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rex sacrōrum

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Agonium

Agonium  

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Name for 9 January, 17 March, 21 May, and 11 December in the Roman calendar; also Agonalia (Ovid Fasti 1. 324; possibly Agnalia at 1. 325), Agonia (Varro, De lingua ...
consul

consul  

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In ancient Rome, one of the two annually elected chief magistrates who jointly ruled the republic; any of the three chief magistrates of the first French republic (1799–1804). The word derives ...
patrician

patrician  

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Formed a privileged class of Roman citizens. The word is probably connected with patrēs (‘Fathers’), a formal collective term for patrician senators (see senate). In the republican period patrician ...
pontifex

pontifex  

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The Pope. The name comes (in the late 17th century) via French from Latin pontifex ‘high priest’.
rex

rex  

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The reigning king (used following a name or in the titles of lawsuits, e.g. Rex v. Jones: the Crown versus Jones).
strenae

strenae  

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Originally the luck-bringing (mostly laurel) twigs (from the grove of the goddess Strenia), also figs, honey-cakes, and dates, later any gifts, lamps, coins, and even gold, exchanged by the Romans ...
Tubilustrium

Tubilustrium  

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Roman festival on 23 March and 23 May, whose ‘trumpet purification’ readied the army for war (fasti Praenestini; Festus 480, 481 Lindsay). Calendars added Q(uando) R(ex) C(omitiavit) F(as): the rex ...

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