You are looking at 1-20 of 79 entries  for:

  • Cookery, Food, and Drink x
  • Regional and Area Studies x
clear all

View:

Overview

20/20

Subject: Music

This US group was formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1978 by Steve Allen (guitar, vocals) and Ron Flynt (bass, vocals), two expatriate musicians from Tulsa, Oklahoma. Drummer Mike Gallo ...

National Food Days

National Food Days   Reference library

Kimberly Lord Stewart

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Congress Busy with Resolutions.” Media General News Service , November 26, 2008. http://www.mgwashington.com/index.php/news/article/from-watermelons-to-mr.-wizard-congress-busy-with-resolutions/2194/ . Library of Congress . http://www.loc.gov/search/?q=National%20Food%20Days%20&fa=digitized:%20true . McGuire, Holly , and Keil, Kathryn , eds. Chase's Calendar of Events , p. 6. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2011. Rottinghaus, Brandon . “The Power to Proclaim.” The American Presidency Project. ...

Soup Kitchens

Soup Kitchens   Reference library

Karen Karp

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...mid-1900s, welfare capitalism was popular, but the Great Depression, which started at the end of the 1920s, had proved that business could not solve the problems of poverty, including hunger alleviation. Local governments tried to help the needy, but expenditures, which averaged $8.20 per month per person, did nothing to help the thousands more who required federal aid. Thus, following the stock market crash of 1929 , organizations like the Red Cross and Salvation Army provided help through soup kitchens and breadlines: 13 million people—25 percent of the...

Food Pyramids

Food Pyramids   Reference library

Andrew F. Smith

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...They focus on “consuming fewer calories, making informed food choices, and being physically active” to “attain and maintain a healthy weight, reduce their risk of chronic disease, and promote overall health.” The Guidelines note that “Currently, Americans consume less than 20 percent of the recommended intake for whole grains, less than 60 percent for vegetables, less than 50 percent for fruits, and less than 60 percent for milk and milk products. Inadequate intakes of nutrient-dense foods from these basic food groups place individuals at risk for lower...

Fondue Pot

Fondue Pot   Reference library

Sylvia Lovegren

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...gold and avocado green and finally to wildly patterned pots by artists such as Peter Max. In the 1970s fondue pots were a popular wedding gift. Out of fashion for twenty years, fondue and its pots made a comeback in the late 1990s. Sales of Le Creuset brand cast-iron pots surged 20 percent, Williams-Sonoma reintroduced fondue pots in its holiday catalog, and West Bend added an extra large Entertainer pot to its line. [ See also Cheese ; Chocolate ; Pots and Pans .] bibliography Lovegren, Sylvia . Fashionable Food . New York: Macmillan, 1995. Rhule, Patty ....

Sorghum Flour

Sorghum Flour   Reference library

Cheryl Forberg

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...D. Waniska , and E. L. Suhendro . “ Characteristics of Breads Baked with Sorghum Brans High in Phenolic Compounds .” Paper presented at the Sorghum Industry Conference and Twenty-Second Biennial Grain Sorghum Research and Utilization Conference, Nashville, Tennessee, February 18–20, 2001. Cheryl...

Baking Powder

Baking Powder   Reference library

Linda Civitello

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...baking powder. In 1893 , Dr. Oetker brand baking powder, based on Rumford 's formula, began production in Germany. On 2 March 1899 , Royal was reincorporated in New Jersey as a trust and capitalized at the enormous sum—for that time—of $20 million. With a monopoly on cream of tartar baking powders, which were 20 percent of the market, Royal attempted to achieve a complete monopoly. It claimed that SAS baking powders were toxic and bribed the Missouri state legislature to outlaw them. SAS manufacturers countered that Royal baking powder was toxic and in...

