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Alexander the Great

[Na] Leader of the Macedonians. Born in 356 bc, Alexander was tutored in his early years by Aristotle before succeeding his father Philip as king of Macedonia and the mainland of ...

Seleucids

Seleucids  

A member of a dynasty ruling over Syria and a great part of western Asia from 311 to 65 bc. Its capital was at Antioch. The name comes from Seleucus Nicator (the founder, one of Alexander the Great's ...
Roger Bacon

Roger Bacon  

(c.1214–92)English philosopher and scientist, known as Doctor Mirabilis (‘marvellous doctor’). A member of the Franciscan order, Bacon began his career studying the previously forbidden works of ...
Hellenism

Hellenism  

Of or relating to Greek history, language, and culture from the death of Alexander the Great to the defeat of Cleopatra and Mark Antony by Octavian in 31 bc. During this period Greek culture ...
Egypt

Egypt  

Pre‐PtolemaicDuring the New Kingdom (Dynasties 18–20, c.1575–1087bc) Egypt expanded into Asia. This great age of Egyptian militarism created in the 18th Dynasty an empire which stretched from the ...
love

love  

Love me little, love me long love of great intensity is unlikely to last; proverbial saying, early 16th century.love me, love my dog proverbial saying, early 16th century; St Bernard in a sermon says ...
York

York  

A Roman legionary fortress, colonia, and provincial capital, Eboracum was founded in the early 70s ad as a fortress for legio IX Hispana. After the withdrawal of IX Hispana, its place was taken by ...
psalter

psalter  

A manuscript (particularly one for liturgical use) or a printed book containing the text of the Psalms. It was the most popular type of illuminated book from the 11th to the 14th century. Thereafter ...
dialogue

dialogue  

1 Vocal work, mainly from medieval times to 17th cent., in which echo, alternation, or contrast suggested spoken dialogue.2 Spoken dialogue is used in some types of opera, e.g. Fr. opéra‐comique, ...
Smyrna

Smyrna  

A city of Roman Asia, now Izmir, on the W. coast of Turkey. The Christian community was one of the ‘Seven Churches’ addressed in Rev. (2: 8–11); it was warned of coming persecution. St Polycarp was ...
Alexandria

Alexandria  

The chief port and second‐largest city of Egypt, on the Mediterranean coast, northwest of Cairo. Founded in 332 bc by Alexander the Great, after whom it is named, it became a major centre of ...
elephants

elephants  

The elephant is the largest living land animal, and is taken as a type of something of great size and weight. The Indian elephant was traditionally used as a beast of burden and in the ancient world ...
St Thomas Aquinas

St Thomas Aquinas  

(1225–74)Italian philosopher, theologian, and Dominican friar. Regarded as the greatest figure of scholasticism, he also devised the official Roman Catholic tenets as declared by Pope Leo XIII. His ...
William Laud

William Laud  

(1573–1645)English prelate. In 1633 he was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury and set about the suppression of the prevailing Calvinism in England and Presbyterianism in Scotland. His moves to impose ...
sublime

sublime  

C18 aesthetic category associated with ideas of awe, intensity ruggedness, terror, and vastness emphasizing Man's relative insignificance in the face of Nature, arousing emotions, and stimulating the ...
Cleopatra

Cleopatra  

(69–30bc),queen of Egypt from 47 bc, the last Ptolemaic ruler. After a brief liaison with Julius Caesar she formed a political and romantic alliance with Mark Antony. Their ambitions ultimately ...
gems

gems  

Minerals (usually of crystallized matter) used for decorating items such as textiles and liturgical objects or for personal adornment. The most highly prized are the precious stones, diamonds, ...
Averroës

Averroës  

(c. 1126–98),Spanish-born Islamic philosopher, judge, and physician. His extensive body of work includes writings on jurisprudence, science, philosophy, and religion. His highly influential ...
nomads

nomads  

[Ge]Herding societies whose seasonal movements are primarily dependent on the search for fresh pastures, although exceptionally they may also be involved with limited cultivation.
USA, film in the

USA, film in the   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Film Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
938 words

...coterminous with Hollywood ( see hollywood ). In parallel with the generally mainstream fare produced in Hollywood, US filmmakers have made a wide range of films. In the 1920s and 1930s, avant-garde filmmakers Charles Sheeler , Paul Strand , Slavko Vorkapić , and Robert Florey produced experimental films; and in the 1940s, Maya Deren and Alexander Hammid's Meshes of the Afternoon ( 1943 ) garnered international critical acclaim ( see avant-garde film ). In the 1960s, a distinct movement of avant-garde filmmakers based in New York, including Bruce...

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