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psychophysics

psychophysics   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
1,586 words
Illustration(s):
1

...method of measuring sensations. If a luminance L 2 can just be distinguished as greater than L 1 , then, to a close approximation, L 2 / L 1 is constant; this is Weber's law (formulated as the Weber–Fechner law). If one supposes that all just-noticeable differences (e.g. between L 1 and L 2 ) are subjectively equivalent, then the sensation (in this case, of brightness) must increase as the logarithm of the physical stimulus magnitude, for if L 2 / L 1 , is constant, so also is log L 2 − log L 1 . Fechner's logarithmic measure was...

motion perception

motion perception   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
2,604 words
Illustration(s):
9

...judged directly, not by calculating the ratio of time/distance or the like. Surprisingly, observers are insensitive to the changes in speed of an accelerating target, and the j.n.d. is about 15 per cent, probably because the visual system integrates the motion over a period of 0.1–0.2 second, which tends to blur out any speed differences that occur within this time window. Motion coherence has been studied with the random-dot kinematograms shown in Fig. 3. Because the correlated dots all move in the same direction, the fraction of correlated dots controls the...

Digital Media

Digital Media   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
5,396 words
Illustration(s):
1

...an architect's client may not be limited to seeing a few perspective renderings of a project from predetermined viewpoints, but may employ interactive viewing software to “walk” through it at will. VRML and other formats for presenting three-dimensional “worlds” on the World Wide Web allow viewers to control camera pans and zooms. And in emerging object-based television systems, camera angles and lighting can potentially be controlled at the reception rather than the production end of a transmission; the viewer thus takes over traditional directorial...

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