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Demetrius (20)

Of Troezen (probably 1st cent. ad), wrote works on literary history. The only known title is that of his work on philosophers, Against the Sophists. Athenaeus 1. 29a;Diogenes ...

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

A Midsummer Night’s Dream   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,220 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...’s Knight’s Tale, to which Shakespeare would return, with Fletcher , nearly 20 years later, dramatizing it as The Two Noble Kinsmen . Chaucer’s story provides the basis for Shakespeare’s depiction of Theseus and Hippolyta’s marriage, which it juxtaposes, furthermore, with a rivalry between two men for the same woman, source for the competition between Lysander and Demetrius over Hermia. Shakespeare, however, adds a second woman, Helena, who has earlier been jilted by Demetrius, and thereby repeats the pattern of love intrigues he had deployed in The Two...

Diadochi and Successor Kingdoms

Diadochi and Successor Kingdoms   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,701 words
Illustration(s):
1

...increasingly accessible, though these are often not effectively integrated into historical reconstructions by modern scholars. Books 18–20 of Diodorus Siculus’ Bibliothēkē ( Library of History ; first century bce ) contain the fullest extant account of the years 323–301 , and this may be supplemented and extended by Plutarch's relevant Vitae parallelae ( Parallel Lives )—the Phocion , Demosthenes , Eumenes , Demetrius , and Pyrrhus —and the generalized epitome of Pompeius Trogus’ lost Historiae Philippicae ( Philippic History ) by Justin. Book 10 of...

Robin Goodfellow

Robin Goodfellow   Reference library

Anne Button

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
286 words
Illustration(s):
1

...He acts as Oberon ’s assistant in enchanting Titania , Bottom , and the lovers, and enjoys the confusion he causes when he accidentally enchants Lysander instead of Demetrius. ( See also fairies .) In the 19th century it was a woman’s part (sometimes a girl’s— Ellen Terry took the role aged 8), often hampered by attempts at rendering magic and flying through cumbersome machinery. In the 20th century the part has been played more often by men since Granville-Barker ’s 1914 production (in which Puck was played by Donald Calthrop). A notable exception was...

1 Maccabees

1 Maccabees   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
9,140 words
Illustration(s):
2

...(pretender to Seleucid throne) and Demetrius I compete for Jonathan's support; Alexander defeats Demetrius 10:51–66 Alexander allies with Ptolemy, and honors Jonathan 10:67–89 Demetrius II arrives; Jonathan defeats his army 11:1–19 Ptolemy and Alexander die after battle; Demetrius II supreme 11:20–53 Jonathan supports Demetrius II (Trypho emerges, 38-40) 11:54–59 Trypho and Antiochus VI bid for Jonathan and Simon's support 11:60–74 Jonathan takes control of Askalon, Gaza; Simon takes Beth-zur; Jonathan defeats Demetrius's army near Hazor 12:1–23 Jonathan...

Pesharim

Pesharim   Reference library

James Hamilton Charlesworth and Henry W. Morisada Rietz

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
3,494 words
Illustration(s):
1

...Collection, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress 75 and 1 b.c.e. This pesher is particularly interesting because it explicitly mentions two historical personages, “[Deme]trius” (frgs. 3–4 1.2), who is probably to be identified as Demetrius III Eukerus ( 95–88 b.c.e. ), and “Antiochus” (frgs. 3–4 1.3). The pesher interprets Nahum as predicting that Demetrius helped the Pharisaic uprising against Alexander Janneus (frgs. 3–4 1.1–3) and even Alexander Janneus's reprisal against the Pharisees (frgs. 3–4 1.6–10). Alexander Janneus, called the...

Argeads

Argeads   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
974 words
Illustration(s):
1

...of the last Argead male in about 309 , Macedon's fortunes were guided by the house of Cassander, but the death of Philip IV in 297/6 was followed by a period of instability that preceded the establishment of the Antigonid line in 278 bce by Antigonus II Gonatas , son of Demetrius I Poliorcetes (“the Besieger,” whose life spanned the years 336 to 283 bce ). [ See also Macedon .] The Argead Kings of Macedon [Caranus] Perdiccas I Argaeus Philip I Aëropus I Alcetas Amyntas I ( d. 498/7 ) Alexander I (r. 498 /7 – 454 ) Perdiccas II ( r. 454–413 )...

Columns, Commemorative

Columns, Commemorative   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,452 words
Illustration(s):
1

...other recipient, or the reason for the gift. In the Hellenistic period ( 323–31 bce ) commemorative portraits were erected on columns. After noting that the Greeks invented the convention of placing statues on top of columns, Pliny the Elder remarks that the Athenian governor Demetrius of Phaleron ( c.350 –after 297 bce ) had more statues dedicated to himself than did any other statesman ( Natural History 34.27). Pliny implies that some of these statues must have been supported by columns. At Delphi a monument made up of two Ionic columns supporting an...

Tel Kedesh

Tel Kedesh   Reference library

Andrea M. Berlin and Sharon C. Herbert

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Archaeology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Archaeology, Religion
Length:
5,536 words
Illustration(s):
4

...the Persian–Hellenistic Administrative Building, served under three successive foreign dynasties: the Achaemenid Persians, the Ptolemies, and the Seleucids. The building was abandoned after a nearby battle in 144/43 b.c.e. between the Hasmonean Jonathan and the Seleucid Demetrius II. It was partially reoccupied during the last third of the second century b.c.e. by people whose origins and affiliations are uncertain but whose lifestyle was different and poorer than that of the previous occupants. While the Administrative Building’s footprint remained...

Greece, prehistory and history of

Greece, prehistory and history of   Reference library

Paul Halstead, Oliver T. P. K. Dickinson, Simon Hornblower, and Antony J. S. Spawforth

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
5,602 words
Illustration(s):
1

...continues to emerge, and to shed light on these topics. Macedon itself was much fought over and partitioned: at different times it was subject not only to Demetrius Poliorcetes, but to Cassander, Lysimachus, and Pyrrhus of Epirus. Not until after 276 did Demetrius’ son Antigonus Gonatas consolidate the kingdom properly. Thereafter under the Antigonid rulers (Antingonus Doson; Demetrius II; Philip V) Macedon reverted to something like its historical role as it had been before it ballooned under Alexander, though older conceptions of an essentially...

Letters

Letters   Reference library

James M. Lindenberger

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
6,837 words
Illustration(s):
3

...in the Greco-Roman world there were handbooks of epistolography and anthologies of literary letters. A certain Demetrius (not the famous Demetrius of Phaleron), in his work “On Style” (of uncertain date, possibly first century c.e. , incorporating older material), includes an excursus on letter-writing style, urging the use of a “plain” style, “a little more formal than the dialogue.” Another writer, conventionally known as Pseudo-Demetrius (second century b.c.e. to third century c.e. ), wrote a treatise on “Epistolary Types” in which he lists...

Gezer

Gezer   Reference library

Steven M. Ortiz

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Archaeology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Archaeology, Religion
Length:
4,050 words
Illustration(s):
2

...period at Gezer is known only from tombs and material culture. The last occupation at Gezer was during the Hellenistic period. Naturally, one of the key questions is whether there is any archaeological evidence for the Seleucid and Hasmonean occupations. Several coins dating to Demetrius II (r. 145–139 and 129–125 b.c.e. ) were found, one with the name Antiochus VII (r. 138–129 b.c.e. ). In addition, several Rhodian jar handles were found, one with the stamp SIMIOU , “of Simon,” in Greek. Large quantities of Hellenistic pottery were uncovered. Most of the...

Hazor

Hazor   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
3,119 words
Illustration(s):
3

...in the Bible. 2 Kings 15:29 , describes the conquest of Hazor and most of the northern kingdom of Israel by Tiglath-Pileser III of Assyria. The latest reference to Hazor in connection with historical event—the battle between the Hasmonean Jonathan and the Syrian Demetrius in 147 bce , on the Plain of Hazor—is made in 1 Maccabees 11:67 . It is last mentioned in Josephus ( Antiq. 5.199). Excavation Results. Excavation has revealed that there is a difference in the history of occupation for the lower and upper cities. For this reason, the...

Warships

Warships   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Military History
Length:
15,668 words
Illustration(s):
5

...naval arms race started between Alexander’s successors, which produced ships of enormous proportions. One of the contenders, Demetrius I Poliorcetes (r. c. 294–c. 288 b.c.e. ), called “the Besieger,” took part in a sea battle near Salamis (Cyprus) in 306 b.c.e. with “sevens,” vessels that were rowed from one, two, or three levels. If we believe the historian Diodorus Siculus , who lived in the first century b.c.e. , Demetrius already in 315 b.c.e. had even larger vessels: “nines” and “tens.” The heavier the ships and the higher the numbers of...

Ancient Navies

Ancient Navies   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Military History
Length:
15,774 words
Illustration(s):
2

...with his son Demetrius —emerged as the most aggressive naval power of all, driving a naval arms race with his rivals that produced bigger and bigger ships designed to attack and defend the coastal cities so important to everyone’s aspirations. Bigger and Bigger Warships These new “Hellenistic navies” required larger warships than were built before, and our sources imply that they were introduced in rapid succession. In 307 , “sixes” and “sevens” are said to have helped Demetrius defeat Ptolemy off Cyprian Salamis; six years later Demetrius’s fleet contained...

Coins and Coinage

Coins and Coinage   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
6,270 words
Illustration(s):
9

...led to the increased appearance of portraits on coinage. The earliest coin portraits appear on issues from Persian satraps and Lycian dynastic coins of the fifth and fourth centuries, but portraits of living rulers did not become commonplace until the early third century when Demetrius Poliorcetes, Ptolemy I, and Seleucus I began to issue coins with their own images rather than that of the deified Alexander. Royal coinages often took precedence over the emissions of the cities, but civic coinage continued to be produced. Coins were also struck for intermediate...

Greece

Greece   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
14,677 words
Illustration(s):
5

...governor of Babylonia at the conference in Triparadisus, Syria. Upon the death of Antipater ( 319 ), Antigonus I Monophthalmus ( r. 323–301 ), satrap of Asia Minor, and his son Demetrius I Poliorcetes ( r. 294–288 ) attempted to gain the whole of the empire beginning in Asia and the Aegean, but at the Battle of Ipsus ( 301 ) Antigonus was killed and Demetrius was reduced to controlling a few minor cities. Prior to Ipsus, Seleucus I Nicator ( r. 306–281 ) had assumed the royal title and created the Seleucid kingdom ( 305–63 ), which was followed...

Dead Sea Scrolls

Dead Sea Scrolls   Reference library

Ken M. Penner

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
12,815 words
Illustration(s):
4

...of these commentaries are those on Psalm 37, Nahum, and Habakkuk. In the commentary on Psalm 37, a priest is identified as the “Teacher of Righteousness” and is opposed to a figure called the “Wicked Priest.” In 4QpNah, the Romans are called “Kittim,” and the historical figures Demetrius and Antiochus are named. A character called the “Angry Lion” is said to hang “seekers of smooth things” on a tree, and is commonly thought to refer to Alexander Janneus , who crucified Pharisees. In 1QpHab, the Chaldeans are interpreted as the Romans (Kittim), and here too...

Technology and Weapons

Technology and Weapons   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Military History
Length:
10,000 words
Illustration(s):
1

...torsion catapults became available in the Mediterranean. Their first attested deployment at sea occurred in a naval battle between the fleets of two of the would-be successors of Alexander the Great, Demetrius I Poliorcetes and Ptolemy I (Ptolemy Soter) at Salamis in 306 b.c.e. According to the first century b.c.e. historian Diodorus Siculus, Demetrius put stone-throwing catapults on the main decks of his ships and arrow-shooting catapults on their prows; thereafter catapults became standard on all decked warships. In the 30s b.c.e. the Roman ...

Ephesus

Ephesus   Reference library

Katherine A. Shaner

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Archaeology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Archaeology, Religion
Length:
7,786 words
Illustration(s):
1

...and Aquila, traveling companions of Paul, also spend time in Ephesus according to Acts 18:19–28 . Scholars are, however, very cautious when reconstructing historical events within Ephesus from the stories in Acts. For example, Luke, in Acts 19:23–41 , tells the story of Demetrius, the silversmith who accuses Paul of destroying the trade in silver Artemis shrines all over Asia Minor. Calling together his compatriots, a near riot ensues as they call a meeting of the ekklēsia , or democratic assembly of citizens in the theater. Eventually a representative...

Siege Warfare

Siege Warfare   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Medieval Warfare and Military Technology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Military History, Social sciences, Warfare and Defence
Length:
4,125 words
Illustration(s):
2

...out. Examples of narrative siege descriptions by Byzantine authors include Prokopios on the Gothic siege of Rome (537/38), in which the Goths used four siege towers; Agathias on Narses’ siege of Cumae (552/53), with a description of a sapping operation; the Miracles of St. Demetrius on the Avaro-Slav siege of Thessalonike (possibly 586 or or 597 ) describing what are presumably trebuchets, as well as rams and siege sheds; John Kameniates on the Arab siege of Thessalonike (904), with siege towers on ships; and Anna Komnene on the Norman siege of...

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