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William George Hoskins

(1908—1992) historian of the English landscape

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deserted villages

deserted villages  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
A derelict village site. Most English deserted villages were abandoned in the late Middle Ages, and traces—building lines, lumps of masonry, clumps of nettles, and isolated churches—may still be seen ...
enclosure

enclosure  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
The process or policy of fencing in waste or common land so as to make it private property, as pursued in much of Britain in the 18th and early 19th centuries.
Great Rebuilding

Great Rebuilding  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
In a pioneering aricle, ‘The Rebuilding of Rural England, 1570–1640’, Past and Present, 4 (1953), W. G. Hoskins argued that agricultural prices increased so much during the Elizabethan and early ...
H. P. R. Finberg

H. P. R. Finberg  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
(1900–74)Herbert Finberg was Head of the Department of English Local History at the University of Leicester, first as Reader and then as Professor, from 1952 to his retirement in 1965. His first ...
Highland Zone

Highland Zone  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
[Ge]A term popularized in archaeological circles in Britain by Cyril Fox from the 1930s onwards to refer to the upland regions of the north and west of the British Isles that are characterized by ...
Hodder and Stoughton landscape histories

Hodder and Stoughton landscape histories  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
The publication of W. G. Hoskins, The Making of the English Landscape (1955), was intended as a general introduction to the subject, to be followed by a series of books on the counties of England, ...
Hoskins, W. G.

Hoskins, W. G. (1908–92)   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Family and Local History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
1,029 words

(1908–92)

William Hoskins was the great popularizer of local history and, at the same time, the leading academic

inventories, probate

inventories, probate  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
From the early 16th century to the mid-18th century (and in some districts until much later) it was the custom of the ecclesiastical courts that proved wills in England and ...
landscape

landscape  

Scenery, either natural (natural landscape) or modified by human activities (cultural landscape); often used to refer to the expanse of scenery that can be seen from a single viewpoint. See also ...
Leicester University Centre for English Local History

Leicester University Centre for English Local History  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
Founded in 1948 as the Department of English Local History with W. G. Hoskins as reader and sole member, it quickly became a unique postgraduate department concerned with the comparative study of ...
Maurice Warwick Beresford

Maurice Warwick Beresford  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
(1920–2005) [Bi]Landscape historian who discovered the lost villages of England. Born on the northern fringes of Birmingham, he attended Bishop Vesey's Grammar School in Sutton Coldfield and Jesus ...
palimpsest

palimpsest  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(from πάλν ‘again’, and ψηστός ‘rubbed smooth’), a manuscript in which a later writing is superimposed on an effaced earlier writing. Of frequent occurrence in the early Middle Ages because of the ...
prehistory

prehistory  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The history of the time before written records were kept. The only source of evidence concerning early societies is archaeological. It thus covers an immense period that begins with the study of ...
urban topography

urban topography  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
British local history has its roots in the countryside, and it is significant that the historical study of †towns as physical places has often used rural metaphors without any sense of incongruity. ...
vernacular architecture

vernacular architecture  

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Overview Page
Unpretentious, simple, indigenous, traditional structures made of local materials and following well-tried forms and types, normally considered in three categories: agricultural (barns, farms, etc.), ...

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