You are looking at 1-20 of 196 entries  for:

  • Cookery, Food, and Drink x
  • Science and technology x
clear all

View:

Overview

20/20

Subject: Music

This US group was formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1978 by Steve Allen (guitar, vocals) and Ron Flynt (bass, vocals), two expatriate musicians from Tulsa, Oklahoma. Drummer Mike Gallo ...

vincotto

vincotto   Quick reference

The Diner’s Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...An Italian condiment made by boiling down unfermented grape must until it has reduced to 20 per cent of its original volume, producing a thick dark sweet liquid that can be sprinkled over savoury and sweet dishes. It originated in Apulia in southeastern Italy. Its name means literally ‘cooked...

manzanilla

manzanilla   Quick reference

The Diner’s Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...A type of fino sherry made at Sanlucar de Barrameda, about 20 kilometres northeast of Jerez. Sanlucar is near the sea, on the estuary of the River Guadalquivir, and it is said that the sea breezes are responsible for the distinctive salty bitter tang of manzanilla. In Spanish manzanilla means literally ‘camomile’; it is a diminutive form of manzana ‘apple’ (camomile has apple-scented leaves). A manzanilla that is aged sufficiently long in cask to acquire a deeper colour and a nuttier taste is known as a manzanilla pasada...

Slippery elm

Slippery elm   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...The plant is native to eastern Canada and eastern and central USA. It is most common in the Appalachian mountains. Other species are also used, e.g. white elm ( Ulmus americana ). Plant description Slippery elm is a large tree growing to a height of 20 m (65 ft). Its obovate hairy leaves are up to 20 cm (8 in) in length. The small reddish flowers give rise to winged fruits. Herbal medicine is made from the inner bark of the trunk and branches of the tree. Culinary and nutritional value It has been suggested that slippery elm is not suitable as a...

Uva-ursi, bearberry

Uva-ursi, bearberry   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...uva-ursi Family Ericaceae Origin and cultivation Although originating in Europe, the plant is now found throughout the Northern Hemisphere. It grows in heathland and grassland. The major producing country is Spain. Plant description Uva-ursi is a low growing, up to 50 cm (20 in) in height, evergreen shrub with obovate leaves and pink flowers that give rise to red berries. Herbal medicine is made from the leaves. Culinary and nutritional value None. Claims and folklore It is said to have astringent, diuretic, and urinary antiseptic properties. The drug...

Wild yam, colic root

Wild yam, colic root   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...yam, colic root Dioscorea villosa Family Dioscoreaceae Origin and cultivation Wild yam is found in the woods and thickets of the USA. Plant description It is a climber that may grow to a height of 5–6 m (20 ft). There is an underground slender rhizome and the heart-shaped leaves are up to 10 cm (4 in) in length. Its minute flowers are green–yellow in colour. The closely related Dioscorea quaternata is difficult to distinguish from D. villosa. The rhizome and roots are the sources of the herbal drug. Culinary and nutritional value None. Claims and...

Californian poppy

Californian poppy   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...poppy is native to western North America and grows wild in the coastal areas of south-west North America. It is frequently cultivated as a garden plant and is the state flower of California. Plant description The plant is an annual or short-lived perennial growing to a height of 20–60 cm (24 in), with finely divided blue–green leaves and orange, yellow, pink, or red flowers. The aerial parts have been used in herbal medicine. Culinary or nutritional value None. Claims and folklore Californian poppy contains alkaloids and glycosides (flavone) and is mildly...

Damiana

Damiana   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...and loss of balance. In most recent times it has been promoted as an aphrodisiac. Damiana has also been used as a tonic, laxative, and urinary antiseptic, and as an antidepressant. Evidence Among the chemical compounds identified in damiana are an essential oil (containing at least 20 components) responsible for the characteristic odour and taste, tannins, and glycosides. There is no experimental work to support the use of damiana as an aphrodisiac. Because of the presence of glycosides, care should be observed in using the drug, including in pregnancy and...

Hawthorn

Hawthorn   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...Family Rosaceae Origin and cultivation Hawthorn is found in woods, thickets, hedges, and other places throughout the temperate zones of the Northern Hemisphere. It is frequently cultivated. Plant description It is a thorny shrub or small tree growing to a height of about 5–6 m (20 ft). The leaves are lobed and obovate; the flowers are white, giving rise to red, egg-shaped fruits (haws). Chinese haw is C. pinnatifida. Extracts of fruits, leaves, and flowers are used in herbal medicine. Culinary and nutritional value Fruits have been candied and made into...

Helonias, false unicorn

Helonias, false unicorn   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...The plant was used by native North Americans, and then adopted by the settlers in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Plant description The plant is an herbaceous perennial growing to a height of 1 m (3 ft), with a basal rosette of obovate to spoon-shaped leaves, up to 20 cm (8 in) in length. Its flowering stem is erect, and bears small leaves and a dense raceme of tiny green–white flowers. Helonias plants are male or female. Its root is the source of the herbal drug. Culinary and nutritional value None. Claims and folklore Helonias has been used...

Fish oils

Fish oils   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...as part of a healthy lifestyle, helps maintain heart health. ’ Important caveats to the use of the claim are that it relates only to very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (of chain length 20 carbons or above) including EPA, and DHA, and not all long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as alpha-linolenic acid (which have chain lengths of less than 20). The ratio of EPA and DHA should reflect that which occurs naturally in oily fish' and include the statement that ‘ The Government advises that at least 2 servings of fish, one of which should be...

