You are looking at 1-20 of 1,124 entries  for:

  • All: Alexander the Great x
  • Results with images only x
clear all

View:

Overview

Alexander the Great

[Na] Leader of the Macedonians. Born in 356 bc, Alexander was tutored in his early years by Aristotle before succeeding his father Philip as king of Macedonia and the mainland of ...

Alexander the Great

Alexander the Great   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Exploration

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History
Length:
2,363 words
Illustration(s):
1

... the Great This entry contains two subentries: Fact ; Fiction Fact Alexander was born in Macedonia, in northern Greece, in the summer of 356 b.c.e. Word came to Philip II , king of Macedonia, that his queen, Olympias , had given birth to a son at the same time that word came that his horses had won the premier chariot race at the Olympics. It would not be the last time that such omens attended Alexander. When Alexander was thirteen, his father brought the philosopher Aristotle to Macedonia to tutor Alexander, and from him Alexander developed an...

Alexander the Great

Alexander the Great (356–323bce)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
3,339 words
Illustration(s):
3

...Waldemar . Who's Who in the Age of Alexander the Great: Prosopography of Alexander's Empire . Oxford: Blackwell, 2006. Holt, Frank L. Alexander the Great and the Mystery of the Elephant Medallions . Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003. Holt, Frank L. Into the Land of Bones: Alexander the Great in Afghanistan . Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005. Lendering, Jona . Alexander de Grote: De ondergang van het Perzische rijk . Amsterdam: Athenaeum: Polak and Van Gennep, 2004. Tarn, William W. Alexander the Great . 2 vols. Cambridge,...

Alexander the Great

Alexander the Great (356–323)   Reference library

Albert Brian Bosworth

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
2,434 words
Illustration(s):
1

...south the kingdoms of Sambus and Musicanus were visited with fire and slaughter when their allegiance wavered, and, as he approached his base in the Indus delta (Patalene), the natives fled in terror (July 325). 7. Alexander now returned to the west, deputing Nearchus to take his fleet across the southern coastline while he led the main army through the Gedrosian desert (Makran), in emulation—so Nearchus claimed—of Cyrus the Great and Semiramis. The horrors of heat and famine which ensued were considerable, but perhaps exaggerated in the sources,...

35 The Slavonic Book in Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus

35 The Slavonic Book in Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
7,008 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
2

...and commissioned the new Civil *founts for secular publications. The state supplanted the Church as the main driving force behind printing. In the tsar’s new capital, the St Petersburg Press, established in 1711 , became the main publisher of government publications, notably the Vedomosti (News), the first printed Russian *newspaper . A new monastic press was established at the Alexander Nevsky Monastery outside St Petersburg in 1719 . The Moscow Printing House (known, from 1721 , as the Moscow Synodal Press) expanded, and the quantity of religious...

5 The European Medieval Book

5 The European Medieval Book   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
9,862 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...the paintings of the Flemish primitives, such as Jan Van Eyck (who had almost certainly contributed to MSS himself) and Gerard David . The great MS illuminators of Bruges and its environs included the Vienna Master of Mary of Burgundy (painter of Vienna, Österreichische Nationalbibliothek , Cod. 1857 ), Alexander Bening (d. 1518 , known from c .1469 ) and, above all, Simon *Bening , who was famous across Europe. In the northern Netherlands, there was almost no book illumination before 1400 . Utrecht, like Bruges, became important from about the ...

The Merchant of Venice

The Merchant of Venice   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,171 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...before the Lady’s maid warns him not to drink the wine which the Lady always offers her suitors before bed, which she drugs: he is thus enabled to win her. As in the play, the Jew is foiled in his attempt to exact a pound of flesh from the defaulting merchant. Shakespeare knew the pound of flesh story from other sources too, one of which, Alexander Silvayn ’s The Orator (translated in 1596 ), influenced his own trial scene. In rewriting the story of Giannetto as that of Bassanio, Shakespeare replaced the seduction test with the choice of the three...

