was considered to have greatly vindicated the Irish cause. The year 1819 also marked Carey’s serious immersion into political economics. Upon retirement from his publishing firm in 1822 , Carey turned his focus in large part upon promoting American economic nationalism. Hoping to pick up on the issue where Alexander HAMILTON had left off, Carey’s pamphlets on the subject numbered in the hundreds. Carey was influenced greatly by his respect for England’s industrial power which...

Locke, John

Locke, John (1632–1704)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
524 words

...probably the strongest influence on him, and became his close friend, student, and unofficial assistant. He graduated as an MA in 1658 and was elected a Senior Student of Christ Church and then a lecturer in Greek. After a brief excursion into diplomacy in 1665–6 he returned to Oxford to study medicine and collaborated with the great physician Thomas Sydenham . In 1667 he left Oxford to become personal physician to Lord Ashley , later first earl of Shaftesbury, whose life he was credited with saving by an operation. He was elected Fellow of the Royal...

KENT, James

KENT, James (1763–1847)   Reference library

Brian E. Butler

Dictionary of Early American Philosophers

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...as the first holder of a professorship of law at Columbia College in New York City, a position he received in large part due to the influence of John JAY and Alexander HAMILTON . After a promising start in the classroom, his lectures proved to be poorly attended. He held this professorship of law until 1798 . Kent resumed his career in public law in 1796 , when he was made New York Master in Chancery by John Jay . Soon after, and concurrently with his Chancery appointment, he became Recorder of the City of New York. In 1798 he was appointed to the New...

Origen

Origen   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of African Thought

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Regional and National History, Philosophy
Length:
1,435 words

...the head of the school in 202, bringing to the leadership his great intellect as a scholar; he was also a respected exegete of scriptures. Allegorical interpretation of the Bible was used by theologians to search for deeper truths beyond the literal or explicitly stated. For example, Origen interpreted many of the passages in the Hebrew Bible as pointing to Christ. Scholars in Antioch opposed the allegorical interpretation because they argued that historical context of the text was important. Origen also considered literal interpretation, but emphasized the...

Dryden, John

Dryden, John (1631)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
1,812 words

...tended to use the occasion to make social and political commentary. Alexander's Feast ( 1697 ), for instance, supposedly an ode to music, is also a variation on the theme of the artist's power, for it depicts the poet-orator-musician Timotheus manipulating the usurping monarch, Alexander the Great, in ways Dryden liked to think he was managing his own monarch, the usurping William III. Similarly, Dryden claims that he offers his translation of the Aeneis ( 1697 ) as “good Counsel” to his king, following Virgil, who, in directing his epic to the emperor...

Cooper, Myles

Cooper, Myles (1737–1785)   Reference library

Derek C. Hatch

Dictionary of Early American Philosophers

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...of the English throne. The response was penned by Alexander HAMILTON , then an eighteen-year-old student at King’s College. Cooper’s views and the impassioned retorts by his interlocutors escalated the tensions between Cooper and the students, which increased to the point that a mob organized on 10 May 1775 to seize him. Cooper, half-dressed, escaped, reportedly with the aid of two students who held back the mob (one of whom was Hamilton), and sought refuge in a friend’s house until he found a more permanent hiding place within a British warship in the...

View: