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Joliot-Curie, Irène

Joliot-Curie, Irène (1897–1956)   Quick reference

Who's Who in the Twentieth Century

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History
Length:
214 words

...Curie, Irène ( 1897–1956 ) French physicist who, in collaboration with her husband, Frédéric Joliot-Curie ( 1900–58 ), discovered artificial radioactivity. For this they were awarded the 1935 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. The daughter of the early Nobel laureates Pierre and Marie Curie , Irène Curie obtained a doctorate from the Sorbonne in 1925 and married her mother's research assistant, Frédéric Joliot , a year later. Together they worked under Marie Curie at the Radium Institute in Paris – Irène eventually becoming director of the institute...

Curie, Marie

Curie, Marie (1867–1934)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History
Length:
815 words
Illustration(s):
1

...on 3 July 1934 . [ See also Joliot‐Curie, Irène , and Science, subentry Natural Sciences .] Bibliography Curie, Ève . Madame Curie . Translated by Vincent Sheean . Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1937. Curie, Marie . Pierre Curie . Translated by Charlotte and Vernon Kellogg . With an introduction by Mrs. William Brown Meloney and autobiographical notes by Marie Curie. New York: Macmillan, 1923. Goldsmith, Barbara . Obsessive Genius: The Inner World of Marie Curie . New York: Norton, 2005. Quinn, Susan . Marie Curie: A Life . New York: Simon and...

Curie, Marie

Curie, Marie (1867–1934)   Quick reference

Who's Who in the Twentieth Century

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History
Length:
465 words

...the radiation produced by the new elements. Pierre died in 1906 in a road accident. Marie , by then with two daughters ( see Joliot-Curie, Irène ), succeeded to her late husband's chair of physics at the Sorbonne. Much of Marie's later life was spent in raising funds to pursue her research and to establish an appropriate institution in which to pursue the work. Fortunately Marie Curie's US admirers presented her with one gram of radium in 1921 , when it was worth $100,000. The Sorbonne created for her the Curie Laboratory which, though opened in 1914 ,...

Joliot‐Curie, Irène

Joliot‐Curie, Irène (1897–1956)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History
Length:
639 words

...Curie, Irène ( 1897–1956 ), Nobel Prize–winning physicist. The daughter of two remarkable physicists, Pierre and Marie (Sklodowska) Curie, Irène Curie followed in the footsteps of her parents as a notable Nobel Prize–winning physicist studying the properties of radioactive substances. She was born in Paris on 12 September 1897 and, as a child, experienced experimental teaching by an unusual group of scientists surrounding her parents. She received her baccalaureate from the Collège Sévigné in 1914 and accompanied her mother during World War I as a...

Sciences

Sciences   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History
Length:
6,174 words
Illustration(s):
2

...entomologist and conchologist Thomas Say , was a superb illustrator—her drawings of invertebrates were included in many of her husband's published works. The best‐known case, but only one of many, of collaboration with a male partner was, of course, that between Marie Curie and her husband Pierre ( 1859–1906 ). Professionalization. In the nineteenth century, amateurs became increasingly restricted to certain types of activities, whereas professionals—no matter how amateur and professional are defined—were able to attack and perhaps conquer the more difficult...

Nobel Prizes

Nobel Prizes   Reference library

Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
687 words
Illustration(s):
1

...in any field, the Nobel Prize comprises a medal and a variable amount of money (initially about 150,000 Swedish crowns), which can equal $1 million, depending on the annual profits and dividends of the Nobel companies. Among famous laureates were Pierre Curie ( 1859–1906 ) and his wife, Marie Curie ( 1867–1934 ); the latter won the Nobel twice and was the first woman to be given the award (in 1903 and 1911 ). Oddly, Albert Einstein ( 1879–1955 ) won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1921 not for his famous theory about relativity, but rather for...

Dieng-Kuntz, Rose

Dieng-Kuntz, Rose (1956)   Reference library

Dictionary of African Biography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
766 words

...scholarly contributions, editing or coauthoring a number of books. In 1995 Rose Dieng-Kuntz was named head of the Acacia project and remained in that job until her death. In recognition of her important contributions to science, she was awarded the prestigious Irène Joliot-Curie award for women scientists in 2005 and made a Knight of the Order of the French Legion of Honor in 2006 . Rose Dieng-Kuntz worked for over twenty years as a senior research scientist and leader of the Acacia project investigating knowledge acquisition for aided design through...

Cancer

Cancer   Reference library

Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
1,828 words

...by unscrupulous practitioners. Marie Curie ( 1867–1934 ) and Pierre Curie ( 1859–1906 ) recognized the potential value of radiation against cancer in 1896 when they observed that burns suffered from radiation healed as normal, unscarred tissue. Experiments at Memorial Hospital in New York in 1925 with targeted irradiation of tumors showed promising results. Congress created the National Cancer Institute ( NCI ) in 1937 to coordinate radiotherapy studies and other areas of research. The deaths of Madame Curie and other scientists who worked with...

Santos, Isabel dos

Santos, Isabel dos (1973)   Reference library

Dictionary of African Biography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,078 words

...Sindika Dokolo, then thirty years old, and the son of a Congolese millionaire who founded the Bank of Kinshasa. Their wedding ceremony brought almost eight hundred people to Luanda and lasted for three days. Even though he studied economics at the University of Paris Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris, Sindika is better known for his links to the contemporary art world in Africa. He inherited a collection of nineteenth-century Congolese art from his father, who died in 2001 . He also acquired the contemporary art collection of the German art dealer Hans...

Nuclear Weapons

Nuclear Weapons   Reference library

Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
4,906 words
Illustration(s):
1

...à l'Énergie Atomique (Atomic Energy Commission) in 1945 with the intent of exploring both civilian and military applications of nuclear power. Pierre Joliot-Curie headed the commission, which overcame Anglo-American control of known supplies of uranium ore and developed the industrial capabilities to refine both it and the other materials needed in nuclear reactors. In the mid-1950s, Prime Minister Pierre Mendes-France decided to develop an atomic bomb, leading to the first French nuclear weapons test in 1960 in the Algerian desert. Although this...

Caicedo, Hugo

Caicedo, Hugo (1980– )   Reference library

Edwin Corena Puentes and Amy Savage

Dictionary of Caribbean and Afro–Latin American Biography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
491 words

...the most prestigious research centers in the world. He was a graduate research fellow at the University of Illinois in Chicago. In 2009 , while he was studying for his doctorate in biomedical engineering, he earned a scholarship for a summer exchange with the Université Pierre et Marie Curie (UPMC) in Paris. In 2011 he was awarded three more scholarships, notably one from the National Science Foundation in the United States. Caicedo has also studied at Harvard University and MIT, helping to further research in new strategies for the development of...

19th century

19th century: 1800 - 1900  

Reference type:
Timeline
Current Version:
2012

...1898 1898 British chemists William Ramsay and Morris Travers isolate the element xenon xenon A Dictionary of Chemistry 6 Victorian era Britain 1750-1900 Science Chemistry Great Britain - from 1707 United Kingdom - from 1801 British Isles Europe Britain 1898 1898 Marie Curie and her husband Pierre isolate a new element which they name polonium in honour of her native Poland polonium A Dictionary of Physics 6 Science Chemistry Europe France 1898 1898 French and British forces meet at Fashoda, in a potentially explosive incident in the scramble for Africa Fashoda...

20th century

20th century: 1900 - 1999  

Reference type:
Timeline
Current Version:
2012

...first solo show in London Bacon, Francis (1909–1992) Who's Who in the Twentieth Century 1 1930s Arts Painting British painting British art Great Britain - from 1707 United Kingdom - from 1801 British Isles Europe Britain 1934 1934 Frédéric and Irène Joliot-Curie discover artificial radioactivity Joliot-Curie, Irène (1897–1956) Who's Who in the Twentieth Century 1 1930s Science Physics Europe France 1934 1934 Erich Korngold, one of Austria's most admired composers, moves to Hollywood Korngold, Erich Wolfgang (29 May 1897) The Oxford Companion to Music 1 rev...

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