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Subject: Music

This US group was formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1978 by Steve Allen (guitar, vocals) and Ron Flynt (bass, vocals), two expatriate musicians from Tulsa, Oklahoma. Drummer Mike Gallo ...

Sláinge

Sláinge   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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Current Version:
2004

..., Sláine . . Reputedly the first of the 142 kings of Tara , reigning in the 20th century bc . See SLÁINE (1)...

elephant statuettes

elephant statuettes   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

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2003

...statuettes . Ebony statuettes of elephants in graded sizes were popular mantlepiece ornaments in the first half of the 20th century; it was said they had to face the door of the room, otherwise the good luck they gave would turn to...

storks

storks   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

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2003

.... The whimsical idea that storks bring babies, universally known in 20th-century England, must have been adopted from northern Europe, where storks nesting on roofs are regarded as a sign of good luck and family...

hunchback

hunchback   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

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2003

.... For the first half of the 20th century, at least, it was considered lucky to touch the hump of a humpbacked person. The first known reference is in The People ( 11 June 1899 , quoted in N&Q 9s: 3 ( 1899 ), 486), but here it is implied that the belief is much older. Two other 20th-century references in Opie and Tatem make it clear that people disabled in this way could play on the superstition by charging money for the service at race-meetings and the like. Opie and Tatem , 1989:...

aonach

aonach   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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2004

..., aonaighe , áenach [ModIr., fair, assembly, meeting]. Category of celebration or fair such as those held on the first days of March, July, September, and December, at Millstreet, Co. Cork, about 20 miles W of Mallow Junction, in the early 20th century. The Old Irish equivalent, óenach, denotes medieval assemblies held periodically at Tara , Tailtiu , Tlachtga , and Uisnech , which included games and competitions rather than commerce. Distinguish from festival , féile , feis...

dwarves

dwarves   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

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2003

.... Traditional rural English speech rarely, if ever, uses the term ‘dwarf’ for a supernatural creature, even though in the 19th and 20th centuries it has become very familiar in literature as the preferred translation of various German, French, and Scandinavian words for sturdy gnome-like beings living underground or in...

Bolcáin, Glenn

Bolcáin, Glenn   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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2004

...of exiled madmen mentioned in several early Irish narratives, identified with Glenbuck, near Rasharkin, Co. Antrim. Suibne lives here in Buile Shuibhne [The Frenzy of Suibne]. See Gearoid S. MacEoin , ‘Gleann Bolcáinn agus Gleann na nGealt’, Béaloideas , 30 (1962 [1964]), 105–20...

Friday the thirteenth

Friday the thirteenth   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

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2003

... Friday , and a comparatively recent dislike of thirteen . The latter was first recorded at the end of the 17th century, in the limited context of people sitting at a meal; it became more common in the late 19th century, and especially in the 20th. The two ideas are not found in combination before the beginning of the 20th century, but the reputation of Friday the thirteenth is now thoroughly established, and constantly reinforced by the media. Opie and Tatem , 1989: 169, where the earliest record of the belief is from N&Q in 1913; Roud , 2003:...

spitting

spitting   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

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2003

...one unexpectedly found or given, or won in a bet; spitting on one's hands before fighting, or when embarking on a tough piece of work, was still done by schoolboys in the 1950s ( Radford, Radford, and Hole , 1961 : 318–20; Opie and Tatem, 1989 : 372–4). Children spit on seeing or doing anything reckoned unlucky (Opie and Opie, 1959 : 206–20). They lick a finger before making cross-my-heart or cut-my-throat gestures when swearing to the truth of something, often with the formula: My finger's wet, my finger's dry, Cut my throat if I tell a lie. Opie and ...

thunderstones

thunderstones   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

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2003

...thought to protect a house. In Sussex in the early 20th century fossil sea-urchins were set on the outside windowsills of kitchens and dairies to stop milk going sour, because thunder was believed to ‘turn’ milk; ammonites were used in the same way in Wiltshire and Gloucestershire in the 1860s, and it was noticed that mischievous village boys never interfered with them, simply because they were thunderbolts. Examples of all these objects could be found in London street markets in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, on sale under this name ( Lovett , ...

Wellerisms

Wellerisms   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

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2003

...the monkey said when he painted his tail sky-blue’; ‘You must draw the line somewhere, as the monkey said, peeing across the carpet’. In the mid-20th there was a vogue for turning innocent phrases into innocent phrase into innuendos by adding ‘as the bishop said to the actress’, or vice versa. The genre is named after Sam Weller in Dickens's The Pickwick Papers ( 1836 ). Archer Taylor , The Proverb (1962), 200–20; Florence E. Baer , Folklore 94 (1983),...

fortune-telling

fortune-telling   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

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2003

...or by learning from handbooks. Astrology , palmistry, and numerology were known in the Middle Ages; cheap booklets explaining them were readily available from the 16th to the 20th centuries. The 18th century saw the beginnings of fortune-telling by playing-cards, and by reading tea leaves and coffee grounds; the late 19th century brought Tarot and crystal-gazing, and the 20th century the I Ching and various newly invented systems using fanciful cards, runic symbols, and so forth. Since the 1960s, interest in such things has greatly increased (Davies,...

Arran

Arran   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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2004

...[Brit. aran , high place]. An island, 20 miles long by 8–10 miles wide, forming part of Strathclyde, Scotland; it is in the Firth of Clyde, about 50 miles due W of Glasgow. The island has been confused by many with the Aran Islands of Ireland, including those medieval commentators who thought the Fir Bolg might have fled here instead of to the west of Ireland. A minority of commentators have asserted it to be the model for Emain Ablach , the otherworldly realm of Mannanán mac Lir , the Irish sea-god. The most resounding local legends focus on the...

Continuous Creation Theory

Continuous Creation Theory  

A Dictionary of Creation Myths

...fails, the atoms break away from each other and disappear into space. More hydrogen atoms are formed, and the whole process begins again. The theory might be called the breathing universe theory ( see also Creation from Nothing ; Creation in Science ). Source: Leach, 19–20...

toadman

toadman   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

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.... This is an East Anglian term, current till the mid-20th century, for a man with an uncanny knack of controlling horses, supposedly obtained by possession of a toad's magical bone ( see horseman's word ). The term ‘toad-doctor’, however, as used by working-class Londoners in 1939 , meant someone who cures people of aches and pains by selling them dried toad's legs, to be worn in a leather pouch round one's neck ( Balleine , 1939 :...

weighing

weighing   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

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2003

...fate to count things too closely, there was previously a prejudice in many people's minds about weighing newborn babies. First noticed by Chambers ( 1878 : ii. 39), from Suffolk, although it was clearly well entrenched already, the belief is reported a number of times into the 20th century, and was not even extinct in the 1950s ( Folk-Lore 68 ( 1957 ), 414). Opie and Tatem also record an earlier reference to the weighing of adults being considered unlucky, published in the British Apollo ( 7 Sept. 1709 ). Opie and Tatem , 1989:...

yellow

yellow   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

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2003

.... This colour carries few meanings in English lore, and no beliefs are attached to it. In the Middle Ages it stood for jealousy and treachery, and in the 19th and 20th centuries for cowardice; ‘yellow-belly’ is a mocking nickname for people of marshy districts, comparing them to frogs. In America a yellow ribbon indicates loyalty to an absent soldier or prisoner; this symbolism is spreading in...

Gardiner, Henry Balfour

Gardiner, Henry Balfour (1877–1950)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

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2003

...Henry Balfour ( 1877–1950 ). One of several young English composers who caught the craze for folk music in the first years of the 20th century. Between 1905 and 1907 he assisted George Barnet Gardiner (no relation) in collecting forays in Hampshire, as the latter lacked the necessary musical skill to note the tunes. Balfour Gardiner noted over 100 items, some of which were published in Folk Songs from Hampshire ( 1909 ), and the manuscripts of which are in the Vaughan Williams Memorial Library . Stephen Lloyd , H. Balfour Gardiner (1984),...

Gavrinis

Gavrinis   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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2004

...of goats ]. Site of the most lavishly decorated megalithic tomb ( c. 3500 bc ) in Europe; a small island in the Gulf of Morbihan, off the south coast of Brittany , 7 miles SW of Vannes. Often compared with the passage grave at Newgrange, Co. Meath, the Gavrinis tomb is smaller (20 feet high, 164 feet round), older, and more decorated. The island was once the destination of Christian pilgrimages and features prominently in Breton folklore. The islet of Er-Lannic just south of Gavrinis contains two stone...

Iverni

Iverni   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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2004

...cent. ad ) used the name Iverni for what he perceived to be a section of the Irish people. Modern commentators have deduced that he derived this from the Érainn people of early Ireland, specifically their subdivision, the Corcu Loígde of what is today Co. Cork. In the early 20th century the anglicized term ‘Ivernian’ was often used to denote the ancient Irish people as a whole. See also IRELAND...

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