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Guido Delle Colonne

(c. 1210—1287)

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Benoît de Sainte-Maure

Benoît de Sainte-Maure  

A 12th‐cent. trouvère patronized by Henry II of England, for whom he composed a verse history of the dukes of Normandy. His best‐known work is the Roman de Troie, based on the writings of Dares ...
Cassandra

Cassandra  

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In myth, daughter of Priam and Hecuba. In Homer she is mentioned as being the most beautiful of Priam's daughters, and she is the first to see her father bringing home the body of Hector. The Sack of ...
classical literature

classical literature  

(see also classical antiquity; Latin; Geoffrey Chaucer: reading). Medieval writers did not make as strict a distinction between classical and later Latin literature as did the humanists of the ...
Filostrato

Filostrato  

A poem in ottava rima on the story of Troilus and Cressida, by Boccaccio (1335), of special interest as the source of Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde.
Isiphile

Isiphile  

The daughter of Thoas, the legendary king of Lemnos (Lemnon). She rescued her father when the women of the island decided to kill all the men. When the Argonauts came ...
John Lydgate

John Lydgate  

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Literature
(?1370–1449),spent nearly all his life in the monastery at Bury. He is one of the most voluminous of all English poets. Of his more readable poems, most were written in the first decade of the 15th ...
Sicilian School

Sicilian School  

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Literature
Group of poets associated with the court of Frederick II in Sicily and southern Italy, active c.1230–50. Of 20 to 30 poets associated with the ‘school’, the most important are ...
translation

translation  

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Literature
The provision of an expression in one language meaning the same as that of another. In so far as different languages reflect different cultural and social histories, because of the holism of meaning, ...
Troilus and Criseyde

Troilus and Criseyde  

Chaucer's longest complete poem, in 8,239 lines of rhyme‐royal probably written in the second half of the 1380s. Chaucer takes his story from Boccaccio's Il Filostrato, adapting its eight books to ...

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