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Actor

Actor  

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The need to express emotion, whether in music, dancing, gesture, or speech, seems to be inherent in man, and to have developed originally in connection with religious observances. Nothing is ...
Ankara

Ankara  

[Gr. and Lat. Ancyra; Mod. Gr. Angora].Capital city of the Turkish Republic since 1923 and a center of trade and administration since antiquity. Ankara lies near the northern edge ...
Aphthonios

Aphthonios  

(᾽Αφθόνιος), rhetorician from Antioch and pupil of Libanios; fl. late 4th to beginning of 5th C.Of his abundant works only a textbook of exercises (progymnasmata) and 40 fables (mythoi) ...
Asterios of Amaseia

Asterios of Amaseia  

Cappadocian churchman and writer, overshadowed by his more famous contemporaries, the Cappadocian Fathers; born between 330 and 335, died between 420 and 425 (according to Datema, infra [1970] xxiv). ...
Basil of Caesarea

Basil of Caesarea  

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(in Cappadocia), c.ad 330–79 (the dates are debated but not disproved). He is honoured as the chief architect of monastic life in the Greek Church. His early education was completed at Athens, where ...
Chorikios of Gaza

Chorikios of Gaza  

6th-C. Christian rhetorician. Chorikios (Ξορίκιος) was pupil and eulogist of Prokopios of Gaza. Forty-six declamations of various types survive. Apart from the historical value of his panegyric on ...
Curia

Curia  

(βουλή), city council. In late antiquity curiae administered Cities and their territories, controlled local expenditure, sent embassies to the emperor, issued honorific decrees, and appointed urban ...
Daphne

Daphne  

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A park 9 km. (5 ½ mi.) south of Antioch (1), at natural springs supplying the city's water. Its inviolate temenos, with a temple of Apollo and Artemis, was dedicated ...
ekphrasis

ekphrasis  

An extended and detailed literary description of any object, real or imaginary. ‘There are ekphraseis of faces and objects and places and ages and many other things’ (Hermogenes).
Epistolography

Epistolography  

Or the art of writing letters, a genre of Byz. literature akin to rhetoric, popular with the intellectual elite. Copious examples survive from all periods, in more than 150 published ...
Eutropius

Eutropius  

The historian, probably from Gaul, who took part in Julian's Persian campaign (ad 363) and was magister memoriae of Valens, published a survey of Roman history (Breviarium ab urbe condita) ...
Festus

Festus  

(‘Rufus’ or ‘Ruffus’ Festus only in poor MSS), historian and senator from Tridentum, ‘of the lowest birth’ (Ammianus Marcellinus 29. 2. 22). He was magister memoriae under Valens (c.ad 369) ...
Greek letters

Greek letters  

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Letters in the Greek world could be written on metal, wax-coated wood, fragments of earthenware, animal skin, and (above all) papyrus (see books, Greek and Roman); a very early surviving ...
Hegesippus

Hegesippus  

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(c.390–c.325bc), Athenian statesman, contemporary with Demosthenes, nicknamed Krōbylos (‘Top-knot’) from his old-fashioned hairstyle, an obscure but not unimportant figure. He was already a man of ...
Himerius

Himerius  

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(c. ad 310–c. 390),Greek rhetorician. Born in Prusias in Bithynia, he studied in Athens, where he spent most of his life as a successful teacher of rhetoric. He was ...
hypothesis, literary

hypothesis, literary  

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(Greek). Prefixed to plays. Nearly all Athenian dramas have an introductory note giving an outline of the plot and often other information.
invective

invective  

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Is literature which, having regard to the customs and convictions of a given society, sets out to denigrate a named individual. Such denigration or abuse follows well‐articulated rhetorical ...
John Chrysostom

John Chrysostom  

(Ξρυσόστομος, “golden-mouth”), bishop of Constantinople (26 Feb. 398–20 June 404); saint; born Antioch between 340 and 350, died Komana 14 Sept. 407; feastday 13 Nov., translation of his relics 27 ...
Lakapenos, George

Lakapenos, George  

Writer and grammarian; fl. ca. 1297–1310/11, died before 1315.Lakapenos (Λακαπηνός) was probably a pupil of Maximos Planoudes and was active in literary circles in Constantinople under Andronikos II. ...
Nikomedeia

Nikomedeia  

(Νικομήδεια, now Izmit), city of Bithynia, the residence of Diocletian and his successors until 330. The foundation of Constantinople brought decline, but Nikomedeia remained a provincial capital and ...

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