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7-20-8

(1907), a “comedy of to‐day” by Augustin Daly. [Daly's Theatre, 49 perf.] Portrait of a Lady, picture #728 at the annual Academy exhibition, so lovingly depicts a beautiful woman ...

aspect ratio

aspect ratio  

Of a fin or wing, the ratio of length to width. A high-aspect-ratio fin or wing tends to be long and thin, producing a high lift- or thrust-to-drag ratio.
academies

academies  

Are societies or institutions for the cultivation and promotion of literature, the arts or science, or of some particular branch of science such as medicine, for example, the Académie de ...
abortion

abortion  

There is no actual prohibition in the Bible against aborting a foetus. Nevertheless, in the unanimously accepted Jewish consensus, abortion is a very serious offence, though foeticide is not treated ...
Darwinism

Darwinism  

The theory of evolution by natural selection, often used incorrectly as a synonym for the theory of evolution itself. The term ‘neo-Darwinism’ is often used to denote the ‘new synthesis’ (i.e. ...
television

television  

1. An electronic technology enabling the encoding and decoding of ‘moving images’ and synchronized sounds, together with their unidirectional, instantaneous, long-distance transmission and reception ...
Charles Darwin

Charles Darwin  

(1809–82)British naturalist, who studied medicine in Edinburgh followed by theology at Cambridge University, intending a career in the Church. However, his interest in natural history led him to ...
suicide

suicide  

The act of intentionally ending one's own life. A suicide pact is an agreement between two (or more) people to commit suicide together. See also euthanasia.
Sterope

Sterope (1)   Reference library

Herbert Jennings Rose

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
76 words

... (1) or Asterope , one of the Pleiads ( see pleiad ), wife of Oenomaus (Paus. 5. 10. 6); (2) daughter of Cepheus king of Tegea (Apollod. 2. 144). Heracles gave her (in Paus. 8. 47. 5, Athena gave Cepheus) some of the hair of Medusa ( see gorgo ), bidding her lift it three times above the city wall, to put attackers to flight. LIMC 7. 1 (1994), 809–20. Herbert Jennings...

Cacus

Cacus   Reference library

C. Robert Phillips

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
239 words

... 8. 190–279 ; Livy 1. 7. 3–15, with Ogilvie's notes; Prop. 4. 9; Ov. Fast. 1. 543–86, with Bömer's notes, 5. 643–52) a savage fire-breathing monster whose thieving terrified the locals on the Palatine ( Aventine according to Virgil; but the Scalae Caci on the Palatine imply otherwise: P. Pensabene , LTUR 4.239–40, ‘Scalae Caci’); he stole some of Geryon's cattle from Heracles /Hercules, who killed him. This Hellenized version relied on Heracles traditions (cf. Hdt. 4. 8) and a false etymology from the Greek kakos (evil: Servius on Aen. 8....

Mētragyrtēs

Mētragyrtēs   Reference library

Francis Redding Walton and David S. Potter

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
156 words

...bc Athens (Arist. Rh. 1405 a 20), and Cicero (Leg . 2. 22, 40; cf. Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 2. 19) implies that these famuli were tolerated at Rome. They were generally eunuchs , the Galli. Similar agyrtai (‘beggars’) existed in other cults (Pl. Resp. 364b ), chiefly oriental, and Apuleius ( Met. 8–9 ) gives a lively picture of those of the Dea Syria ( see Atargatis ). An inscription from Syria ( BCH 1897, 59, no. 68) records the collections made on his travels by one such slave (δοῦλος) of Atargatis (cf. SEG 7. 358, 801). H. Graillot , Le...

Licinius (RE 112) Macer, Gaius

Licinius (RE 112) Macer, Gaius   Reference library

Alexander Hugh McDonald and Antony J. S. Spawforth

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
167 words

...books, began with the origins; Pyrrhus appeared in book 2; its closing-point is unknown. It reflected democratic and family bias (Livy 7. 9. 5) and was rhetorically composed. At the same time, it rationalized legends and quoted original authorities, particularly the ‘linen books’, libri lintei (Livy 4. 7. 12, 4. 20. 8, 4. 23. 2), in order to reinterpret the old political institutions. Livy and Dionysius (7) of Halicarnassus used his work. See historiography, roman . E. Rawson , Intellectual Life in the Late Roman Republic (1985), 219 f.; S....

damnatio memoriae

damnatio memoriae   Reference library

John Percy Vyvian Dacre Balsdon and Barbara M. Levick

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
177 words

... Ulp. Dig. 24. 1. 32. 7) but a repertoire ( Tac. Ann. 3. 17. 8–18. 1): images might be destroyed ( Sejanus ; Valeria Messal(l)ina ), and their display penalized ( L. Appuleius Saturninus , 98 bc ), the name erased from inscriptions, and a man's praenomen banned in his family ( Livy 6. 20. 14; 384 bc !). With emperors their acts were abolished. Claudius prevented the senate from condemning Gaius (1) ( Cass. Dio 60. 4. 5); but decrees were passed against Domitian ( Suet. Dom. 23 ), Commodus ( SHA Comm . 20 ), and Elagabalus ( SHA ...

Telesilla

Telesilla   Reference library

Christopher Carey

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
179 words

..., Argive poet ( see argos (1) ) of the 5th cent. bc . Later tradition (probably of Argive origin, since her statue at Argos showed her putting on a helmet: Paus. 2. 20. 7) credited her with arming the women of Argos after its defeat by Cleomenes (1) I (Paus. 2. 20. 8; Plut. Mor. 245c–f). Herodotus (1) 6. 76 ff. does not mention her, and it has been suggested that the incident is a fabrication based on the oracle cited there. Nine fragments survive, possibly from hymns . Her songs, written in the choral lyric dialect, were composed for...

Polemon (1) (RE 3) I

Polemon (1) (RE 3) I   Reference library

Christopher Brendan Reginald Pelling

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
192 words

...In 15 / 14 he was awarded the turbulent Bosporan kingdom ( see bosporus (2) ); Agrippa helped him to occupy it, but local opposition was bitter, and he was eventually captured and killed in 8/7. His widow Pythodoris succeeded him in Pontus. H. Buchheim , Die Orientpolitik des Triumvirn M. Antonius (1960); R. D. Sullivan , ANRW 2. 7. 2 (1980), 915–20; G. W. Bowersock , Augustus and the Greek World (1965), see index. Christopher Brendan Reginald...

Nortia

Nortia   Reference library

Jerzy Linderski

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
165 words

...affixed; Livy 7. 3. 7 compares the old Roman custom of the praetor maximus affixing on the Ides of September a nail in Jupiter's temple, and interprets these yearly nails ( clavi annales ) as markers of years (cf. Festus, Gloss. Lat. 161 ). They could serve that purpose, but the goal of the rite (as with Mesopotamian and Hittite parallels) was rather to fix the fates for the coming year. Nortia was identified with Fortuna (schol. Juv. 10. 74) and Nemesis (Martianus Capella, 1. 88). Necessitas (Hor. Carm. 1. 35. 17–20, 3. 24. 5–8) and the Etruscan...

Carmentis

Carmentis   Reference library

C. Robert Phillips

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
311 words

... ( 1938–54 ), s.v. ‘carmen’; Ogilvie, Comm. Livy 1–5 1. 7. 8, and, for other etymologies, Ov. Fast. 1. 619–20, Plut. Quaest. Rom. 56. Connected with childbirth (cf. the two Carmentes, Prorsa and Postverta, in reference to the child's position in the womb: Varro, Antiquitates Romanae Divinae frs. 103–4 Cardauns, with his comments), prophecy (Serv. on Aen. 8. 51), or both ( fasti Praenestini , 11 January), although the prohibition on leather (Ov. Fast. 1. 629; cf. Varro, Ling. 7. 84) implies childbirth. Mythologically a prophetess, mother of...

Columella

Columella   Quick reference

M. Stephen Spurr

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
379 words

...by the owner (1. 1. 18–20), and the integration of arable and animal husbandry (6 praef. 1–2)—against influential contrary views on agricultural management (1 praef. 1). His calculation of the profits of viticulture (3. 3. 8–15) has aroused lively modern debate. But that Columella treats vines at greater length than cereals reflects the complexity of viticulture not the supposed demise of Italian arable cultivation. He owned several estates near Rome (2. 3. 3; 3. 9. 2) but had firsthand knowledge of agriculture elsewhere in Italy (cf. 7. 2. 3) and in the...

Turnus

Turnus (2)   Reference library

Mario Citroni

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
152 words

... (2) , satirist of the time of Domitian , popular in his own time (Mart. 7. 97. 8) and frequently mentioned later (Rut. Namat. 1. 603–4; Sid. Apoll. Carm. 9. 266; Lydus , Mag. 1. 41). The brother of the tragedian Scaevus Memor (Mart. 11. 10), according to a scholion ( see scholia ) by Valerius Probus , quoted by George Valla in his 1486 commentary on Juvenal 1. 20, he was of freedman birth but attained great fame at court. Martial praises his vigour. A fragment on Locusta , a notorious poisoner at the court of Nero , suggests he dealt...

commendatio

commendatio   Reference library

John Percy Vyvian Dacre Balsdon and Barbara M. Levick

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
182 words

...was infirm ( Cass. Dio 55. 34. 20, ad 8 ), or absent (e.g. Tiberius , ad 26 onwards). Such candidati Caesaris were normally sure of success; that made Tiberius careful to limit their numbers and delicate in his handling of the consulship (Tac. Ann. 1. 15. 1; 1. 81). However, Vespasian , in order to give his candidates a better chance, had to have them voted on separately ( ILS 244 = E J 364 ). Any pretence that imperial influence was not decisive disappeared by the end of the 1st cent. ( Pliny (2) , Pan. 77. 7). B. Levick , Hist. 1967, 207...

Lycus

Lycus (1)   Reference library

Emily Kearns

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
149 words

... (3) (1. 19. 3, 4. 1. 8–9) connects him with the cult of Apollo Lycius, and with the mysteries of Andania in Messenia. It is not clear whether this figure was identified with the Lycus whose shrine was situated near a lawcourt and who appears as a sort of patron of jurors in Aristophanes (1) , Vesp. 389–94. A Theban Lycus ( see thebes (1) ) was husband of Dirce , who with her mistreated Antiope and was killed by her children Amphion and Zethus . G. Berger-Doer , LIMC 6. 302–7; A. L. Boegehold , Hesp. 1967 (111–20). Emily...

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