Chickpeas

Chickpeas   Reference library

Josephine Bacon

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...chickpeas are added to stews, such as ropas viejas and cocido , and they are used similarly in Spain, India, and France. Common uses in the United States are in soups, vegetable combinations, or as a component of salads. The chickpea is highly nutritious—containing about 20 percent protein, 5 percent fat, and 55 percent carbohydrate, as well as malic and oxalic acid—and it has become a favorite among health-conscious Americans. [ See also Beans ; Hummus ; Middle Eastern Influences on American Food ; Peas ; Tahini .] Bibliography Grains, Pasta, and...

Community-Supported Agriculture

Community-Supported Agriculture   Reference library

Eve Jochnowitz

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Kanagawa prefecture in Japan when a group of two hundred homemakers organized to ask a local family farm about providing milk at reduced prices if they pledged to pay in advance. This cooperative grew into the Seikatsu Club, which by the late twentieth century connected more than 20 million Japanese consumers with local producers. In 1985 Robyn Van En , the owner of the Indian Line Farm in western Massachusetts, organized the first such collective in the United States and named the venture “community-supported agriculture.” By the early twenty first century,...

Jewish Dietary Laws

Jewish Dietary Laws   Reference library

Eve Jochnowitz

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...14:11–18; because the forbidden birds are scavengers and birds of prey, all such birds came to be regarded as unclean, and prohibited. Among land creatures, only ruminants, animals that split the hoof and chew the cud, are suitable (Leviticus 11:3–8 and 20–27 and Deuteronomy 14:4–8 and 19–20). Combination of Milk and Meat. A most important facet of the observance of kashruth, and the one that most distinguishes a kosher kitchen, is the separation of milk and meat products. This practice is traced to the three instances in the Pentateuch (Exodus 23:19,...

Archer Daniels Midland

Archer Daniels Midland   Reference library

Bruce Kraig

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Daniels Midland With 275 processing plants worldwide, 22,000 employees, and official sales of more than $20 billion at the end of the millennium, the Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) is one of the world's leading agribusinesses. Headquartered in Decatur, Illinois, the self-styled “Supermarket to the World” processes soybeans, wheat, corn, peanuts, rice, barley, and various oil seeds and converts cocoa into “value-added products” for human and animal consumption. The company is also a world leader in nutraceuticals (vitamins E and C, choline, soy...

A&W Root Beer Stands

A&W Root Beer Stands   Reference library

Andrew F. Smith

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Root Beer Stands On 20 June 1919 , Roy Allen opened a root beer stand in Lodi, California, brewing the beverage from a recipe he had bought from an Arizona pharmacist. Allen's gimmick was to freeze the glass mugs so that the root beer would stay icy cold to the last drop. He offered these “frosty mugs” of his home‑brewed special root beer for a nickel. Things went well, and Allen soon opened more stands in Stockton and Sacramento; one of these outlets was a drive‑in—a novel concept in those early years of the automobile age. “Tray‑boys” and “tray‑girls”...

Food Trucks

Food Trucks   Reference library

Sophia V. Schweitzer

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Trendy food trucks have caught on with traditional chain food restaurants as well; they are used for test marketing, and some food trucks have multiplied under a single brand. A few are settling down in actual buildings. Reports exist that the number of trucks has been increasing 20 percent each year since 2006 in some cities, but giving hard facts about America's food trucks is impossible. They come and go, and schedules change daily. In the fall of 2010 , Los Angeles County alone counted 9,500 food trucks and carts. The unprecedented popularity of food...

High-Fructose Corn Syrup

High-Fructose Corn Syrup   Reference library

Andrew F. Smith

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...although some research has suggested that it may be as high as 65 percent fructose. HFCS has increasingly replaced other forms of sugar in the U.S. food supply. By 1993 Americans were consuming 79 pounds of HFCS annually per capita, and by 2004 , 175 pounds per person, about 20 percent of it in sodas. Since 1973 , consumption of HFCS has soared 4,000 percent, and approximately 55 percent of the sweeteners consumed by Americans is now HFCS. Americans consume on average 62 pounds of HFCS per year, and critics have worried about its potential deleterious...

Tolbert, Frank X.