44 The History of the Book in Australia

44 The History of the Book in Australia   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
6,048 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...in the 1860s is remarkable. The instant popular success of the Australian Journal (Melbourne, 1865–1962 ) gave colonial writers a major boost, in morale if not earning power, and the decade saw the emergence of prolific popular writers such as Garnet Walch and R. P. Whitworth . Marcus Clarke and ‘Rolf Boldrewood’ (Thomas Alexander Brown) began their careers as newspaper columnists, the precocious Clarke writing for Melbourne’s Australasian and Boldrewood for Sydney’s Australian Town and Country Journal . *Stenhouse , a Sydney lawyer, became the...

1 Writing Systems

1 Writing Systems   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
6,152 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
7

...in Greece in 403–2 bc . The eastern alphabetic link is indicated by the fact that in Mesopotamia, by the 5 th century bc , many cuneiform documents carried a notation of their substance in the 22 letters of the Aramaic alphabet, inked onto the tablet with a *writing brush . From the time of Alexander the Great onwards, cuneiform was increasingly superseded by Aramaic; it eventually fell into disuse around the beginning of the Christian era, with the last cuneiform inscription dated ad 75 . In Egypt, fairly soon after that, the Coptic alphabet (consisting...

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

A Midsummer Night’s Dream   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,220 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

... Barber, C. L. , in Shakespeare’s Festive Comedy (1957) Barton, Anne in Shakespeare and the Idea of the Play (1962) Dent, R. W. , ‘Imagination in A Midsummer Night’s Dream ’, Shakespeare Quarterly 15 (1964) Leggatt, Alexander , in Shakespeare’s Comedy of Love (1974) Montrose, Louis , ‘“Shaping Fantasies”: Configurations of Gender and Power in Elizabethan Culture’, Representations , 1 (1983) Young, David P. , ‘ Something of Great Constancy’: The Art of ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream ’...

20b The History of the Book in Britain, 1801–1914

20b The History of the Book in Britain, 1801–1914   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
5,058 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...saw the appearance of a rich body of fiction and poetry that has become part of the English literary canon. Among the principal authors of the day were Austen, Scott, the Brontës, Tennyson, the Rossettis, Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, Thackeray, Trollope, George Eliot, Meredith, Gissing, Stevenson, Hardy, and Wilde. In the *history of the book , however, these great names take their place among the vast number of unknown writers who contributed to the market for fiction and poetry. Those categories, in turn, exist in relation to religion, history, philosophy,...

3 The Ancient Book

3 The Ancient Book   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
6,942 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
2

...was by no means ubiquitous. 5.4 Libraries The tyrant Pisistratus, an early book collector himself, founded the first public library in Athens, although the books were carried off by Xerxes when he sacked the city in 480 bc . No public libraries are mentioned in the 5 th and 4 th centuries, but significant private collections were alluded to by Xenophon in the first half of the 4 th century bc , and Aristotle’s library in particular was notable for its size and breadth. After the death of Alexander the Great, the Ptolemies in Egypt developed a plan to set...

28 The History of the Book in Italy

28 The History of the Book in Italy   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
10,068 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...German work circulated widely in northern Europe in the 15 th century. Discovered in 1925 by the Munich bookseller Jacques *Rosenthal , the fragment was described by *Haebler in 1927 , before disappearing the following year into the collection of the Louisiana bibliophile Edward Alexander Parsons ( 1878–1962 ); it was forgotten until 1998 , when it resurfaced and was sold at auction ( see book auctions ) by *Christie ’s in London. The bibliographical excitement it generated stemmed from the large *rotunda type , whose *sorts have been filed to...

Hamlet, Prince of Denmark

Hamlet, Prince of Denmark   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
4,261 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...the Ghost, unseen by Gertrude, reappears and urges him not to be distracted from his revenge. Hamlet assures Gertrude he is not insane and makes her promise secrecy before dragging off Polonius’ body. 4.1–3 Claudius, learning of Polonius’ death from Gertrude, sends Rosencrantz and Guildenstern to seek Hamlet: with great difficulty they bring the morbidly joking prince before Claudius, who tells Hamlet he is to be sent at once to England for his own protection but who discloses in soliloquy that he is sending letters along with the Prince instructing the...

Alexander legend

Alexander legend   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
286 words
Illustration(s):
1

...and Islamic literatures. Alexander Romances: a hare with a crossbow hunts a man. A monde renverse scene from a lower margin in The Romance of Alexander . The Bodleian Library, University of Oxford, MS Bodley 264 fol. 81v Francis G. Gentry W. J. Aerts et al ., Alexander the Great in the Middle Ages: Ten Studies on the Last Days of Alexander in Literary and Historical Writing (1978). J. Brummack , Die Darstellung des Orients in den deutschen Alexandergeschichten des Mittelalters (1966). G. Cary , The Medieval Alexander (1956). J. Cölln et al .,...

Alexander III

Alexander III (356–323 bc)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History
Length:
308 words
Illustration(s):
1

...resistance and he advanced through Batria to the Jaxartes, founding Alexandria-the-Furthest as a defence against nomadic Scythians. His defeat of the Indian ruler Porus on the Hydaspes (326) took him into new territory, but his weary soldiers persuaded him to turn back. On the return journey he sailed down the Hydaspes to the Indus delta, as he was anxious both to conquer Sind and to see ‘Ocean’, the great river that was believed to encircle the world. After a gruelling desert march he reached Susa in 324. Alexander died at Babylon in 323, in his 33rd year....

Argeads

Argeads   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
974 words
Illustration(s):
1

...of the Peloponnesus became ruler of Argos. According to tradition the Argeads ruled the kingdom of Macedonia from the middle of the seventh century bce until 310 bce when Alexander IV , the son of Alexander the Great and his Sogdian bride Roxane, was put to death along with his mother by Cassander (Diodorus Siculus 19.105.2; cf. Justin 15.2.5). In the following year Polyperchon eliminated the last of Alexander the Great's bloodline by killing Heracles, the illegitimate son of the king's mistress Barsine. Herodotus (5.20.4) speaks of Alexander I (r....

Icaros

Icaros   Reference library

Jean-François Salles

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
216 words
Illustration(s):
1

...on the maritime route to India . After the fall of the Seleucid empire, the island temporarily came under Characenian domination in the 1st cent. ad . A Christian church of the 6th cent. has recently been excavated. Jean-François Salles Icaros View of the 3rd–2nd-cent. bc Greek temple inside the Seleucid fortress on Icaros (mod. Failaka), an island off Kuwait. Seleucid interest in the Persian gulf was a legacy from Alexander the Great , whose unrealized plans to conquer and colonize eastern Arabia reflect the region’s importance in the...

Alexandrian Empire

Alexandrian Empire   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
3,763 words
Illustration(s):
2

...exhausted the bloodline of Alexander the Great and opened the way for the formation of new royal dynasties in the Near East headed by Ptolemy (Egypt), and Seleucus (Syria). Alexandrian Empire The political unity of the Alexandrian Empire had not long survived the fall of the Achaemenids, as the competition for greatness inspired by Alexander led to an unprecedented period of kingmaking among the Macedonians and, later, the local nobility of the Near East as well. Generally known as the Hellenistic Age, the three centuries following Alexander's death...

Alexander, Lloyd

Alexander, Lloyd   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
1,137 words
Illustration(s):
1

...young women, developing the fairy-tale tradition of the active heroine. The Gawgon and the Boy ( 2001 ) takes an unusual turn in Alexander's authorship; it is a warm and self-ironic childhood memoir just on the edge of the supernatural. The most essential characteristic of his works is the psychological and philosophical depth hidden behind the surface, as well as the brilliance of language and the richness of intertextual associations. Disguised as fantasy or adventure, his books are unquestionably about the here and now. The recurrent images of war and...

Sidon

Sidon   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Classical Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Classical studies
Length:
1,014 words
Illustration(s):
2

...in the Fifth Persian satrapy between c. 550 bc and 330 bc . Sidon welcomed Alexander the Great and was rapidly Hellenized. At his death the city became a possession of the Ptolemies and the Seleucid kings; it came under Roman rule in 64 bc . Four sculpted marble sarcophagi from the royal necropolis at Ayaa are outstanding. These are probably the work of Greek artists and show the adaptation of Greek architectural and sculptural motifs to an Oriental ideal. The sculpted reliefs on the sides of the ‘Satrap Sarcophagus’ (last quarter of the 5th...

View: