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20/20

Subject: Music

This US group was formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1978 by Steve Allen (guitar, vocals) and Ron Flynt (bass, vocals), two expatriate musicians from Tulsa, Oklahoma. Drummer Mike Gallo ...

Web 1.0/Web 2.0

Web 1.0/Web 2.0   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to the English Language (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...Web 1.0/Web 2.0 . The terms Web 1.0 and Web 2.0 are typically used to compare different stages in the development of the World Wide Web (invented in 1989 by Tim Berners-Lee). As the numbers suggest, Web 1.0 is used to refer to the first stage in the development of the web, whereas Web 2.0 (a term coined in 1999 ) denotes a later stage, which became prominent in the mid-2000s. At the heart of the comparison between Web 1.0 and Web 2.0 is a perceived shift with respect to the web’s interactivity. Web 1.0 is seen as a read-only, comparatively...

20

20   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Abbreviations

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Encyclopedias, Language reference
Length:
2 words

... ...

20

20 [Atomic number]   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Abbreviations

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Encyclopedias, Language reference
Length:
4 words

... [Atomic number] ...

20

20 [Vehicle Registration codes]   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Abbreviations

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Encyclopedias, Language reference
Length:
6 words

... [Vehicle Registration codes] Genge,...

20

20 [European Customs Form]   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Abbreviations

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Encyclopedias, Language reference
Length:
7 words

... [European Customs Form] quality data...

20

20 [Vehicle Registration codes]   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Abbreviations

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Encyclopedias, Language reference
Length:
7 words

... [Vehicle Registration codes] Denizli province,...

G-20

G-20   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Abbreviations

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Encyclopedias, Language reference
Length:
7 words

...20 Group of 20 (leading international...

4-20

4-20   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Abbreviations

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Encyclopedias, Language reference
Length:
11 words

...20 April 20 = Hippie Holiday = day to smoke...

10-20

10-20 [Police communication]   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Abbreviations

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Encyclopedias, Language reference
Length:
7 words

...20 [Police communication] my location is...

M20

M20 [Astronomy]   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Abbreviations

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Encyclopedias, Language reference
Length:
9 words

...20 [Astronomy] Trifid diffuse nebula with dust in...

52-20 Club

52-20 Club n. (US)   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
94 words

...20 Club n. ( US ) a notional club that took advantage of the US government's payment to ex-Gls of $20/week for one year (52 weeks) or until they could find a job. 1965 L. Bruce How to Talk Dirty 27: My real reason for going to the Veteran's Administration […] was the 52-20 Club. The Government gave all ex-GIs $20 a week for a year or until they could find a job. The accepted smart-thing-to-do was to find an employer who didn't report your ages […] then you could grab the $20 plus your...

Fathers of the 20th century

Fathers of the 20th century   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...of the 20th century . The title ‘Father of’ has long been traditionally applied to a leader, inventor or pioneer of some kind, such as Hippocrates ( 460–377 bc ), the Father of Medicine, or George Washington ( 1732–99 ), the Father of America. The following are some modern ‘Fathers’ in various fields (in order of subject Father of American Music: Charles Ives ( 1874–1954 ), US composer Father of Australia: Sir Edmund Barton ( 1849–1920 ), the first Australian prime minister ( 1901–3 ) Father of Country Music: Jimmie Rodgers ( 1897–1933 ), US...

Dragged kicking and screaming into the 20th century

Dragged kicking and screaming into the 20th century   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...kicking and screaming into the 20th century . A phrase applied to any person or institution that is reluctant to modernize or resistant to progress. In current usage ‘21st century’ is often used instead. [Listening to ragtime] he felt literally dragged out of the nineteenth into the 20th century. j.b. priestley : in London Opinion , 1913 A change, slight but unmistakable, has taken place; the English theatre has been dragged, as Adlai Stevenson once said of the Republican Party, kicking and screaming into the 20th century. kenneth tynan : Curtains ...

Advertising slogans of the 20th and 21st centuries

Advertising slogans of the 20th and 21st centuries   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...slogans of the 20th and 21st centuries . The ever-pervasive media of the 20th and 21st centuries has etched several advertising slogans on the collective consciousness, even when no actual interest is individually shown in the particular product. The most powerful have undoubtedly been those shown in television commercials, although the printed advertisements of the first half of the 20th century also generated many memorable phrases. Rhymes, puns and wordplay are often evident. The following is a selection of some of the best known, with the name of...

-cast

-cast   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
53 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

.... On the analogy of broadcast , many 20th-century neologisms arose, such as cablecast ( 1975 ), podcast ( 2004 ), radiocast ( 1931 ), simulcast ( 1948 ), and telecast ( 1937 ). They are irregular verbs (like cast itself) that don't change in the past tense. Adding -ed , though fairly common, is incorrect. For individual treatments, see broadcast , cablecast , radiocast & telecast...

Sentence Length

Sentence Length   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
290 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...No one knows precisely. Rhetoricians and readability specialists have long suggested aiming for sentences of varying lengths, but with an average of about 20 to 25 words. And empirical evidence seems to bear out this rough guideline. In 1985 , three authors calculated figures for several publications, using extensive samples: Publication Average Sentence Length Pittsburgh Press 20 Reader's Digest 20.4 Popular Mechanics 21.8 Science Digest 22 Field & Stream 22.8 Newsweek 24 Time 24.4 Scientific American 24.9 New York Times 26.6 Wall Street Journal 27...

-esque

-esque   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
99 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

.... This suffix—meaning “like, resembling”—almost always creates a solid word, as in romanesque , Rubenesque , statuesque . E.g.: “One could almost see the Clintonesque curling and biting of the lip for dramatic effect.” “New Democrats and New Laborites,” Omaha World-Herald , 20 Nov. 1997 , at 28. Of course, given the suffix's meaning, it's wrong to add -like to the end of such a word—e.g.: “A man painted in white stands on a pedestal striking various statuesque-like [read statue-like or statuesque ] poses.” Alan Byrd , “Will the Real Key West...

Neologisms

Neologisms   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
276 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...known. Fortunately, lexicographers monitor new entrants into the language and periodically publish compilations such as these: John Ayto , 20th Century Words ( 1999 ); Stuart Berg Flexner & Anne H. Soukhanov , Speaking Freely ( 1997 ); Sara Tulloch , The Oxford Dictionary of New Words ( 1991 ); John Algeo , Fifty Years Among the New Words ( 1991 ). It is sobering to record what the greatest of late-20th-century lexicographers said about the slow acceptance of new words: “It usually takes slightly more than a century for a word to reach such a...

-ize

-ize   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
135 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...is one of the most frequently used ways of forming new verbs. Many verbs so formed are unobjectionable—e.g.: authorize , baptize , familiarize , recognize , sterilize , and symbolize . The religious leader Norman Vincent Peale helped popularize (ahem) the suffix in the mid-20th century: “‘ Picturize , prayerize , and actualize ’ was Peale's key formula.” Tim Stafford , “God's Salesman,” Christianity Today , 21 June 1993 , at 35. But neologisms ending in -ize are generally to be discouraged, for they are usually ungainly and often superfluous....

extra-

extra-   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
259 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...(= lying outside the province or scope of) is a prefix that, during the 20th century, has formed hundreds of new adjectives—mostly for learned or literary purposes. The prefix has been adopted by many writers to form neologisms not yet found in unabridged dictionaries. These writers usually do no harm and, in fact, occasionally coin useful words. Following are four representative examples of 20th-century neologisms using this prefix—which, by the way, usually takes no hyphen: • “This means that he studies telepathy, clairvoyance and other extrasensory ...

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