Sesame, beniseed, til

Sesame, beniseed, til   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...as a lubricant and illuminant. The oil is highly unsaturated (oleic and linoleic acids predominate), and rarely becomes rancid because of the presence of phenolic substances. In India it is used as a substitute for ‘ghee’, and in perfumery. The seed may contain up to 60% oil and 20–5% protein, and is a good source of calcium, phosphorus, iron, and B and E vitamins. There may be a little carotene. The fibre content is reasonable. Sesame seed is almost free of antinutritional factors but does contain oxalates in the seed coat, although this is not usually a...

Sunflower seed

Sunflower seed   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...roasted and salted and sold as snack food. Hulling provides kernels, which are consumed raw or roasted, and included in salads, candies, cakes, cookies, ice-cream toppings, and spreads. Sunflower seeds contain 27–40% polyunsaturated oil (a high percentage of linoleic acid) and 13–20% protein. In some cases, plant breeding has increased the amount of oil to 50%, and increased the percentage of monounsaturated oleic acid. Minerals present include sodium, potassium, calcium, and iron, and the vitamins found are carotene (a small amount), the B complex, and E....

Thuja, arbor-vitae

Thuja, arbor-vitae   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...It is cultivated as an ornamental in Europe. Thuja is a member of the gymnosperms; i.e. the seed is exposed, not enclosed in fruit as in the flowering plants (angiosperms). Thuja occidentalis has been used in Chinese medicine. Plant description The tree may grow to a height of 20 m (65 ft). Its bark is orange–brown, the leaves are scale-like, and the greenish yellow flowers give rise to cones that are brown when ripe, about 1 cm (⅜ in) in length. The leaves are used to prepare herbal medicine. Culinary and nutritional value Its essential oil may be used as...

Bilberry, whortleberry, huckleberry, winberry

Bilberry, whortleberry, huckleberry, winberry   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...acid, open woodlands. Because of its short stature, fruit collection is tedious and difficult, and therefore, it is not cultivated commercially but is often harvested locally. Its fruits, and to a lesser extent the leaves, are utilized. Plant description The plant is a low shrub, 20–60 cm (24 in) tall. It has green, angled twigs, bearing ovate and finely toothed leaves, 1–3 cm (1 in) long. The greenish pink flowers are solitary or in pairs. The fruits, about 6 mm in diameter, are pale red, ripening to blue–black in colour. Culinary and nutritional value The...

Dandelion

Dandelion   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...parts of the world. Forms, selected for large leaves to be used in salads, may well still be cultivated in gardens in France. Plant description It is a perennial, with a basal rosette of leaves dissected to varying degrees. The flower stalk, which may attain a height of 50 cm (20 in), carries a flower head 2–6 cm (2 in) across, consisting of strap-shaped yellow florets that give rise to the well known parachute-like fruits. There is a strong taproot. Culinary and nutritional value The young leaves, blanched or soaked in water to remove bitterness, are...

Deadly nightshade

Deadly nightshade   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...UK, China, and India. The plant grows on wasteland and wooded hills; it seems to flourish best on calcareous soils and in the shade. Plant description This perennial herb grows to a height of 1.0–1.5 m (5 ft), has fleshy roots, and an erect branched stem with ovate leaves up to 20 cm (8 in) long. The purple, bell-shaped flowers give rise to shiny black berries, about the size of small cherries. The parts used are the roots, leaves, and berries. Nutritional and Culinary value None. Claims and folklore The plant has a long usage in practice and folklore. It...

Devil's claw

Devil's claw   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...of the dried tuber to treat various ailments, e.g. rheumatism. The plant is now cultivated to some extent in southern Africa, for export of the dried tuber to Europe. Plant description H. procumbens is a trailing perennial up to 1.5 m (5 ft) in length, with tubers possibly 20 cm (8 in) long and 6 cm (2 in) thick, producing many aerial stems bearing round to ovate toothed or pinnately lobed leaves, about 7 cm (3 in) long, with white hairy undersides. The colourful flowers are up to 6 cm (2 in) long, solitary, red to purple, trumped shaped, and appear in...

Henna

Henna   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...Henna can be mixed with other dyes (possibly of plant origin) to give different shades. A lilac-scented oil obtained from the plant has been used in perfumery. Traditionally, it has been planted as a windbreak for vineyards. Plant description Henna grows to a height of about 6 m (20 ft), with oblong-shaped leaves up to 5 cm (2 in) in length. The small white to pink highly scented flowers are in clusters and give rise to blue–black capsules. Culinary and nutritional value None. Claims and folklore Henna has been used mainly in Ayurvedic medicine. It is said to...

Kava kava

Kava kava   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...have certain therapeutic qualities, e.g. that it acts as a diuretic, an analgesic, a urinary antiseptic, and a sedative. The best known modern use is for reducing nervous anxiety and tension. Evidence The rootstock contains various chemical substances, such as starch, sugars, and 3–20% kava lactones (resin), presumably the active principles. Clinical studies and experience, particularly in Germany, have led to the conclusion that kava kava products can be effective at dealing with mild states of anxiety, and are a reasonable alternative to synthetic...

Nutritional supplements

Nutritional supplements   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...and selected nutrients supplied by a 200 ml portion Energy (kcal) Protein (g) Fat (g) CHO a (g) Calcium (mg) Iron (mg) Vitamin B 12 (mg) Folate (μg) Vitamin C (mg) Vitamin D (μg) Build-up b 200 11.2 7.2 23.4 380 2.6 1.4 102 16 2.46 Complan b 290 13.8 11.2 33.8 500 3.0 1.6 84 20 1.02 Complan savoury 200 9.8 7.0 24.4 136 2.8 1.0 66 10 1.0 a CHO, carbohydrates. b Sweet powders made up with whole...

View: