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Alexander the Great

[Na] Leader of the Macedonians. Born in 356 bc, Alexander was tutored in his early years by Aristotle before succeeding his father Philip as king of Macedonia and the mainland of ...

Renault, Mary

Renault, Mary (1905–83)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Literature in English

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...) conjure up the politicians, philosophers, dramatists, and poets of ancient Athens. Fire from Heaven ( 1970 ), The Persian Boy ( 1972 ), and Funeral Games ( 1981 ) together make up her most cohesive work, recreating the life and death of Alexander the Great, who was also the subject of her biography, The Nature of Alexander ( 1975...

Wood-Seys, R. A.

Wood-Seys, R. A. (1854–1919)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Edwardian Fiction

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2005

...A. [ Roland Alexander Wood-Seys ] ( 1854–1919 ). Born at Stourbridge, Worcestershire, Wood-Seys travelled widely from 1876 . He worked in London 1884–96 as a reviewer and publisher's reader. In 1897 he settled in California and grew olives. He wrote nine novels as ‘Paul Cushing’ from 1885 , of which the last is God's Lad: A Novel ( 1900 ) in which the English hero and heroine separately make their fortunes in America; it ends in California. Under his own name he published The Honourable Derek: A Novel ( 1910 ) and The Device of the Black Fox (...

Conquest, Robert

Conquest, Robert (1917– )   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Literature in English

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...novel The Egyptologists ( 1965 ). His many publications on the USSR include The Great Terror ( 1973 ) and The Harvest of Sorrow ( 1986 ), which examine the effects of Stalin's policies in the 1930s. His translation of Alexander Solzhenitsyn's Prussian Nights appeared in 1973...

Gift, The

Gift, The   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Literature in English

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...Godunov-Cherdyntsev over three years of his life in Berlin in the 1920s. Each of the five long chapters enlarges the narrator's story while at the same time exploring what are, for Nabokov, important aspects of the Russian cultural and literary tradition. The second chapter is famous for its interweaving of details of the life of Fyodor's father with a biographical and critical account of the works of Alexander Pushkin. The fourth chapter, deleted from the first French edition, concerns the nineteenth-century social critic Nikolai Chernyshevsky and is...

Gerhardie, William

Gerhardie, William (1895–1977)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Literature in English

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...the mood of the 1920s and is remarkable for the informal, conversational manner with which great recent events—the Russian Revolution and its aftermath—are presented. Gerhardie led a very social life, with many love affairs, and enjoyed the friendship of Wells and Beaverbrook . His second novel, The Polyglots ( 1925 ), concerns George Hamlet Alexander Diabologh, a young officer who, on a military mission in the Far East, encounters a highly eccentric Belgian family. The novel has a Chekhovian mingling of comedy and tragedy, of the inconsequential and the...

Eastman, Charles

Eastman, Charles (1858–1939)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Literature in English

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...Charles ( Charles Alexander Ohiyesa Eastman ) ( 1858–1939 ), Native American writer , born in Minesota of mixed Sioux Indian and white parentage, educated at Dartmouth and Boston University Medical School. Eastman was one of the first Native American writers to achieve a mass popular audience through his magazine accounts of Indian life and customs, and volumes such as Red Hunters and the Animal People ( 1904 ) and Old Indian Days ( 1907 ). He has also inspired other Sioux to write, such as Luther Standing Bear . Wigwam Evenings ( 1909 ;...

Boldrewood, Rolf

Boldrewood, Rolf (1826–1915)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Edwardian Fiction

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Current Version:
2005

...in the morning before the day's work began. Of his best-known work, he told a friend ‘I am also writing a rather sensational novel in the Sydney Mail called “Robbery Under Arms”. A man with eight children and a limited income must do all he can to supplement the income.’ It was published serially 1882–3 and in England in 1888 with great success. Browne used his pseudonym for a series of novels and stories that reflected his experiences as a squatter and magistrate in the Australian gold-fields. His later works include The Ghost Camp ( 1902 ) and The...

