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agar

agar  

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n. an extract of certain seaweeds that forms a gel suitable for the solidification of liquid bacteriological culture media. Blood agar is nutrient agar containing 5–10% horse blood, used for the ...
algae

algae  

Single or multicellular predominantly aquatic plant organisms. In sewage treatment, algae are used for biological filtration. Under some circumstances they form a symbiotic relationship with ...
badderlocks

badderlocks  

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Edible seaweed (Alaria esculenta) found on northern British coasts and around the Faroe Islands. Known in Scotland as honeyware.
breaming

breaming  

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In the early days of sail, the method of cleaning the fouling off a ship's bottom by careening, and then burning off the seaweed, barnacles, etc., which had grown there through long immersion. The ...
carpogonium

carpogonium  

A female sex organ (gametangium) in seaweeds belonging to the class Rhodophyceae. Usually it consists of a swollen basal region, and a narrow, elongated, gelatinous tip which receives the male gamete.
carrageen

carrageen  

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Edible seaweed, Chondrus crispus, also known as Iberian moss or Irish sea moss, and Gigartina stellata; stewed in milk to make a jelly or blancmange. A source of carrageenan.
Chondrus crispus

Chondrus crispus  

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A seaweed, the source of carrageenan.
copper sheathing

copper sheathing  

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The process of protecting the hull of a wooden ship with thin sheets of copper. It prevents the teredo worm eating into the planks, and inhibits seaweed and barnacles from building up on the ship's ...
dabberlocks

dabberlocks  

Common name for the seaweed Alaria esculenta. The midribs of young plants are said to be edible.
diving

diving  

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A method of marine fishing in which some species (such as octopus, sea urchins, and sea cucumbers) are handpicked by divers, brought to the surface, placed in boats, and taken ashore for processing.
dulse

dulse  

The common name for the red seaweed Palmaria palmata (formerly Rhodymenia palmata). The thallus is flattened and usually dichotomously branched. It grows in the intertidal zone and at low-water mark, ...
echinoderm

echinoderm  

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A group of invertebrate animals including starfish (asteroids), sea urchins (echinoids), sea cucumbers (holothurians), brittle stars (ophuiroids), and sea lilies (crinoids). The basic design of the ...
environmental issues

environmental issues  

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Mankind has continually abused the sea, regarding it as an inexhaustible source of food and minerals, and a dumping ground for rubbish. Now it is more widely accepted that the oceans are finite, and ...
fingerware

fingerware  

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Edible seaweed, Laminaria digitata.
fouling

fouling  

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History
Any surface placed in the ocean soon gains a cover of bacteria, algae and seaweeds, and animals such as barnacles, and this is known as fouling. Fouling is a serious problem for vessels large and ...
green algae

green algae  

The common name for algae of the division Chlorophyta. Not all members are green; e.g., members of the genera Trentepohlia and Cephaleuros may be orange.
health foods

health foods  

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Foods and supplements promoted as being beneficial to health, although there is often little or no evidence to support the claims. They include vegetable foods and wholegrain cereals (for which there ...
holdfast

holdfast  

A differentiated structure in a seaweed or other alga, the function of which is to attach the thallus to a substrate (e.g. rocks, other plants, or shells). A holdfast may be superficially root-like ...
Irish moss

Irish moss  

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A red seaweed, Chondrus crispus; source of the polysaccharide carrageenan.
kelp

kelp  

The largest of the seaweeds. The giant kelps of the genus Macrocystis reach lengths of 100 meters and form great forests in shallow oceans. See agar, agarose, Phaeophyta.

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