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Achaean Confederacy

Achaean Confederacy  

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Overview Page
Federal organization developed by the twelve Achaean cities united in cult of Zeus. First mentioned in 453 bc as Athenian allies, Achaea's independence was guaranteed in 446 (Thirty Years Peace). In ...
Achilles

Achilles  

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Overview Page
Son of Peleus and Thetis; greatest Greek hero in the Trojan War; central character of Homer's Iliad. He is king of Phthia, or ‘Hellas and Phthia’, in southern Thessaly, and his people are the ...
Aegean Cultures

Aegean Cultures  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Archaeology
OverviewCycladic CultureMinoan CultureHelladic (Mycenaean) CultureMycenaeOverviewCycladic CultureMinoan CultureHelladic (Mycenaean) CultureMycenaeThe Bronze Age civilizations of the Aegean basin, ...
Aeneas

Aeneas  

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Overview Page
In classical mythology, a Trojan leader, son of Anchises and Aphrodite, and legendary ancestor of the Romans. When Troy fell to the Greeks he escaped and after wandering for many years eventually ...
Aeneid

Aeneid  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
An epic poem in Latin hexameters by Virgil, recounting the adventures of Aeneas after the fall of Troy.
Agamemnon

Agamemnon  

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Overview Page
In Greek mythology, king of Mycenae and brother of Menelaus, commander-in-chief of the Greek forces in the Trojan War. On his return home from Troy he was murdered by his wife Clytemnestra and her ...
Agamenon

Agamenon  

Agamemnon, son of Atreus (hence called Attrides), the king of Mycenae and brother of Menelaus, the husband of Helen (Eleyne), led the Greek forces at the siege of Troy. Troilus ...
Aias

Aias  

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Son of Telamon, king of Salamis. He brought twelve ships from Salamis to Troy. In the Iliad he is enormous, head and shoulders above the rest, and the greatest Greek warrior after Achilles. His stock ...
Ajax

Ajax  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
In Greek mythology, a hero of the Trojan war, the son of Telamon, king of Salamis; he was proverbial for his size and strength. After the death of Achilles, he quarrelled with Odysseus as to which of ...
allusion

allusion  

An indirect or passing reference to some event, person, place, or artistic work, the nature and relevance of which is not explained by the writer but relies on the reader's familiarity with what is ...
Amazon

Amazon  

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Overview Page
Mythical race of female warriors. The name was popularly understood as ‘breastless’ (maza, ‘breast’) and the story told that they ‘pinched out’ or ‘cauterized’ the right breast so as not to impede ...
Anchises

Anchises  

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In Greek legend, the ruler of Dardanus and father of Aeneas; according to the Aeneid, when Troy fell he was carried out of the burning ruins on his son's shoulders.
Antenor

Antenor  

(Walton: Troilus and Cressida). Bar. Capt. of the Trojans, he is captured by the Greeks and returned in exchange for Cressida. Created (1954) by Geraint Evans.
archaeology

archaeology  

The study of past human cultures through the analysis of material remains (as fossil relics, artefacts, and monuments), which are usually recovered through excavation.
archaeology, classical

archaeology, classical  

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Overview Page
The study of the material culture of ancient Greece and Rome. Epigraphy, the study of inscriptions on permanent materials, is today seen as a branch of historical rather than of archaeological ...
Asia Minor

Asia Minor  

The term ‘Asia Minor’ denotes the westernmost part of the Asian continent, equivalent to modern Turkey between the Aegean and the Euphrates. The west and south coastal fringes were part of the ...
Askanius

Askanius  

Ascanius son of Aeneas, who led him from Troy ‘in his ryght hand’ (LGW 942); he is also mentioned in The House of Fame 178 and The Legend of Good Women 1138. (See Eneyde; Iulo.)[...]
Benoît de Sainte-Maure

Benoît de Sainte-Maure  

A 12th‐cent. trouvère patronized by Henry II of England, for whom he composed a verse history of the dukes of Normandy. His best‐known work is the Roman de Troie, based on the writings of Dares ...
Carl Blegen

Carl Blegen  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Archaeology
(1887–1971) [Bi]American archaeologist specializing in Greek prehistory. Born in Minneapolis, he was educated at Augsburg Seminary, the University of Minnesota, and Yale where he took his Ph.D. After ...
classical antiquity

classical antiquity  

(see also classical literature). Medieval illustrations of the siege of Troy show a walled town (sometimes with a drawbridge) and battles between knights in armour . Modern readers of Troilus ...

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