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Subject: Music

This US group was formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1978 by Steve Allen (guitar, vocals) and Ron Flynt (bass, vocals), two expatriate musicians from Tulsa, Oklahoma. Drummer Mike Gallo ...

Jesus

Jesus   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

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...committed to me. Go therefore to all nations and make them my disciples. … I will be with you always, to the end of time.” (28:1–7, 28:16–20) And forty days later he “ascended” into Heaven, accomplishing the return from the land of the dead and the apotheosis that mark hero myths as various as those of Herakles and Quetzalcoatl (Matthew 22:23–33; Mark 12:18–27, 16:6; Luke 20:27–40, 24:7, 24:15–49; John 11:1–44, 20:9). The development of the Christ hero was a natural outgrowth of the Christian hegemony achieved in Europe during the first millennium ...

Adam and Eve

Adam and Eve   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

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...After the man had named the creatures of God's creation, God decided to make a suitable partner for him. He put the man to sleep and removed one of his ribs, out of which he made the first woman , that name having been given to her by the man because “from man she was taken” (2:20–23). Adam's name comes from the Hebrew meaning “man” and perhaps from the Hebrew adamah , meaning “earth.” Adam named his partner Eve (Havvah), the “Mother of All Living Beings.” The name suggests a connection to the old Middle Eastern mother goddesses, who, like mother...

Islamic mythology

Islamic mythology   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

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...convinced them that the fruit of the tree contained the power that made angels and gods (7:19–22, 20:120), and the couple ate the fruit. It is noteworthy that it was the couple, not the woman first and the then the man, who committed this sin. After eating the fruit, the man and the woman became conscious of their nakedness and sexual feelings and covered their Genitals (7:27). Allah scolded them for listening to his enemy, and their life became hard (20:115– 121). Later, as in Genesis, God sent a great flood , during which the prophet Nuh ( Noah ) and...

Canaanite mythology

Canaanite mythology   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

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...active trade with Egyptians and Mesopotamians . “Canaanite” is a somewhat vague term that has referred to the indigenous Semitic peoples of the “Land of Canaan,” into which Hebrews migrated late in the second millennium. Numerous Canaanite tribes are listed in Genesis (10:15–20) among the Israelite conquests in the Land of Canaan. According to the Genesis (9:18–22) myth, Kan'an was the son of Noah 's son Ham , who was cursed for having seen his father's genitals. It was the descendants of Kan'an who were said to have originally settled in Canaan. We...

Prehistoric mythology of the Paleolithic

Prehistoric mythology of the Paleolithic   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

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...“mysteries”—her cycles, apparently associated with those of the moon, her birth-giving powers—are an important source of mythology. The best known of the European rock carvings of a female figure is the so-called Venus of Laussel, a tiny (17 cm or 7 inch) image dating from about 20,000 b.c.e. and discovered in 1911 on a ledge wall under a limestone overhang sheltering the ruins of a Paleolithic dwelling site near Lascaux. The “Venus” is one of many images found under the Laussel overhang, all of which point to a mythology of female mysteries and, perhaps,...

Heroic monomyth

Heroic monomyth   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

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...to us all and addresses our common need to move forward as individuals and as a species. “The Hero,” writes Campbell, “is the man or woman who has been able to battle past his personal and local historical limitations to the generally valid, normally human forms” ( 1949 , pp. 19–20). The essential characteristic of the universal hero myth is the giving of life to something bigger than itself. By definition, the true hero does not merely stand for the status quo; he or she breaks new ground. The questing hero is our cultural and collective psyche out on the...

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