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agōnĕs

agōnĕs  

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1 The term agōn and its derivatives can denote the informal and extempore rivalries that permeated Greek life in the general fight for survival and, success esp. philosophical, legal, and public ...
athletics

athletics  

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GreekAt the core of Greek athletics was an individual's struggle to gain victory over an opponent; hence it included not only (as ‘athletics’ implies nowadays) track and field events but also boxing, ...
Baron Pierre de Coubertin

Baron Pierre de Coubertin  

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(1863–1937)A French aristocrat whose passion for the educational and diplomatic potential of physical education and sport stimulated him to inspire a revival of the ancient Olympic Games. A congress ...
crown

crown  

A crown is the emblem of St Louis, St Olaf, St Wenceslas, and other royal saints.The expression the Crown is used for the reigning monarch representing a country's government, or the power or ...
culture-bringers

culture-bringers  

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Mythical figures who are credited with the invention of important cultural achievements. Around the 6th cent. bc the Greeks started to ascribe a number of inventions to gods and heroes. So Athena ...
Cylon

Cylon  

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An Athenian nobleman; winner at Olympia, perhaps in 640 bc. He married the daughter of Theagenēs, tyrant of Megara, and with his help and a few friends seized the Acropolis at Athens, with a view to ...
diaulos

diaulos  

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The race at the ancient Greek Olympic Games of a duration of two lengths of the stadium, seen as roughly similar to the modern 400-metre race. See also Olympic Games, ancient.
discus

discus  

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A throwing event that was included in the early ancient Olympic Games, and has been long established as a core field event in athletic competitions and meets worldwide. The discus is a circular ...
dolichos

dolichos  

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The ‘long race’ run at the ancient Olympics in Greece, introduced in 720 bc, and comparable to the modern 1,500- or 5,000-metre events. See also Olympic Games, ancient.
Elis

Elis  

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City of the Peloponnese of Greece, deserving immortal fame because, in honour of its native son Pyrrho, it passed a law exempting all philosophers from taxation.
Empedocles

Empedocles  

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(c. 493–c. 433 bc),Greek philosopher, born in Sicily. He taught that the universe is composed of fire, air, water, and earth, which mingle and separate under the influence of the opposing principles ...
Endymion

Endymion  

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A remarkably beautiful young man, loved by the Moon (Selene); well-known tradition claims that he had fifty daughters by Selene. According to one story, he was put in an eternal sleep by Zeus for ...
Eratosthenes

Eratosthenes  

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(c.276–c.194 bc)Greekwriter on many subjects, born in modern Libya. He made the first known calculation of the Earth's circumference that was based on a scientifically sound method. According to ...
Eustathius

Eustathius  

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(12th cent. ad), born and educated in Constantinople, was deacon at St Sophia and taught rhetoric (and probably grammar) in the patriarchal school until 1178, when he became metropolitan of ...
Greece

Greece  

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Archaic, Classical, HellenisticArchaic period(776–479). The conventional date for the beginning of the historical period of Greece is 776, the date of the first Olympic Games on the reckoning of ...
Greece, ancient, sport in

Greece, ancient, sport in  

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Donald G. Kyle (Sport and Spectacle in the Ancient World, 2007) writes that sport was an essential custom for the ancient Greeks, contributing to Greek identity and cultural distinctiveness, and the ...
Greek religion

Greek religion  

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The religion of the ancient Greek world. It was polytheistic, involving the worship of several gods and goddesses. The most important deities were the sky-god Zeus (ruler of Olympus), his wife Hera ...
hellanodikai

hellanodikai  

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(‘Greek judges’), the title of the chief judges at the Olympian Games, the Nemean Games, and the Asclepian Games (see Asclepius) at Epidaurus. The Olympic hellanodikai were appointed for a ...
Hercules

Hercules  

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From Hercles, Italic pronunciation of the name Heracles. His was perhaps the earliest foreign cult to be received in Rome, the Ara Maxima, which was his most ancient place of worship, being within ...
Herod the Great

Herod the Great  

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(c.73–4bc), son of the Idumaean Antipater, was through him made governor of Galilee in 47 bc and then, with his brother, designated tetrarch by Mark Antony. Herod escaped the Parthian invasion of 40, ...

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