Carrel, Frederic

Carrel, Frederic (1869–1928)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Edwardian Fiction

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Current Version:
2005

...not offer this book as a novel in the ordinary sense of the word, but as a story … dealing with the broader instincts of life from an ethical standpoint, in harmony with the scientific spirit.’ The novel is in stilted dialogue and concerns the struggle between worldly selfinterest, personified by Agnes Alexander , and humanitarianism, personified by her sister Clara Maxwell , who enquires at one point, ‘Do you not think that we have a sense which makes us suffer when we contemplate an act which is against the welfare of the greater number?’ Agnes has married...

Maccaig, Norman

Maccaig, Norman (1910–96)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Literature in English

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...Norman ( Norman Alexander Maccaig ) ( 1910–96 ), Scottish poet , born in Edinburgh, where he was educated at the Royal High School and the University. He was a schoolteacher and latterly a headmaster from 1937 to 1970 , when he became a reader at the University of Stirling. During the 1940s MacCaig was associated with the New Apocalypse and his early work, collected in Far Cry ( 1943 ) and The Inward Eye ( 1946 ), partook of the movement's wildly energetic romanticism. A new fluency and discipline emerge as stylistic characteristics in Riding...

Rattigan, Sir Terence

Rattigan, Sir Terence (1911–77)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Literature in English

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...the son of a diplomat, educated at Trinity College, Oxford. From the age of 25 he was one of England's commercially most successful play-wrights. French without Tears ( 1936 ), a comedy set in a language school, was followed by plays both serious and humorous: among them, Flare Path ( 1942 ), a tribute to the RAF at war; The Winslow Boy ( 1946 ), about a father's battle to clear his naval-cadet son of allegations of theft; The Browning Version ( 1948 ), a sympathetic study of an unpopular schoolmaster; dramatic biographies of (respectively) Alexander...

Page, Gertrude

Page, Gertrude (1873–1922)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Edwardian Fiction

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2005

...Philosophy, or, The Dam Farm ( 1910 ) and The Rhodesian ( 1912 ), and some in England, like The Great Splendour ( 1912 ) and The Pathway ( 1914 ). Paddy-the-Next-Best-Thing ( 1908 ) is a ‘wild Irish girl’ novel (Page's husband was from Armagh), in the vein of Mrs George de Horne Vaizey 's Pixie O'Shaughnessy ( 1903 ): the heroine's father describes her as the next best thing to a boy, and she herself becomes the next best thing to a national hero, namely, the mother of one. During the First World War the Dobbins came to England and lectured on...

Biography;

Biography;   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Literature in English

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...to his subject's character and habits in The Life of Samuel Johnson ( 1791 ), which bears out his preface's claim that ‘I profess to write not his panegyrick, … but his life’. Throughout the Victorian era, however, biography was largely given over to memorializing the great and good as examples of the link between virtue and achievement, an ethos culminating in the foundation of the Dictionary of National Biography in 1882 . Reaction against the conventions of nineteenth-century biography came in the form of Lytton Strachey 's iconoclastic accounts...

Wells, H. G.

Wells, H. G. (1866–1946)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Literature in English

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..., 1934 , and his short fable The Croquet Player , 1936 , are exceptions to this.) He collaborated with Alexander Korda to produce the epic future-war movie Things to Come ( 1936 ). He stayed in London throughout the Second World War, and died there shortly after the founding of the United Nations and the onset of the nuclear age at Hiroshima—two events which sum up Wells's hopes and fears for humanity. See H. G. Wells: Desperately Mortal ( 1986 ), by David C. Smith , H. G. Wells ( 1987 ), by Michael Draper , The History of Mr. Wells ( 1995 ),...

Sir James Murray

Sir James Murray  

(1837–1915),acquired his great philological and anti‐quarian knowledge largely through his own studies. He made the acquaintance of many scholars with similar preoccupations, including Skeat, Sweet, ...

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