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terrorism

Subject: History

The calculated use of violence or threat of violence to inculcate fear. Terrorism is intended to coerce or intimidate governments or societies in the pursuit of goals that are generally ...

Vladimir Presnyakov

Vladimir Presnyakov  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1974– ) and(1969– )Playwrights from Ekaterinburg in central Russia, part of the Russian ‘New Drama’, whose work includes Terrorism (2002) and Playing the Victim (2004), both staged at the Moscow ...
Presnyakov, Vladimir

Presnyakov, Vladimir (1974)   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
69 words

...Vladimir ( 1974 – ) and Oleg ( 1969 – ) Playwrights from Ekaterinburg in central Russia, part of the Russian ‘New Drama’, whose work includes Terrorism ( 2002 ) and Playing the Victim ( 2004 ), both staged at the *Moscow Art Theatre and later at London's *Royal Court . The Presnyakovs explore a world where the performance of violence is the only means of emotional expression. Birgit...

Stephens, Simon

Stephens, Simon   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
83 words

...) are domestic, somewhat *naturalistic dramas depicting the effect on ordinary people of violence, scandal, and loss. Motortown ( 2006 ) and Pornography ( 2007 ) capture, through increasingly complex theatrical forms, the mindset of a society blighted by lovelessness and terrorism. Dan...

Singh, Gursharan

Singh, Gursharan (1929)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Indian Theatre

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
119 words

...he founded in 1964 the Natak Kala Kendra in Amritsar, which has proved the nursery of many *Punjabi theatre workers. His street-theatre activity since then has inspired a generation of activists and impacted Punjabi rural communities in general. At the height of Sikh terrorism in the 1980s, he continued to perform, regardless of the threat to his life. Whether as actor, author, or director, Singh aims at theatre for social change and for civil rights. He has written over fifty plays—notable among them Tohya (‘Ditch’) and Kursiwala te manjiwala...

Lagerkvist, Pär

Lagerkvist, Pär   Reference library

David Thomas

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
180 words

...violence. His anti-Nazi play The Hangman , directed by Lindberg in 1934 with Gösta Ekman in the lead role, was warmly received in Norway but caused some embarrassment in a Sweden that had many Nazi sympathizers. Lagerkvist's remaining plays were mainly concerned with terrorism, The Man without a Soul ( 1936 ), and the struggle between democracy and Nazism, Victory in the Dark ( 1939 ). David...

Lagerkvist, Pär

Lagerkvist, Pär   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
173 words

...violence. His anti-Nazi play The Hangman , directed by Lindberg in 1934 with Gösta Ekman in the lead role, was warmly received in Norway but caused some embarrassment in a Sweden that had many Nazi sympathizers. Lagerkvist's remaining plays were mainly concerned with terrorism, The Man without a Soul ( 1936 ), and the struggle between democracy and Nazism, Victory in the Dark ( 1939 ). David...

Brenton, Howard

Brenton, Howard (1942)   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Companion to the Theatre (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
254 words

...dramatist, a political dramatist like Howard Barker who deals with large themes. He wrote his first play in 1965 while still at Cambridge, his first full-length play Revenge ( 1969 ) being seen at the Royal Court , as was Magnificence ( 1973 ), which deals with urban terrorism. Brassneck (also 1973 ), written in collaboration with David Hare , is about local government corruption, and The Churchill Play ( 1974 ), set in Britain in 1984 under a coalition government, shows political dissidents being brutally treated by the army. (A revised...

Paul Kauvar; or, Anarchy

Paul Kauvar; or, Anarchy (1887)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Theatre (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
267 words

...Kauvar; or, Anarchy ( 1887 ) , a play by Steele MacKaye . [Standard Theatre, approx. 100 perf.] Paul Kauvar ( Joseph Haworth ), a commoner who has risen to high rank in the French Revolution, is repelled by its swift drift into terrorism, and he attempts to harbor, under aliases, the Duc de Beaumont ( Edwin Varrey ) and the Duc's daughter, Diane ( Annie Robe ), whom he secretly marries. The notorious and duplicitous Gouroc (Wilton Lackaye ) betrays the Duc and makes it seem that Kauvar wittingly issued the death warrant. To show his innocence Paul...

Aulakh, Ajmer Singh

Aulakh, Ajmer Singh (1942)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Indian Theatre

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
276 words

...to bestow favours on her brother-in-law. The next anthology, Anhe nishanchi (‘Blind Shooters’, 1983 ), presents violence as the last political weapon in the hands of the desperate and deprived peasantry. The adaptation Bhajian bahin (‘Broken Arms’, 1988 ) draws upon the terrorism which, in that decade, played havoc with life in Punjab's countryside. The full-length Kehar Singh di maut (‘ Kehar Singh 's Death’, 1992 ), Aulakh's original encounter with this theme, is not as gripping because he is essentially a master of the play-in-miniature....

Sarma, Arun

Sarma, Arun (1931)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Indian Theatre

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
262 words

...in several Sarma plays. He is not averse to politics either. Buranji path (‘History Lessons’, 1980 ), Baghjal (‘Tiger Trap’, staged 1983 ), and Chinyor (‘Scream’, 1984 ) follow the Marxist path, whereas Anya ek adhyay (‘A Different Chapter’, 1995 ) is a criticism of terrorism, relevant to the prevalent terrorist climate in Assam over the last two decades. Dialogue in Sarma's dramas emphatically establishes their quality as literature. His ability to choose expressive and resonant vocabulary may be directly related to his twenty-nine-year-long career...

Brenton, Howard

Brenton, Howard   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
394 words

...the Antarctic ( 1971 ). He used a collage of styles to capture the ‘society of the spectacle’, Guy Debord 's term for the superficial and mediatized world of images of Western society. Brenton was soon taken up by major theatres: he wrote a pungent intervention on political terrorism, Magnificence ( 1973 ), for the *Royal Court ; The Churchill Play ( 1974 , revised 1979 ), a dystopian vision of Britain under military rule, for the *Royal Shakespeare Company ; and Weapons of Happiness ( 1976 ) for the *National Theatre . He worked with other writers...

Brenton, Howard

Brenton, Howard   Reference library

Dan Rebellato

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
441 words

...situationism, he used a collage of styles to capture the ‘society of the spectacle’, Guy Debord's term for the superficial and mediatized world of images that Western society had become. Brenton was soon taken up by major theatres: he wrote a pungent intervention on political terrorism, Magnificence ( 1973 ), for the Royal Court ; The Churchill Play ( 1974 , revised 1979 ) , a dystopian vision of Britain under military rule, for the Royal Shakespeare Company ; and Weapons of Happiness ( 1976 ) for the National Theatre . His instincts are unusually...

Punjabi theatre

Punjabi theatre   Reference library

Neelam Man Singh Chowdhry

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
647 words

...for a new idiom, relying on a symbolic approach, and the playwright Ajmer Aulak , working in Mansa, produced Ik Ramayana Hor ( One More Ramayana ) and Anne Nishanchi ( Blind Shooters ), poignant studies of Punjabi rural life. In the 1980s Punjab was in the grip of violent terrorism between Sikhs and Hindus. The Punjabi language became associated with the Sikhs, and non-Sikh performers switched to Hindi . Actors were thus severed from their language, myths, images, and history. This politicization of language led to a new political genre, exemplified by...

Marathi theatre

Marathi theatre   Reference library

Shanta Gokhale

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
1,287 words

...of Mahatma Gandhi. Violent protests by Congress Party workers led to its banning. Santosh Pawar's Yadakadachit ( Perhaps , 2000 ), an energetic satire using Mahabharata characters, was also censored by the Shiv Sena before it could be performed. Growing cultural terrorism by sectarian groups, aggravated by Mumbai's predatory capitalism and rampant consumerism, soon made experimental theatre in the city unviable. Former fringe playwrights now write for the mainstream theatre. Amongst the more significant are Prashant Dalvi , Premanand Gajvi ,...

Behan, Brendan

Behan, Brendan (9 Feb. 1923)   Reference library

The Continuum Companion to Twentieth Century Theatre

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
224 words

...Francis ] (b. Dublin , 9 Feb. 1923 ; d. Dublin , 20 March 1964 ) Journalist , raconteur and playwright . A member of a strongly republican family, he joined Fíanna Eireann, the youth wing of the IRA, serving prison sentences in Ireland and Britain. He gradually renounced terrorism; his best play, The Quare Fellow (Pike Theatre, Dublin, 1954 ), is a subtle call for the abolition of capital punishment. This was followed by An Gíall (Halla an Damer, Dublin, 1958 ), subsequently translated into English by the author and adapted by Joan Littlewood in...

Ashes

Ashes (1973)   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Plays (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...destroying life when others are desperate to create it, Colin allies the sterility of Northern Irish bigotry to the sterility of his marriage: ‘the clan, from whose loins I come, had turned me out; to my own loins no child of tomorrow shall come.’ Rudkin's reflections on terrorism seem particularly relevant to the suicide-bombers of the 21st century: ‘If an undertribe can commit themselves to such atrocity, there must be some terrible misery they are trying to...

States of Shock

States of Shock (1991)   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Plays (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...response to the 1991 ‘Desert Storm’ repulsion of Iraq from Kuwait. However, its analysis of the ‘American nightmare’ (‘This country wasn't founded on spineless, spur-of-the-moment whimsy. The effects are international! universal !’) was even more relevant to the ‘war against terrorism’ and the invasion of Iraq a decade later. John Malkovich played the Colonel at the...

Floods, The

Floods, The (1979)   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Plays (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...in the lake a body of a soldier who had been savagely mutilated and murdered. In her bungalow, Nankya, a ‘pseudo-intellectual’ and feminist, refuses to leave, despite the pleadings of her former lover, Bwogo, who is head of the State Research Bureau, the RSB, a cover for state terrorism. Bwogo assumes the role of a journalist and interviews Nankya, who supports the violent communist insurrection in the south of the country. Bwogo is appalled, but it appears that he too has committed murderous acts. Kyeyune comes to shelter in the bungalow, but added to the...

Mercy Seat, The

Mercy Seat, The (2002)   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Plays (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...of the horror of the catastrophe and the resilience of Americans in the face of it, LaBute’s focus is almost entirely on the agonizing relationship between Ben and Abby, played at the New York premiere by Sigourney Weaver. As LaBute said, he was describing ‘a particular kind of terrorism: the painful, simplistic warfare we often wage on the hearts of those we profess to love’. LaBute is often described as a misanthrope, but his searing analysis of human relationships suggests not so much that he hates humankind but would inspire them to be more loving and more...

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