Tolbert, Frank X. (1912–1984)   Reference library

Mark H. Zanger

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...agreed that he would declare himself disabled by the heat of the stew, and thus the event would have to be repeated the next year. The forty-fifth annual Terlingua International Frank X. Tolbert–Wick Fowler Championship Chili Cookoff was held in 2011 , with winners ranked 1 to 20 in the chili category, and nine other competitions for Texas foods. Tolbert issued a revised and expanded edition of A Bowl of Red in 1972 , and the Tolbert family opened a chili restaurant in Dallas, which was revived in 2006 by his daughter. [ See also Chili ; Journalism ;...

Salt Controversies

Salt Controversies   Reference library

Andrew F. Smith

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...sodium sources in their products. Heinz lowered the amount of salt in its ketchup, and Campbell's cut the sodium in 110 products, with plans to double this number. Hormel Foods, makers of SPAM, cut 560,000 pounds of salt from their products in 2007 . Taco Bell reduced sodium by 20 percent during the period from 2008 to 2010 . KFC has reported removing a million pounds of salt from its menu each year. Reducing the sodium content of processed foods while maintaining their familiar qualities is not easy. In addition to affecting food's flavor and nutritional...

Amusement Parks

Amusement Parks   Reference library

Jim Futrell

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...there are approximately six hundred parks in the United States attracting over 300 million visitors, who spend approximately $11 billion annually. Food accounts for approximately one-fourth of park revenues, and approximately 80 percent of a park's food revenue typically comes from 20 percent of the products. On average, parks tend to have between fifteen and twenty food outlets. Amusement parks have continued to add new items to reflect changing customer habits. Ethnic items such as nachos, pizza, and egg rolls can be found in many amusement parks, along with...

Budweiser

Budweiser   Reference library

David Gerard Hogan and Andrew F. Smith

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...to the introduction twelve years later of additional Budweiser spin-offs, Bud Ice and Bud Ice Light. This expanded Budweiser family extended the beer market even further; by 2002 , the company was producing more than 100 million barrels per year, collectively accounting for over 20 percent of all beer sold in the United States. The brand continues to become more and more ingrained in American culture, its Clydesdales a traditional feature of many community events and its Super Bowl advertising an annual event in itself. In 2008 , Anheuser Busch was...

Orange Juice

Orange Juice   Reference library

Andrew F. Smith, Joseph M. Carlin, and Andrew F. Smith

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...(removing much of the water) before freezing improved the taste. After World War II frozen foods became big business: Grocers devoted more space to freezers, and appliance makers enlarged the freezer compartments of home refrigerators. By the early 1950s orange juice accounted for 20 percent of the frozen food market. Orange juice is used as an ingredient in several drinks, including the Orange Julius, the screwdriver (vodka and orange juice), the mimosa (champagne and orange juice), the orange blossom (gin and orange juice), and the tequila sunrise (tequila,...

Sausage

Sausage   Reference library

Kantha Shelke

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...soy sausages. Sausages are usually bought already prepared. Although specialty sausages, such as andouille, blood sausage, bockbier sausage, bratwurst, chorizo, head cheese, kielbasa, knockwurst, and mortadella, are available in the United States, Americans have consumed more than 20 billion hot dogs in recent years. Alternating between decadent and healthful foods, Americans consume sausages as part of meals and as snacks and have even created a similar product, called “Snausages,” for their dogs. The sausage in one form or another is a staple in the average...

Sugar Beets

Sugar Beets   Reference library

Cathy K. Kaufman

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...in excess of $1 billion annually. Significantly, Utah has had no sugar beet industry since the 1980s, although in 2002 , its state legislature named the sugar beet Utah's “historic state vegetable.” The concentrated sweetness of the sugar beet (a good harvest can reach up to 20 percent sugar) prevented its acceptance as a table vegetable in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries: Amelia Simmons 's American Cookery ( 1796 ) critiqued the “white” beet that “has a sickish sweetness, which is disliked by many.” More recently, it is grown as a specialty...

View: