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1968

1968  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Was the year of protest par excellence. As in 1848, social revolt spread through the peninsula while also taking place in other countries, as movements from below challenged centres of ...
Aberdeen

Aberdeen  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A royal burgh (1178) with two universities by 1600, became a significant port and developed a range of industries after 1750, including linen, cotton and woollens, shipbuilding and engineering, ...
academic board

academic board  

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Overview Page
A committee of staff and managers in a university or college which meets regularly for the purpose of regulating and monitoring the academic affairs of the institution. Staff members are usually ...
academic freedom

academic freedom  

The right of scholars to study and report on any problem that their curiosity and conscience dictate, without fear of retribution. This right may be infringed when studies are paid for by ...
administration, royal

administration, royal  

A neutral notion of ‘state’, independent from the person of the ruler, is unknown in the MA. Administrative as well as legislative and judicial power emanated from the right of ...
administration, urban

administration, urban  

The organization of an urban settlement with its complex social relations and its orientation towards secondary and tertiary economic activities necessitated an early administrative development ...
Aix-en-Provence

Aix-en-Provence  

This Roman resort town became a regional capital of Gaul in the late empire. Originally under the ecclesiastical control of Arles, it became an archbishopric in the 8th century, and ...
al- Azhar

al- Azhar  

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Overview Page
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Religion
Founded in 969/970, this Cairene university may have been named for the prophet Muhammad's daughter Fatimah “al-Zahra” (the brilliant), the eponymous ancestor of the Fatimids, founder of Cairo. ...
Albertists

Albertists  

Followers of Albertus Magnus, mentor of Thomas Aquinas. Albert had been particularly receptive to Aristotelianism, though he was also influenced by Neoplatonism. He insisted on the importance of ...
Alexander IV, Pope

Alexander IV, Pope  

(c.1185–1261)Reginald was a son of Philip, lord of Jenne, with possessions at Subiaco and in the diocese of Anagni. According to Matthew Paris, he was the nephew of Pope ...
Alexander McAllister

Alexander McAllister  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1877–1944),playwright and novelist. Born in Dublin, and educated at the Royal University [see universities], he became chief secretary at NUI, and wrote the plays Irene Wycherly (1906) and At ...
American Popular Revolutionary Alliance

American Popular Revolutionary Alliance  

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The Alianza Popular Revolucionaria Americana (APRA) was the brainchild and political vehicle of the Peruvian leader Víctor Raúl Haya de la Torre (1895–1979). Created both as a national political ...
Ancient Rome

Ancient Rome  

Ancient Rome continued to be a major reference point for the culture of the Enlightenment, due notably to the central role played by Latin. There was a gradual decline in ...
Andrew Melville

Andrew Melville  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
(1545–1622).Scottish Reformer and theologian, concerned especially with educational reform. Entrusted in 1575 with the responsibility of compiling the Second Book of Discipline, he vigorously opposed ...
Angelo Mazza

Angelo Mazza  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1741–1817).Poet, who became Professor of Greek at the university of his native Parma. His verse tends towards lofty and sonorous abstraction, and poems such as ‘L'aura armonica’ of 1772 ...
Angelo Poliziano

Angelo Poliziano  

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Overview Page
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Literature
 (1454–94) Florentine humanist, the foremost vernacular poet and classical scholar of his day.A Medici protégé, he had easy access to ancient literature; through intense study of it he made ...
Angers

Angers  

City on the Maine river, 310 km southwest of Paris. By the mid 4th century it was a Christian bishopric. From the late 10th century it was the seat of ...
Antidotarium Nicolai

Antidotarium Nicolai  

(12th century?) A collection of recipes for compound medicines based on plants and minerals, originally in Latin, and arranged in alphabetical order starting with Aurea Alexandrina. It was a ...
Antonio da Butrio

Antonio da Butrio  

(1338–1408)This celebrated Decretalist was venerated in his lifetime both for his qualities as a professor and for the example of his religious and moral virtues. His university career was ...
architectural styles and features

architectural styles and features  

With the reign of King David I (1124–53), Scotland became a part of the western European polity of feudalism. Its most visible symbol was the castle, which was introduced by ...

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