Overview

Acts of Uniformity

Return to overview »

You are looking at 1-20 of 46 entries

View:

Act of Supremacy

Act of Supremacy  

(1534 and 1559)Enactments of the English Parliament, confirming respectively the supremacy of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I over the Anglican Church. Henry was styled “Supreme Head” of the Church but ...
Acts of Uniformity

Acts of Uniformity   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Religion
Length:
668 words

These acts represent the successive efforts of Edward VI and Elizabeth I to impose a standardized form of Protestant worship

Alternative Services

Alternative Services  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The Prayer Book (Alternative and Other) Services Measure 1965 provided that for a limited period the services of the C of E might follow forms sanctioned by the Church Assembly (later by the General ...
Annexed Book

Annexed Book  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The actual BCP annexed to the Act of Uniformity of 1662, which prescribed the use of ‘true and perfect copies’ of it.
anniversaries

anniversaries  

It was early in the 3rd c. that the Christians seem to have got into the habit of commemorating the dead on the anniversary of their decease, at first designated ...
Benjamin Whichcote

Benjamin Whichcote  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(1609–83)English liberal theologian. Whichcote was the senior of the Cambridge Platonists, and through his position as Provost of King's was an influential opponent of the Calvinism of his time. He ...
book of Advertisements

book of Advertisements  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The abbreviated title of a book issued by Abp. M. Parker in 1556. Among other things it ordered the use of the surplice at the Eucharist and kneeling at the reception of Communion. It is disputed ...
Book of Common Prayer

Book of Common Prayer  

(often BCP).The major prayer book of the Anglican Church, and official service book of the Church of England. Its centrality and continuing use is advocated by the Prayer Book Society.[...]
Charles II

Charles II  

(1630–85),king of England, Ireland, and Scotland (acceded 1649, restored 1660–85). Charles received his practical education in 1648–51 when he learnt how to adapt to rapidly changing circumstances, ...
Church of England

Church of England  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The Christian Church which is ‘by law established’ in England. The Church of England is a consequence of the Reformation, as this was mediated under the 16th-cent. Tudor sovereigns. As ...
Church of Ireland

Church of Ireland  

Building on 4th‐cent. traces, Patrick evangelized Ireland (c.432) and developed a distinctively Celtic Christianity, but with the partial Anglo‐Norman conquest of Ireland the church again joined ...
Clarendon code

Clarendon code  

The title given, inaccurately, to the statutes passed after the Restoration re‐establishing the Church of England. They embodied the vindictiveness of the cavalier majority in Parliament rather than ...
Cuthbert Tunstall

Cuthbert Tunstall  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(1474–1559), Bp. of London (1522–30) and then of Durham. In the divorce of Henry VIII he was one of the counsel of the Queen. Subsequently he was sympathetic to Catholic doctrine, but lacked strength ...
Declarations of Indulgence

Declarations of Indulgence  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Four proclamations issued by Charles II and James II of England in an attempt to achieve religious toleration. Charles II issued Declarations in 1662 and 1672, stating that the penal laws against ...
dissent

dissent  

(nonconformity). Though dissenting sects could trace some of their doctrines to well before the Reformation, for example to the lollards, pre‐Reformation heterodoxy is usually termed schism or ...
dissenting academies

dissenting academies  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
The Act of Uniformity (1662) excluded dissenting ministers from their posts. Many, out of necessity, became teachers. Dissenting academies were particularly popular in Devon, Lancashire, London, and ...
Edmund Calamy

Edmund Calamy  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(1600–66), ‘the Elder’, English Presbyterian. He was one of the authors of the composite work Smectymnuus. In the Westminster Assembly of 1643 he tried to defend presbyterianism as a middle way ...
Edward VI

Edward VI  

(1537–53),king of England (1547–53). Since Edward was 9 years old when he succeeded Henry VIII in 1547, he was in tutelage for the greater part of his reign, with Somerset as his governor until 1549 ...
Elizabethan Settlement

Elizabethan Settlement  

Defining the official state religion that became known as Anglicanism, the Elizabethan Settlement of 1559 made England a permanently Protestant nation. It consists of a set of statutes passed in ...
Enabling Act

Enabling Act  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The commonly used name for the Church of England Assembly (Powers) Act 1919. It gave the Church Assembly power to prepare ecclesiastical measures and, after they were approved by an Ecclesiastical ...

View: