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vaccine

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Albert Bruce Sabin

Albert Bruce Sabin  

(1906–1994)US microbiologist, born in Poland, who developed the oral vaccine against poliomyelitis that is still widely used and is named after him.Born in Bialystok (now in Poland), Sabin emigrated ...
attenuation

attenuation  

The reduction in the intensity of solar radiation (or other electromagnetic radiation) through absorption and scattering in the Earth's atmosphere. See also turbidity.
DPT, DPTP

DPT, DPTP  

Initial letters of the combined vaccines for diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus and diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus-poliomyelitis, recommended for immunizing infants against these diseases. See ...
immunization

immunization  

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Overview Page
(im-yoo-ny-zay-shŏn)the production of immunity by artificial means. Passive immunity may be conferred by the injection of an antiserum, but the production of active immunity calls for the use of a ...
inoculation

inoculation  

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Overview Page
n. the introduction of a small quantity of material, such as a vaccine, in the process of immunization: a more general name for vaccination.
Louis Pasteur

Louis Pasteur  

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(1822–95)French chemist and microbiologist, who held appointments in Strasbourg (1849–54) and Lille (1854–57), before returning to Paris to the Ecole Normale and the Sorbonne. From 1888 to his death ...
monoclonal antibody

monoclonal antibody  

Antibody made from cloned organisms, i.e., all with identical DNA. The main uses of monoclonal antibodies are in specific anticancer therapy and immunosuppression.
poxvirus

poxvirus  

One of a group of DNA-containing viruses, often enclosed in an outer membrane, that typically produce skin lesions in vertebrates. They include the viruses causing smallpox (variola) and cowpox ...
smallpox vaccine

smallpox vaccine  

The antigenic preparation used to elicit an active immunity to smallpox. Commercial vaccines contain freeze-dried Vaccinia virus. See immunity, pox viruses, vaccine, Variola virus.
toxoid

toxoid  

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Overview Page
n. a poisonous material (toxin), such as that produced by tetanus and diphtheria agents, that has been rendered harmless by chemical treatment while retaining its antigenic activity. Toxoids are used ...
vaccination

vaccination  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A means of producing immunity (immunization) to a disease by the administration of a preparation of antigenic material (vaccine) to stimulate the formation of appropriate antibodies. Vaccination is ...
vaccine

vaccine   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
32 words

any preparation of immunogenic material suitable for the stimulation of active immunity in animals without inducing disease. Vaccines may be

vaccine

vaccine   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
45 words

Agent used to give immunity against various diseases without producing symptoms. A vaccine consists of modified disease organisms, such as

vaccine

vaccine   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
A preparation containing killed or attenuated micro-organisms (i.e. micro-organisms that have lost their virulence), such as viruses, that is introduced into the human body to stimulate ... More
virus

virus  

A submicroscopic particle of RNA or DNA, coated with protein and capable of self-replication within the cells of an organism, where its effects are often pathogenic. [From Latin virus venom]

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